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Peco is a UK-based manufacturer of model railway accessories, especially trackwork, based at Pecorama, Beer in South Devon, England.[1]

Peco Group of Companies
Private
IndustryHobbies
Founded1946
Headquarters,
Area served
Worldwide
ProductsModel railway products
SetrackStreamline and Individualay modular track components
Model scenery
Websitepeco-uk.com

Peco is the collective name for the Pritchard Patent Product Company Ltd, Peco Publications and Publicity Ltd, and Pecorama.[citation needed] Founded in 1946 in a small cottage, Peco now distributes worldwide.

ProductsEdit

The company supplies products for Z gauge, N gauge, 00 gauge, H0 gauge, 0 gauge, Gauge 1, and narrow gauge products for N6.5/Nn3, OO9, H0m, O16.5, SM32 and G scale.[2]

The primary product ranges are its track systems. Other product lines include Peco Trackside – building kits and scenic items in gauges O, OO and N – and a small range of rolling stock and locomotives, both kits and ready-to-run, for gauges N and OO9.[2]

Track systemsEdit

There are two main types of Peco track system: Peco Set-track and Peco Streamline.[citation needed] Set-track consists of a range of rigid curves, straights, crossings and points (turnouts), made to the standard British geometry. It is similar to the track components supplied with train-sets, and is designed for the needs of less-experienced modellers, or those experienced modellers who do not want to spend a lot of time building trackwork. However, where part of a desired layout cannot be built using Set-track parts, Streamline components can be utilised as required.

Peco Streamline is for the more experienced modeller.[3] The range includes a wider variety of points and crossings, at different radii. Most of these are available with 'live' (metal) or insulating (plastic) frogs. The "Electrofrog" points require more complex wiring, to avoid short-circuits, but are designed to give more reliable operation of locomotives. There are no other rigid track components. Plain track is supplied in 3 foot (914 mm) lengths (2 foot for Z gauge), to be cut to length as required. It is flexible (laterally), allowing the modeller to use it for straight track or any radius curve, to suit the needs of the model. The Streamline range is supplied with different types of rail, identified by code numbers indicating the height of the rail in thousands-of-an-inch. For 00/H0 track, 'Code 100' rail is the original type, and is designed for older ready-to-run models. 'Code 83' is designed to be compatible with North American track systems. 'Code 75' is designed for 'fine-scale' models, with smaller wheel flanges, to give a more-scale appearance. N gauge Streamline track comes in code 80 and code 55.

The 00/H0 track is scaled for H0; this is commercially understandable as the product range is supplied to the smaller UK market (mainly 00) and larger European / US markets (mainly H0).[3] The sleeper length, sleeper spacing and set-track '6 foot way' is not correct for modeling UK track in 00 gauge and this can exaggerate the error in the gauge when running 00 models.

To support the track systems, "Pecolectrics" is the company brand name for Peco's range of electronic control systems, point motors and switches.[2]

Wholly owned subsidiariesEdit

Peco as a company owns several other well-known model companies:[2]

  • Ratio
  • K & M Trees
  • Wills
  • Modelscene (formerly 'Merit')

PublicationsEdit

Peco Publications and Publicity Ltd publishes the monthly magazines Railway Modeller and Continental Modeller, as well as a large range of booklets explaining wiring, scenics, baseboard construction, outdoor railways, and similar topics.

PecoramaEdit

Pecorama is a tourist attraction, and includes a display of many model railways, a shop, and the Beer Heights Light Railway. It is located in the village of Beer, Devon.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "British Manufacturers – Peco". Tela Design. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d Peco Model Railways Catalogue (2019). Pritchard Patent Product Co. Ltd. p. 174.
  3. ^ a b "FAQs". PECO. 2019. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  4. ^ "Pecorama". Seaton Bay. Archived from the original on 4 September 2014. Retrieved 26 August 2014.

External linksEdit