Pinoy pop

P-pop (abbreviation: Philippine pop / Pinoy pop) or OPM pop / Filipino pop refers to popular contemporary music in the Philippines. With its beginnings in the 1970s, Filipino pop is a growing genre.[1] It stems from a broader genre, Original Pilipino Music (OPM).

HistoryEdit

Beginnings (1960s–1970s)Edit

Filipino pop songs mainly referred to songs popularized since the 1960s, especially those in the ballad form, by major commercial artists like Pilita Corrales and Nora Aunor, and in the 1970s by Basil Valdez, Freddie Aguilar and Rey Valera.

Singer-songwriters Ryan Cayabyab and José Mari Chan rose to fame in the 1970s by composing original English love songs alongside modern Tagalog songs. Pioneer pop groups in the same decade include Manila sound groups APO Hiking Society and Hotdog.

Golden age of Filipino musicEdit

In the 1980s, disco group VST & Co. and pop icon Gary V. gave rise to dance-pop in the mainstream.

Prominence of rock-acoustic bands, belters and balladeers. (mid-1990s to present)Edit

The early to mid-1990s saw the emergence of pop-rock group, Eraserheads, considered as a turning-point in the OPM music scene. In the wake of their success was the emergence of a string of influential bands such as Yano, Siakol, Parokya ni Edgar, Grin Department, Rivermaya, Moonstar 88 and Hungry Young Poets, each of which mixes the influence of a variety of pop and rock subgenres into their style.

Filipino rock continues to flourish at present with newer bands such as Hale, Cueshé, Sponge Cola, Chicosci, Kamikazee and Urbandub, and the emergence of the country's first virtual band, Mistula. Though only some of the spearheading bands are still fully intact, many old members have formed new bands such as Pupil, Sandwich and Bamboo. A few band members such as Kitchie Nadal, Barbie Almalbis and Rico Blanco have established steady solo careers.

Though rock bands have been dominating the mainstream since their commercialization in the '90s, acoustic groups were still regularly showcased in the live band scene such as Side A, True Faith, Neocolours, South Border and Freestyle popularized songs that clearly reflect the sentimental character of OPM pop. Popular acoustic acts like Nina, Juris (of MYMP) and Aiza Seguerra also prove the diversity of Filipino pop.

Solo belters and balladeers such as Regine Velasquez, Sharon Cuneta, Joey Albert, Donna Cruz, Zsa Zsa Padilla, Jaya, Jolina Magdangal and Martin Nievera had regular exposure on television and radio.

Re-emergence of R&B and novelty songs (2000s to present)Edit

From the early 2000s onwards, Kyla, Nina and Jay R began to be pioneers of the contemporary R&B music with Gloc-9 and Abra of hip-hop genre.

Local sing and dance groups SexBomb Girls and Viva Hot Babes began to popularize novelty songs among the masses.

Pinoy pop renaissance (2010s)Edit

Since 2010, the genre of Pinoy pop drastically changed as the usual rock bands and novelty songs from the 1990s and 2000s started to fade out of the mainstream, creating the new pop genre without any influence of rock and hip-hop.

Notable pop artists of the 2010s include Toni Gonzaga, Moira Dela Torre,Yeng Constantino and Sarah Geronimo whose songs Tala and Kilometro were chosen by CNN Philippines as best songs of the decade.[2]

The rise of P-pop idol groups (2020s)Edit

From the influence of K-pop and J-pop, a new era of P-pop was born. The Philippines' first idol group MNL48, a sister group of the J-pop group AKB48, started a new era for P-pop when they debuted in 2018. Following them is the all-boy idol group SB19 who also debuted in 2018. They are the first Filipino act trained by a Korean entertainment company under the same system that catapulted K-pop artists into global stardom. SB19 is considered to be the first P-pop idol group to chart on the Billboard Next Big Sound and Billboard Social 50.[3] On November 20, 2019, SB19 made history by being the first Filipino artist to chart and debut on the Billboard Next Big Sound chart debuting and peaking at No. 6. The Next Big Sound chart tracks "the fastest accelerating artists during the past week, across all major social music sites, statistically predicted to achieve future success," according to the Billboard website.[4] On December 3, 2019, the group broke the all-time record of the longest stay at the No. 1 spot of Myx Daily Top Ten with "Go Up" staying at the top spot for 53 non-consecutive days.[5]

Notable artistsEdit

FemaleEdit

MaleEdit

Groups/bandsEdit

International recognitionEdit

In 2010, Little Big Star 2nd runner-up and YouTube star Charice became the first Asian to peak on the top 10 (at No. 8) of the Billboard 200 for her debut album.[6] She was also one of the first Asian artists to have a song peak at No. 1 for Billboard's Dance/Club Play Songs.[7]

In 2020, Sarah Geronimo single "Tala" entered on the 12th spot in US World Digital Song Sales (Billboard)[8]

In 2020, P-pop boy group SB19 became a Billboard Social 50 mainstay after their hit single "Alab" stayed in the chart for more than 6 weeks.[9]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "History of Philippine Pop Music". www.playlistresearch.com. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  2. ^ "The 10 best Filipino songs of the 2010s". cnn. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  3. ^ "SB19 charts on Billboard anew". entertainment.mb.com.ph. Retrieved March 5, 2020.
  4. ^ "Pinoy group SB19 enters Billboard's Next Big Sound chart". news.abs-cbn.com. Retrieved November 20, 2019.
  5. ^ Bergania, Twila. "Exclusive: SB19". Cosmo.ph. Retrieved December 28, 2019.
  6. ^ Philippine Daily Inquirer, 22 May 2010, "Charice debuts at No. 8 on Billboard Archived 2010-05-25 at the Wayback Machine"
  7. ^ Sanchez, R. J., Manila Bulletin, 24 May 2010, "Charice happy with chart performance of her album, song"
  8. ^ "Sarah Geronimo Chart History (World Digital Song Sales)". Billboard. Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  9. ^ https://www.billboard.com/articles/business/chart-beat/8550040/sb19-social-50-next-big-sound-chart-filipino-boy-band-profile