Pompano Beach, Florida

Pompano Beach (/ˈpɒmpən/ POMP-ə-noh) is a city in Broward County, Florida, United States, along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. The Hillsboro Inlet forms part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway.[10]

Pompano Beach, Florida
City
City of Pompano Beach
Pompano Beach Aerial (33138305683).jpg
Flag of Pompano Beach, Florida
Official seal of Pompano Beach, Florida
Motto(s): 
"Florida's Warmest Welcome"[1]
Location of Pompano Beach in Broward County, Florida
Location of Pompano Beach in Broward County, Florida
Coordinates: 26°14′5″N 80°7′32″W / 26.23472°N 80.12556°W / 26.23472; -80.12556Coordinates: 26°14′5″N 80°7′32″W / 26.23472°N 80.12556°W / 26.23472; -80.12556
CountryUnited States
State Florida
CountyLogo of Broward County, Florida.svg Broward
Settled (Pompano Settlement)Circa Mid-1880s–1896[2][3]
Incorporated (Town of Pompano)July 3, 1908[3][4]
Incorporated (City of Pompano Beach)June 6, 1947[3][4][5]
Government
 • TypeCommission-Manager
 • MayorRex Hardin
 • Vice MayorBeverly Perkins
 • CommissionersRhonda Eaton, Andrea McGee, Cyndy Floyd, and Tom McMahon
 • City ManagerGregory Harrison
 • City ClerkAsceleta Hammond
Area
 • City24.69 sq mi (63.95 km2)
 • Land24.02 sq mi (62.21 km2)
 • Water0.67 sq mi (1.74 km2)  5.54%
Elevation
13 ft (4 m)
Population
 • City112,118
 • Density4,541.03/sq mi (1,802.36/km2)
 • Metro
6,158,824
Time zoneUTC−5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
33060-33077, 33093, 33097
Area code(s)754, 954
FIPS code12-58050[7]
GNIS feature ID0289162[8]
Websitewww.pompanobeachfl.gov

HistoryEdit

Pompano Beach is named for the Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus), a fish found off the Atlantic coast.[11]

The first documented permanent residents of the Pompano area were railway employees who arrived in 1896.[3] The first train arrived Pompano Beach on February 22, 1896.[3] In 1906, Pompano became the southernmost settlement in Palm Beach County and the Hillsboro Lighthouse was completed on the beach.[3]

On July 3, 1908, Pompano was incorporated in Dade County.[2][3] John R. Mizell was the town's first mayor. In 1909, Palm Beach County was created, and Pompano was its southernmost city. In 1915, Broward County was established, with a northern boundary at the Hillsboro Canal.[2][3]

A murder in Pompano Beach prompted the 1940 U.S. Supreme Court to disallow forced confessions in Chambers v. Florida.[12]

In 1947, the City of Pompano merged with the beach's municipality and became the City of Pompano Beach.[2][5]

GeographyEdit

Pompano Beach has an area of 25.4 square miles (65.8 km2), of which 24.0 square miles (62.2 km2) is land and 1.4 square miles (3.6 km2), or 5.54 percent, is water.[10] It is in northeastern Broward County along the Atlantic Ocean. It includes about 3 miles (5 km) of beachfront extending from the intersection of State Road A1A and Terra Mar Drive to the Hillsboro Inlet.[citation needed]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910269
1920636136.4%
19302,614311.0%
19404,42769.4%
19505,68228.3%
196015,992181.5%
197038,587141.3%
198052,61836.4%
199072,41137.6%
200078,1918.0%
201099,84527.7%
2019 (est.)112,118[9]12.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]

In 2000, the median age of the Pompano Beach population was 42 years and the median income for a household in the city was $36,073 and for a family was $44,195. About 13.1% of families and 17.0% of the population lived below the poverty line. Italian-Americans made up 8.5% of the population, forming the second-largest ancestry group in the city.[14]

In 2010, Pompano Beach had the highest concentration of residents of Haitian ancestry in the country, with 9.3% of the population and the highest percentage of Brazilians in the U.S. with 2.67%.[15][16]

EducationEdit

Elementary schools in Pompano Beach include Pompano Beach Elementary School, C. Robert Markham Elementary, Cresthaven Elementary, Cypress Elementary, Drew Charles Elementary, McNab Elementary, Norcrest Elementary, Palmview Elementary and Sanders Park Elementary.

Middle schools are Pompano Beach Middle School and Crystal Lake Middle School, and the high schools are Blanche Ely High School and Pompano Beach High School.[17][18][19][20]

Schools outside of the Pompano Beach city limits include Coconut Creek HS (Coconut Creek) Deerfield Beach HS (Deerfield Beach) and Monarch HS (Coconut Creek).[21][22][23]

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Miami operates the Saint Coleman K-8 school in Pompano Beach.[24]

EconomyEdit

The largest employers in Pompano Beach are Pompano Park, the City of Pompano Beach, Broward County Correctional, Walmart and Publix.[25]

SportsEdit

The Pompano Beach Municipal Golf Course opened in 2013 with two 18-hole courses, the Palms, and the Pines.[26][27]

Parks and recreationEdit

Pompano Beach recreation includes the Fern Forest Nature Center, a community park and the Pompano Beach Airpark.

