Pentateuch with Rashi's Commentary Translated into English

The Pentateuch with Rashi's Commentary Translated into English, was first published in London from 1929 to 1934 and is a scholarly English language translation of the full text of the Torah and Rashi's commentary on it. The five-volume work was produced and annotated by Rev. M. Rosenbaum and Dr Abraham M. Silbermann in collaboration with A. Blashki and L. Joseph.[1][2] The work has an extensive appendix of notes which display notable critical scholarship; the authors tackle difficult comments of Rashi. All the Hebrew text, including the Rashi, is in pointed non-Rashi font. The work is commonly known today as "Silberman's Rashi" (even though he was the second named co-author).

AuthorsEdit

Morris Rosenbaum (1871-1947) was a UK rabbi.[3][4] Abraham Morris (or Moritz) Silbermann (1889-1939) studied in Berlin and had settled in England, he was known for his 1927 German and English dictionary of the Talmud, Midrash and Targum (co-authored with Baruch Krupnik) and he was the publishing director of Shapiro, Valentine & Co.[5][6] Aaron Blashki and Louis Joseph were learned laymen[7][8] from Sydney, NSW.

HistoryEdit

The work was first published by the East End Jewish publisher Shapiro, Valentine & Co: Genesis in 1929 and finally Deuteronomy in 1934. The volumes were printed in Wittenberg. The contemporary academic reviews were positive, even enthusiastic.[9][10][11] The work is dedicated to Phillip Blashki and his wife Hannah.

The Silbermann family republished the work in collaboration with Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd in 1973.[12] In 2012 the Rashi translation was translated from English into German.[13]

 
Title page of the Leviticus volume

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Pentateuch with Targum Onkelos, Haphtaroth and Rashi's commentary / translated into English and annotated by M. Rosenbaum and A. M. Silbermann in collaboration with A. Blashki and L. Joseph". National Library of Israel. Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  2. ^ "Pentateuch: with targum onkelos, haphtaroth and prayers for sabbath and Rashi's commentary". Index Theologicus. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  3. ^ Everyman's Judaica. W. H. Allen, London. 1975. p. 511.
  4. ^ "Rosenbaum, M. (Morris), 1871-1947". Library of Congress. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  5. ^ Everyman's Judaica. W. H. Allen, London. 1975. p. 553.
  6. ^ "Silbermann, Abraham Moritz". www.encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  7. ^ "Rosenbaum and Silbermann". bibles.wikidot.com. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  8. ^ Apple, Raymond (June 2010). "Jewish scholarship in Sydney between the Wars: Part I". Australian Jewish Historical Society. 19: 4.
  9. ^ "Notices of Books". Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society. 62: 906–909. January 1933. doi:10.1017/S0035869X00071951.
  10. ^ "Notices of Books". Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society. 65: 140–141. January 1933. doi:10.1017/S0035869X00072592.
  11. ^ "Notices of Books". Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society. 67: 750. January 1935. doi:10.1017/S0035869X00095770.
  12. ^ "search "rashi-a-m-silbermann-m-rosenbaum"". Abebooks. Retrieved 21 August 2020.
  13. ^ "Rosenbaum and Silbermann". bibles.wikidot.com. Retrieved 24 August 2020.