Piano sonatas (Chopin)

Frédéric Chopin composed three piano sonatas, two being published in his lifetime, one posthumously. They are often considered to be among Chopin's most difficult piano compositions both musically and technically. They cover a period of time from 1828 to 1844, reflecting Chopin's style changes.

Piano Sonata No. 1 in C minor, Op. posth. 4Edit

Chopin composed this piano sonata in 1828, when he was still studying with Józef Elsner, to whom the sonata was dedicated. Despite having a low opus number, this work was published posthumously in 1851 by Tobias Haslinger's son. This work is among the least recorded of all Chopin's works.

MovementsEdit

This sonata has four movements.

  1. Allegro maestoso
  2. Menuetto
  3. Larghetto
  4. Finale: Presto

Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 35Edit

Chopin composed this sonata, popularly known as the “Funeral March,” in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata's popular common name, had been composed as early as 1837. This sonata is undoubtedly one of Chopin's most well known piano works, and was frequently performed in concert.

MovementsEdit

This sonata has four movements.

  1. Introduction: Grave - Doppio movimento
  2. Scherzo
  3. Marche funèbre: Lento
  4. Finale: Presto

Piano Sonata No. 3 in B minor, Op. 58Edit

Chopin composed this sonata in 1844 and dedicated it to Countess Emilie de Perthuis. As his last sonata for solo piano, it has been suggested[by whom?] that this was his attempt to address the criticisms of his earlier Sonata No. 2, Op. 35.

MovementsEdit

  1. Allegro maestoso
  2. Scherzo: Molto vivace
  3. Largo
  4. Finale: Presto non tanto; Agitato

ReferencesEdit

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