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Pauline Betz Addie (née Pauline May Betz, August 6, 1919 – May 31, 2011[1]) was an American professional tennis player. She won five Grand Slam singles titles and was the runner-up on three other occasions. Jack Kramer has called her the second best female tennis player he ever saw, behind Helen Wills Moody.[2]

Pauline Betz Addie
Pauline Betz smoking ad.jpg
Betz in 1949
Full namePauline May Betz Addie
ITF namePauline Addie
Country (sports) United States
Born(1919-08-06)August 6, 1919
Dayton, Ohio, U.S.
DiedMay 31, 2011(2011-05-31) (aged 91)
Potomac, Maryland, U.S.
Height1.66 m (5 ft 5 in)
Turned pro1947
Retired1960[1]
Int. Tennis HoF1965 (member page)
Singles
Highest rankingNo. 1 (1946)
Grand Slam Singles results
French OpenF (1946)
WimbledonW (1946)
US OpenW (1942, 1943, 1944, 1946)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
French OpenF (1946)
WimbledonF (1946)
US OpenF (1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
French OpenW (1946)
US OpenF (1941, 1943)
Team competitions
Wightman CupW (1946)

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Betz attended Los Angeles High School and learned her tennis from Dick Skeen. She continued her tennis and education at Rollins College (graduating in 1943),[3][4][5][6] where she was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. Betz earned an MA in economics from Columbia University.[7][8]

CareerEdit

Betz won the first of her four singles titles at the U.S. Championships in 1942, saving a match point in the semifinals against Margaret Osborne while trailing 3–5 in the final set.[9] The following year, she won the Tri-State tournament in Cincinnati, Ohio, defeating Catherine Wolf in the final 6–0, 6–2 without losing a point in the first set,[9] a "golden set". She won the Wimbledon singles title in 1946, the only time she entered the tournament, without losing a set.[9] At the 1946 French Championships, held that year after Wimbledon, she lost the final in three sets to Margaret Osborne after failing to convert two match points.[10]

Her amateur career ended in 1947 when the USLTA revoked her amateur status for exploring the possibilities of turning professional.[9][11][12][13] Betz played two professional tours of matches against Sarah Palfrey Cooke (1947) and Gussie Moran (1951).[10]

According to John Olliff of The Daily Telegraph and The Daily Mail, Addie was ranked World No. 1 in 1946 (no rankings issued from 1940 through 1945).[10] She was included in the year-end top ten rankings issued by the United States Lawn Tennis Association from 1939 through 1946. She was the top ranked U.S. player from 1942 through 1944 and in 1946.[14]

Awards and honorsEdit

On September 2, 1946 Betz appeared on the cover of TIME magazine.[15][16] Betz was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1965.[9] In 1995 she was inducted in the ITA Women's Collegiate Tennis Hall of Fame.[7] The Pauline Betz Addie Tennis Center at Cabin John Regional Park in Potomac, Maryland was renamed in her honor on May 1, 2008. Addie, Albert Ritzenberg, and Stanly Hoffberger founded the center in 1972.[17]

Grand Slam finalsEdit

Singles (5 titles, 3 runners-up)Edit

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1941 U.S. Championships Grass   Sarah Palfrey Cooke 5–7, 2–6
Winner 1942 U.S. Championships Grass   Louise Brough 4–6, 6–1, 6–4
Winner 1943 U.S. Championships (2) Grass   Louise Brough 6–3, 5–7, 6–3
Winner 1944 U.S. Championships (3) Grass   Margaret Osborne 6–3, 8–6
Runner-up 1945 U.S. Championships Grass   Sarah Palfrey Cooke 6–3, 6–8, 4–6
Winner 1946 Wimbledon Grass   Louise Brough 6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 1946 French Championships Clay   Margaret Osborne 6–2, 6–8, 5–7
Winner 1946 U.S. Championships (4) Grass   Doris Hart 11–9, 6–3

Doubles: 7 (7 runner-ups)Edit

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1941 U.S. Championships Grass   Dorothy Bundy   Sarah Palfrey
  Margaret Osborne
6–3, 1–6, 4–6
Runner-up 1942 U.S. Championships Grass   Doris Hart   Louise Brough
  Margaret Osborne
6–2, 5–7, 0–6
Runner-up 1943 U.S. Championships Grass   Doris Hart   Louise Brough
  Margaret Osborne
4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 1944 U.S. Championships Grass   Doris Hart   Louise Brough
  Margaret Osborne
6–4, 4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 1945 U.S. Championships Grass   Doris Hart   Louise Brough
  Margaret Osborne
3–6, 3–6
Runner-up 1946 Wimbledon Grass   Doris Hart   Louise Brough
  Margaret Osborne
3–6, 6–2, 3–6
Runner-up 1946 French Championships Clay   Doris Hart   Louise Brough
  Margaret Osborne
4–6, 6–0, 1–6