GovernmentEdit

The Pompano Beach City Commission comprises the mayor and five commissioners. The mayor is elected at-large for a four-year term and each commissioner is elected by district for a two-year term. Pompano Beach is located in Florida's 20th congressional district.[28][29]

MediaEdit

Pompano Beach is a part of the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood media market, which is the 16th-largest Designated Market Area (DMA) in the U.S. The DMA rank is a metric that is used to prioritize media markets by the size of their TV and radio audiences.[30] Daily newspapers are the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and The Miami Herald, and their Spanish-language counterparts El Sentinel and El Nuevo Herald.

InfrastructureEdit

TransportationEdit

The South Florida Regional Transportation Authority is headquartered in Pompano Beach.[31] Pompano Beach is served by bus routes operated by Broward County Transit.[32]

Notable peopleEdit

Sister citiesEdit

Pompano Beach's sister cities are:[52]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "City of Pompano Beach, Florida Website". City of Pompano Beach, Florida Website. Retrieved September 22, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d "Our History". Pompano Beach Historical Society. Retrieved July 4, 2010.[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "History of Pompano Beach, FL". City of Pompano Beach. Archived from the original on October 4, 2013. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  4. ^ a b "Broward-by-the-Numbers (pages 3–5)" (PDF). www.broward.org. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 10, 2015. Retrieved March 4, 2015.
  5. ^ a b William D. Halsey, ed. (1976). "Pompano Beach". Collier's Encyclopedia. 19. Macmillan Educational Corporation. p. 232.
  6. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  7. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  8. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  9. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  10. ^ a b "Census QuickFacts for Pompano Beach, Florida (2019)". Census.gov. U.S. Census Bureau, American Fact Finder. July 15, 2020.
  11. ^ "Profile for Pompano Beach, Florida, FL". ePodunk. Archived from the original on March 2, 2015. Retrieved September 22, 2012.
  12. ^ "Find Laws, Legal Information, and Attorneys – FindLaw". Retrieved July 1, 2016.
  13. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  14. ^ Data Access and Dissemination Systems (DADS). "American FactFinder – Results". census.gov. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020.
  15. ^ "Ancestry Map of Haitian Communities". Epodunk.com. Archived from the original on December 11, 2012. Retrieved October 28, 2007.
  16. ^ "Ancestry Map of Haitian Communities". Epodunk.com. Archived from the original on December 11, 2012. Retrieved December 5, 2007.
  17. ^ "Pompano Beach Middle School" (PDF). Broward County Public Schools. Retrieved May 9, 2020.
  18. ^ "Crystal Lake Middle School" (PDF). Broward County Public Schools. Retrieved May 9, 2020.
  19. ^ "Blanche Ely High School" (PDF). Broward County Public Schools. Retrieved May 9, 2020.
  20. ^ "Pompano Beach High School" (PDF). Broward County Public Schools. Retrieved May 9, 2020.
  21. ^ "Coconut Creek High School" (PDF). Broward County Public Schools. Retrieved May 9, 2020. – Compare to the zoning map.
  22. ^ "Deerfield Beach High." Broward County Public Schools. Retrieved on September 23, 2018.
  23. ^ "Monarch High School" (PDF). Broward County Public Schools. Retrieved May 9, 2020. – Compare to the zoning map.
  24. ^ "History". St. Coleman School. Retrieved May 10, 2020. 2250 SE 12th Street, Pompano Beach, FL 33062
  25. ^ "City of Pompano Beach 2012 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report" (PDF). p. 146. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 1, 2014.
  26. ^ "Pompano Beach Municipal Golf Course".
  27. ^ "Golf Course - Pompano Beach Parks".
  28. ^ "Florida's 22nd Congressional District - FL-22 Representatives & District Map". GovTrack.us. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  29. ^ "Election". pompanobeachfl.gov. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  30. ^ AdeptPlus. "Nielsen DMA 2021 Rankings". MediaTracks Communications. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  31. ^ "StackPath". www.masstransitmag.com. Retrieved September 8, 2021.
  32. ^ "Broward County Transit System Map" (PDF). July 1, 2019. Retrieved August 17, 2019.
  33. ^ "Dieuson Octave". Local 10.com. Archived from the original on March 9, 2017. Retrieved December 7, 2015.
  34. ^ "Tyrone Carter". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  35. ^ "Henri Crockett". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  36. ^ "Zack Crockett". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  37. ^ Whitby, Bob (February 22, 2001). "Screwed". Retrieved July 1, 2016.
  38. ^ "Cheers and Tears : People.com". Retrieved July 1, 2016.
  39. ^ Childers, Chad. "Paolo Gregoletto + Phil Labonte Engage in Online Beef". Loudwire. Retrieved February 22, 2019.
  40. ^ football-reference.com/players/H/HarrAl21.htm "Al Harris" Check |url= value (help). Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  41. ^ "Eddie Jones". Pro-Basketball Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  42. ^ "Barry Krauss". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  43. ^ "Jerome McDougle". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  44. ^ "Dan Nugent". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  45. ^ "Patrick Peterson". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  46. ^ "Jason Pierre-Paul". v. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  47. ^ "Jabari Price". v. Retrieved December 17, 2015.
  48. ^ "Rashard Robinson Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  49. ^ "Clint Session". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  50. ^ "Corey Simon". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  51. ^ "Brett Swenson". msuspartans.com. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  52. ^ "Sister Cities". pompanobeachfl.gov. City of Pompano Beach. Retrieved November 18, 2020.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit