Pieter Muller

Pieter Gysbert Muller (born 5 May 1969) is a former international South Africa rugby union player.[1] A centre, he was known for his strength and direct running.

Pieter Muller
Birth namePieter Gysbert Muller
Date of birth (1969-05-05) 5 May 1969 (age 52)
Place of birthBloemfontein, Free State, South Africa
Height1.87 m (6 ft 2 in)
Weight100 kg (220 lb)
SchoolGrey College, Bloemfontein
Notable relative(s)Helgard Muller (brother)
Rugby union career
Position(s) Centre
Amateur team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
1992–1995 College Rovers ()
Senior career
Years Team Apps (Points)
→1996–1997
2000–2004
Toulouse, France
Cardiff Blues
?
80
()
Provincial / State sides
Years Team Apps (Points)
1990–1991
1992–1995
1997–1999
Free State
Natal
Natal/Sharks
27

64
()
National team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
1992–1999 South Africa 33 (15)

Rugby union careerEdit

As a schoolboy, Muller represented Free State at the Craven Week tournaments in 1987 and 1988 and on both occasions were selected for the SA Schools team. He made his provincial debut for Free State in 1990, after spending some time playing club rugby in Ireland for Greystones R.F.C. In 1992, Muller joined Natal and was a member of the Currie Cup winning team in 1992. He suffered a serious neck injury early in 1995 that required time away from rugby, after which he tried rugby league and spent time in France playing for Toulouse. In 1997, Muller returned to the Sharks and in 2000 he joined Cardiff Blues in Wales.[2][3]

His first test match for the Springboks was in 1992 against the All Blacks at Ellis Park in Johannesburg and he scored a try on debut.[4] Muller played 33 test matches for the Springboks and was a member of the 1999 World Cup squad. His last test match for South Africa was the third place playoff at the 1999 World Cup against New Zealand at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff. Muller also played in 19 tour matches for the Springboks and scored 7 tries.[5]

Test historyEdit

No. Opposition Result (SA 1st) Position Tries Date Venue
1.   New Zealand 24–27 Centre 1 15 August 1992 Ellis Park, Johannesburg
2.   Australia 3–26 Centre 22 August 1992 Newlands, Cape Town
3.   France 20–15 Centre 17 October 1992 Stade de Gerland, Lyon
4.   France 16–29 Centre 24 October 1992 Parc des Princes, Paris
5.   England 16–33 Centre 14 November 1992 Twickenham, London
6.   France 20–20 Centre 26 June 1993 Kings Park, Durban
7.   France 17–18 Centre 3 July 1993 Ellis Park, Johannesburg
8.   Australia 19–12 Centre 1 31 July 1993 Aussie Stadium (SFG), Sydney
9.   Australia 20–28 Centre 14 August 1993 Ballymore Stadium, Brisbane
10.   Australia 12–19 Centre 21 August 1993 Aussie Stadium (SFG), Sydney
11.   Argentina 29–26 Centre 6 November 1993 Ferrocarril Oeste Stadium, Buenos Aires
12.   Argentina 52–23 Centre 13 November 1993 Ferrocarril Oeste Stadium, Buenos Aires
13.   England 15–32 Centre 4 June 1994 Loftus Versfeld, Pretoria
14.   England 27–9 Centre 11 June 1994 Newlands, Cape Town
15.   New Zealand 14–22 Centre 9 July 1994 Carisbrook, Dunedin
16.   Scotland 34–10 Centre 19 November 1994 Murrayfield, Edinburgh
17.   Wales 20–12 Centre 26 November 1994 Cardiff Arms Park, Cardiff
18.   Ireland 37–13 Centre 13 June 1998 Free State Stadium, Bloemfontein
19.   Ireland 33–0 Centre 20 June 1998 Loftus Versfeld, Pretoria
20.   Wales 96–13 Centre 27 June 1998 Loftus Versfeld, Pretoria
21.   England 18–0 Centre 4 July 1998 Newlands, Cape Town
22.   Australia 14–13 Centre 18 July 1998 Subiaco Oval, Perth
23.   New Zealand 13–3 Centre 25 July 1998 Athletic Park, Wellington
24.   New Zealand 24–23 Centre 15 August 1998 Kings Park, Durban
25.   Australia 29–15 Centre 29 August 1998 Ellis Park, Johannesburg
26.   Italy 74–3 Centre 12 June 1999 Boet Erasmus, Port Elizabeth
27.   Wales 19–29 Centre 26 June 1998 Millennium Stadium, Cardiff
28.   New Zealand 0–28 Centre 10 July 1999 Carisbrook, Dunedin
29.   Australia 6–32 Centre 17 July 1999 Suncorp Stadium, Brisbane
30.   Spain 47–3 Centre 1 10 October 1999 Murrayfield, Edinburgh
31.   England 44–21 Centre 24 October 1999 Stade De France, Paris
32.   Australia 21–27 Centre 30 October 1999 Twickenham, London
33.   New Zealand 22–18 Centre 4 November 1999 Millennium Stadium, Cardiff

Rugby leagueEdit

In 1996, Muller also had an unsuccessful stint playing for Australian rugby league side Penrith Panthers, in the Winfield Cup, making only a handful of appearances in the two years of his contract. Muller then returned to South Africa and club rugby before once again representing the Springboks.

AccoladesEdit

Muller was voted as one of the five Young Players of the Year for 1991, along with Hennie le Roux, Pieter Hendriks, Johan Nel and Jacques Olivier.

PersonalEdit

He is the brother of Helgard Muller, also former Springboks rugby player. Muller resides in Cape Town (Hout Bay) and is closely involved with the SA Rugby Legends.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Pieter Muller". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 4 November 2019.
  2. ^ "**EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW - PIETER MULLER**". 1876 Cardiff Rugby. Retrieved 4 November 2019.
  3. ^ Schoeman, Chris (2004). Vodacom who's who of South African rugby 2004 : a comprehensive guide to the South African players, officials, media and competitions (8th ed.). Cape Town: Who's Who of SA Rugby. p. 165. ISBN 0620261889. OCLC 56517006.
  4. ^ Jooste, Graham K. (1995). South African rugby test players 1949-1995. Johannesburg: Penguin. p. 125. ISBN 0140250174. OCLC 36916860.
  5. ^ Grieb, Eddie (2016). SOUTH AFRICAN RUGBY ANNUAL 2016. Cape Town: SOUTH AFRICAN RUGBY. p. 179. ISBN 978-0620692908. OCLC 957740131.

External linksEdit