Mixed Doubles: 3 (1 title, 2 runner-ups)Edit

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1941 U.S. Championships Grass   Bobby Riggs   Sarah Palfrey
  Jack Kramer
6–4, 4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 1943 U.S. Championships Grass   Pancho Segura   Margaret Osborne
  Bill Talbert
8–10, 4–6
Winner 1946 French Championships Clay   Budge Patty   Dorothy Bundy
  Tom Brown
7–5, 9–7

Grand Slam singles tournament timelineEdit

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A NH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)
Tournament 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 19461 Career SR
Australian Championships A A NH NH NH NH NH A 0 / 0
French Championships A NH R R R R A F 0 / 1
Wimbledon A NH NH NH NH NH NH W 1 / 1
U.S. Championships 1R QF F W W W F W 4 / 8
SR 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 1 1 / 1 1 / 1 1 / 1 0 / 1 2 / 3 5 / 10

R = tournament restricted to French nationals and held under German occupation. SR = the ratio of the number of Grand Slam singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played.

1In 1946, the French Championships were held after Wimbledon.

Personal lifeEdit

In 1949 Betz published an autobiography titled Wings on my Tennis Shoes.[18][16] That same year she married Bob Addie, a sportswriter for the Washington Times-Herald and Washington Post.[1][9] The couple had five children, including poet and novelist Kim Addonizio, Rusty, Gary, Jon and Rick.[1][12] Her granddaughter Aya Cash is an actress. Pauline Betz Addie died in her sleep on May 31, 2011, aged 91.[1]

RecordsEdit

Tournament Year Record accomplished Player tied
Tri-State tournament 1943 Achieved a Golden Set[19] Tine Scheuer-Larsen (1995)
Yaroslava Shvedova (2012)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Robin Finn (June 2, 2011). "Pauline Betz Addie, a Dominant Tennis Champion, Dies at 91". The New York Times.
  2. ^ Female players & the 1950–51 Pauline Betz-Gussy Moran tour
  3. ^ "ITA Women's Hall of Fame..." ITA Women's Hall of Fame McCormack-Nagelsen Tennis Center, William & Mary College. Archived from the original on August 23, 2010. Retrieved October 6, 2010.
  4. ^ "Rollins College Athletics Hall of Fame". Rollins College Athletics Department. Archived from the original on May 28, 2010. Retrieved October 6, 2010.
  5. ^ "Rollins College Women's Tennis: Small School With A Big Tradition". Sports Then and Now. Retrieved October 6, 2010.
  6. ^ "Tennis-Women's: Tradition". Rollins College Athletics Department. Archived from the original on July 15, 2011. Retrieved October 6, 2010.
  7. ^ a b "Pauline Betz Addie". Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA).
  8. ^ Harold Parrott (September 7, 1943). "Hunt, blocked by Riggs, emulates dad as champion". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Pauline May Betz profile (Addie), tennisfame.com; accessed November 25, 2016.
  10. ^ a b c Collins, Bud (2008). The Bud Collins History of Tennis: An Authoritative Encyclopedia and Record Book. New York: New Chapter Press. pp. 695, 702. ISBN 0-942257-41-3.
  11. ^ "Pauline Betz". The Telegraph. June 5, 2011.
  12. ^ a b Richard Evans (20 June 2011). "Pauline Betz obituary". The Guardian.
  13. ^ "Betz undecided on future plans". Spartanburg Herald-Journal. AP. April 10, 1947. p. 13.
  14. ^ United States Tennis Association (1988). 1988 Official USTA Tennis Yearbook. Lynn, Massachusetts: H.O. Zimman, Inc. pp. 260–1.
  15. ^ "Pauline Betz". TIME.
  16. ^ a b Martin Childs (June 17, 2011). "Pauline Betz: Grand slam-winning tennis player banned for merely considering turning professional". The Independent.
  17. ^ "Pauline Betz Addie". Sidwell Friends School. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  18. ^ "Wings on my tennis shoes". www.worldcat.org. Worldcat.
  19. ^ Politiken, 10 May 1995, 1st Section, p.10

External linksEdit