Phoenix City Council

The Phoenix City Council is the governing body of the city of Phoenix, Arizona. The council is made up of nine members, including a mayor and eight council members representing individual districts. While the mayor is elected in a citywide election, city council members are elected by votes only in the districts they represent, with both the mayor and council members serving four year terms.[1] The current mayor of Phoenix is Kate Gallego, a Democrat, who won the seat after defeating her former fellow-council member, Daniel Valenzuela in a run-off election in March of 2019.[2] In setting city policy and passing rules and regulations, the mayor and city council members each have equal voting power.[1]

Phoenix City Council
Type
Type
History
Founded1948
Leadership
Kate Gallego, Democratic
since March 2019
Structure
Seats9
Political groups
Minority
  •   Democratic[a]
    4 / 9 (44%)

Majority coalition

HistoryEdit

Before 1948, the city of Phoenix was governed by commission. In 1948, the system was changed to a city council with a mayor selected in a run-off election in non-partisan elections. In 1982, the election system was changed so that councilors represented districts.[3]

MembersEdit

District Council Members Party (officially nonpartisan)
Mayor Kate Gallego Democratic
District 1 Ann O'Brien Republican
District 2 Jim Waring Republican
District 3 Debra Stark Democratic
District 4 Laura Pastor Democratic
District 5 Betty Guardado Democratic
District 6 Sal DiCiccio Republican
District 7 Yassamin Ansari Democratic
District 8 Carlos Garcia Independent

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c City of Phoenix elections are officially non-partisan; party affiliations are informational only.
  1. ^ a b "Official Site of the City of Phoenix- About the Phoenix City Council". Phoenix.gov. Archived from the original on May 16, 2012. Retrieved June 19, 2012.
  2. ^ "Latest numbers: Kate Gallego wins big in race for Phoenix mayor". azcentral. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  3. ^ Dilworth, Richard (2011). Cities in American Political History. SAGE Publications. p. 608. ISBN 9780872899117. Retrieved 14 January 2016.