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Poe v. Lynchburg Training School & Hospital

Poe v. Lynchburg Training School & Hospital, 518 F. Supp. 789 (W.D. Va. 1981), concerned whether or not patients who had been involuntarily sterilized in Lynchburg Training School and Hospital, a state mental institution in Virginia, as part of a program of eugenics in the early and mid-20th century had their constitutional rights violated.[1] The case had been filed in 1980 by the American Civil Liberties Union's Reproductive Freedom Project on behalf of 8,000 women who had been sterilized under the program.[2] The court ruled that the sterilization did not violate constitutional rights, and that though the statute on involuntary sterilization of "mental defectives" had since been repealed, it had previously been upheld as constitutional (in Buck v. Bell, 1927).

Poe v. Lynchburg Training School & Hospital
Virginia-western.gif
United States District Court for the Western District of Virginia
Full case nameJames Poe, et al. v. Lynchburg Training School & Hospital, et al.
Date decidedApril 13, 1981
Docket nos.Civ. A. No. 80-0172
Citations518 F. Supp. 789
Judge sittingJames Clinton Turk

However, the fact that state officials did not notify or provide subsequent medical services to the sterilized individuals was found to merit further consideration by the court. In a settlement reached in 1985, the state agreed to inform the women about what had been done to them and to help them get counseling and medical treatment.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Poe v. Lynchburg Training School & Hospital, 518 F. Supp. 789 (W.D. Va. 1981).
  2. ^ "About the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project". American Civil Liberties Union. Retrieved January 13, 2015. The Project filed Poe v. Lynchburg Training School on behalf of 8,000 women involuntarily sterilized by a state mental institution in Virginia. In a settlement reached in 1985, the state agreed to inform the women about what had been done to them and to help them get counseling and medical treatment.

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