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Photomontage Cincinnati V01.jpg

Cincinnati (/ˌsɪnsɪˈnæti/ SIN-sih-NAT-ee) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and is the government seat of Hamilton County. Settled in 1788, the city is located at the northern side of the confluence of the Licking and Ohio rivers. The city drives the Cincinnati–Middletown–Wilmington combined statistical area, which had a population of 2,172,191 in the 2010 census. With a population of 301,301, Cincinnati is the third-largest city in Ohio and 65th in the United States. It is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwestern United States based on percentages and the 28th-biggest metropolitan statistical area in the U.S. Cincinnati is also within a single day's drive of two-thirds of the United States populace.

In the nineteenth century, Cincinnati was an American boomtown in the heart of the country. Throughout much of the 19th century, it was listed among the top 10 U.S. cities by population, surpassed only by New Orleans and the older, established settlements of the United States eastern seaboard, as well as being the sixth-biggest city for a period spanning 1840 until 1860. As Cincinnati was the first city founded after the American Revolution, as well as the first major inland city in the country, it is regarded as the first purely "American" city.

Cincinnati developed with fewer immigrants and less influence from Europe than east coast cities in the same period. However, it received a significant number of German immigrants, who founded many of the city's cultural institutions. By the end of the 19th century, with the shift from steamboats to railroads drawing off freight shipping, trade patterns had altered and Cincinnati's growth slowed considerably. The city was surpassed in population by other inland cities, particularly Chicago, which developed based on strong commodity exploitation, economics, and the railroads, and St. Louis, which for decades after the Civil War served as the gateway to westward migration.

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Norwood is the second most populous city in Hamilton County, Ohio, United States. The city is an enclave of the larger city of Cincinnati. The population was 21,675 at the 2000 census. Originally settled as an early suburb of Cincinnati in the wooded countryside north of the city, the area is characterized by stately older homes and tree lined streets. Norwood is currently undergoing an economic revitalization thanks to recent retail and business development.

The area now known as Norwood was settled in the early 1800s as a coach stop along the Montgomery Road turnpike near the present day intersection of Smith Road. The village was originally named Sharpsburg after an early settler named John Sharpe. It was informally referred to as "Northwood" due to its location north of Cincinnati and being heavily wooded countryside. Much of the area was horse farms or fruit and vegetable orchards. The Marietta & Cincinnati; Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern; and Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern railroads were built through the area, leading to increasing settlement in the countryside.

Norwood is known as the "Gem of the Highlands". Traditionally, the nickname "Gem of the Highlands" has been more of a public relations moniker for the city and is not commonly used by residents in casual conversation. Newer nicknames such as "The Wood" and "N-Wood" have emerged and are more commonly used by locals in day-to-day discourse.

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Paul Brown Stadium.JPG
Photo credit: Joe Steinsky
Paul Brown Stadium is the home of the Cincinnati Bengals.

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Sports

The Cincinnati Bengals are a professional American football team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. They are currently members of the North Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). Their first season, 1968, was as an American Football League franchise, but they joined the NFL as part of the 1970 AFL-NFL Merger, which had actually been agreed to in 1966.

In 1967 a Cincinnati-based ownership group led by Paul Brown was granted a franchise in the American Football League. As the founder and head coach of the Cleveland Browns from 1946 to 1962, Brown led his team to a .759 winning percentage and seven championships, which includes four championships earned while a member of the All-America Football Conference. Brown became a recognized innovator for his approach to training, game planning, and the passing game. However, Brown sold his minority interest in the team in 1961 to businessman Art Modell. On January 9, 1963, Modell fired Brown.

By 1966, Paul Brown wanted to become involved in professional football again. James A. Rhodes, then the governor of Ohio, convinced Brown that Ohio needed a second team. Cincinnati was deemed the logical choice, in essence, splitting the state.

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Jungle Jim's International Market, formerly Jungle Jim's Farmer's Market, is a large supermarket in Fairfield, Ohio that has been described as a theme park of food. Founded in 1971 by "Jungle" Jim Bonaminio, the store started as a small produce stand, and has grown to 48,000 items over 285,000 square feet (26,500 m2) of floorspace. Jungle Jim's is notable for one of the largest wine collections in the United States, live seafood tanks, and an in-store cooking school. Each week, the store is visited by approximately 50,000 shoppers, whom Bonaminio calls "foodies". Many of the specialty foods in the store's Asian and European departments are difficult to find elsewhere in the Greater Cincinnati area, and customers have been known to drive from other cities for the store's wide variety of food.

On the show Unwrapped, Marc Summers mentioned about Jim opening a whole food amusement park.

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Gerald Norman "Jerry" Springer (born February 13, 1944) is a British-born American celebrity; a former Democratic mayor of Cincinnati; musician; television personality; and host of the controversial television tabloid talk show bearing his name, The Jerry Springer Show, since its debut in 1991.

Springer became a political campaign aide to Robert F. Kennedy. After Kennedy's assassination, he joined the Cincinnati law firm of Frost & Jacobs, now Frost Brown Todd.

In 1970, Springer ran for Congress, but failed to unseat incumbent Republican Donald D. Clancy, garnering 45% of the vote. He had previously spearheaded the effort to lower the voting age, and had testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee in support of ratification of the 26th Amendment.

The Jerry Springer Show debuted on 20 September 1991. It was developed by WLWT-TV to replace its Phil Donahue Show. It started as a politically oriented talk show, a longer version of Springer's commentaries. Guests included Oliver North and Jesse Jackson, and topics included homelessness and gun politics.

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Cincinnati oh skyline.jpg You are invited to participate in WikiProject Cincinnati, a task force dedicated to developing and improving articles about the Greater Cincinnati area.

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