Pavel Tsatsouline

Pavel Tsatsouline, (Belarusian: Павел Цацулін, romanizedPaveł Caculin; born 23 August 1969 in Minsk, USSR) is the Chairman of StrongFirst, Inc., a fitness instructor who has introduced SPETSNAZ training techniques from the former Soviet Union to US Navy SEALs , Marines and Army Special Forces, and shortly thereafter to the American public.[1]

Pavel Tsatsouline
Born
Pavel Tsatsouline

(1969-08-23) 23 August 1969 (age 50)
Alma materBelarusian State University of Physical Training
OccupationPersonal Trainer

Tsatsouline is particularly notable for popularizing the kettlebell in the modern era in the West, most notably through his books and through a series of instructional videos, delivered with his trademark comedic intent, comically exploiting Russian stereotypes with a thick accent, a dungeon-esque setting, and frequent use of the word "comrade". Vic Sussman among others praised Tsatsouline's videos because their power as training tools in part stemmed from the emphasis on kettlebells as fun. Pavel's strength training exercises were soley focused on practial strength and mobility.[2] For him bigger did not always mean stronger.[3]

He holds a degree in Sports Science from the Physical Culture Institute in Minsk.[4] He is involved with the evolving field of martial arts fitness and is a proponent of the kettlebell as an exercise and strengthening tool. In 1998, Tsatsouline became a kettlebell instructor in the United States.[5]

Tsatsouline claims to have been a PT drill instructor for Spetsnaz, the elite Soviet special forces unit, during the late 1980s (when Tsatsouline was in his teenage years).[6][7]

In 2001, Tsatsouline was voted a "Hot Trainer" by Rolling Stone, pictured with a kettlebell in hand.[8]He was considered the father of the kettle bell and popularized the usage of kettle bell exercise to increase strength.[9] He has published articles in Milo magazine[10] and Performance Press, as well as being the author of several books on stretching and strength training (see Bibliography).

In 2012, Pavel left the RKC and formed a new company, StrongFirst.[11]

Selected bibliographyEdit

Publications that were (and remain) important to the normalization of kettlebell and other spetsnaz strength training techniques being adopted into American Gym culture are listed below:

  • Power to the People!: Russian Strength Training Secrets for Every American (2000). ISBN 0-938045-19-9.
  • Bullet-Proof Abs (2000). ISBN 0-938045-25-3.
  • The Russian Kettlebell Challenge (2001). ISBN 0-938045-32-6.
  • Relax into Stretch: Instant Flexibility Through Mastering Muscle Tension (2001). ISBN 0-938045-28-8.
  • From Russia with Tough Love: Pavel's Kettlebell Workout for a Femme Fatale (2002). ISBN 0-938045-43-1.
  • The Naked Warrior (2003). ISBN 0-938045-55-5.
  • Beyond Bodybuilding (2005). ISBN 0-938045-66-0.
  • Enter the Kettlebell (2006). ISBN 0-938045-69-5.
  • Hardstyle Abs (2012). ISBN 0-938045-50-4.
  • Kettlebell Simple and Sinister (2013). ISBN 0-989892-40-9.
  • The Quick and the Dead (2019). ISBN 978-0-9898924-2-1.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Goode, Stephen. "An 'Evil Russian' Trains The Marines: Pavel Tsatsouline, Once an Instructor for Soviet Special-Forces Units That Fought in Afghanistan, Now Teaches Martial Arts to the Corps at the Quantico Marine Base". Insight. Retrieved 15 January 2013.
  2. ^ Nation, Chris Shugart, T. "The Evil Russian Speaks - Part 1". T NATION. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  3. ^ Brnas, Zvonimir (2019-02-16). "Pavel Tsatsoulines Foundations of Strength Training". BJJ Spot. Retrieved 2019-12-16.
  4. ^ Goode, Stephen. "Pavel Tsatsouline Interview". Insight on the News. Retrieved 8 December 2015.
  5. ^ "2012 Teleseminar Interview #4 - Pavel Tsatsouline". Sports Rehab Expert. Retrieved 8 December 2015.
  6. ^ Goode, Stephen. "An 'Evil Russian' Trains The Marines: Pavel Tsatsouline, Once an Instructor for Soviet Special-Forces Units That Fought in Afghanistan, Now Teaches Martial Arts to the Corps at the Quantico Marine Base". Insight. Retrieved 15 January 2013.
  7. ^ Shugart, Chris. "The Evil Russian Speaks - Part 1". T Nation. Retrieved 1 August 2017.
  8. ^ Rolling Stone. August 30, 2001, page 95
  9. ^ Tatman, Sandra L. (2011-06-02). Chicago Tribune Competition. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/gao/9781884446054.article.t2094123.
  10. ^ "MILO Articles by Topic: General weight training and fitness: Pavel Tsatsouline". MILO: A Journal for Serious Strength Athletes. Archived from the original on 2007-10-15. Retrieved 2007-11-07.
  11. ^ "SFG I Kettlebell Certification Information". StrongFirst. 2015-10-26. Retrieved 2017-08-20.

External linksEdit

  • "About Pavel". Dragon Door Publications. 2003. Retrieved 2007-11-07.