Open main menu

A pawn storm is a chess strategy in which several pawns are moved in rapid succession toward the opponent's defenses.[1] A pawn storm usually involves adjacent pawns on one side of the board, the queenside (a-, b-, and c-files) or the kingside (f-, g-, and h-files).

Contents


ExamplesEdit

A pawn storm will often be directed toward the opponent's king after it has castled toward one side (e.g. FischerLarsen, 1958[2]). Successive advances of the pawns on that side might rapidly cramp and overwhelm the opponent's position.

Fischer vs. Petrosian, Yugoslavia 1959
abcdefgh
8
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8
77
66
55
44
33
22
11
abcdefgh
Position after 43.Qc4[3]


A pawn storm might also be directed at queening a passed pawn; the diagram is taken from a game in which Tigran Petrosian was playing the black pieces against Bobby Fischer. Over the next fourteen moves, Petrosian storms his twin pawns down the a- and b- files, forcing Fischer's resignation.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pandolfini, Bruce (1995). Chess Thinking. Simon & Schuster. p. 179. ISBN 0-671-79502-3.
  2. ^ Fischer vs. Larsen, 1958 Chessgames.com
  3. ^ Fischer vs. Petrosian, Bled-Zagreb-Belgrade Candidates (1959) Chessgames.com