Paul Zsolnay Verlag

Paul Zsolnay Verlag is an Austrian publishing company.

In the 1920 and 1930s, Paul Zsolnay Verlag published yearbooks containing new pieces, excerpts from the catalogue, felicitations, and other material.

OverviewEdit

The company was created in 1923 by Paul Zsolnay.[1] It was the most successful publishing company during the interwar period, publishing authors such as John Galsworthy, H. G. Wells, Pearl S. Buck, A. J. Cronin, Franz Werfel, Felix Salten, Robert Neumann, Roda Roda, Hilde Spiel, Ernst Lothar, Hans Kaltneker, Friedrich Torberg, Leo Perutz, Heinrich Mann, Kasimir Edschmid, Carl Sternheim, Emil Ludwig, Walter von Molo, and Frank Thiess.[1]

Nazi eraEdit

After Austria's Anschluss with Nazi Germany in 1938, the publishing house's owner, Paul Zsolnay, was subject to Nazi anti-Jewish restrictions. After initial attempts to "trick" the Nazis by utilizing an “Aryan” titular head to his firm, he fled to London. The Gestapo closed the publishing house in April 1939, until the non-Jewish bookseller Karl H. Bischoff took over.[2][3]

In London, Zsolnay worked for the British publisher Heinemann, helping to set up the imprint Heinemann & Zsolnay. Paul Zsolnay lived in England from 1938 to 1946.[1]

PostwarEdit

When Zsolnay returned to Vienna in 1946, he recovered the business and renamed it the Heinemann & Zsolnay Verlag,[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Hall, Murray G.: “Publishers and Institutions in Austria, 1918–45”, pp. 79–80. A History of Austrian Literature 1918–2000 (Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture). Katrin Kohl (ed.), Ritchie Robertson (ed.), Camden House Inc., 2006. Online.
  2. ^ "The Compromise of Return: Viennese Jews after the Holocaust" (PDF). The Paul Zsolnay Verlag had been one of the most successful publishing houses in Viennaduring the interwar years. Owner Paul Zsolnay had tricked the Nazis fora short while after the Anschluss by utilizing an “Aryan” titular head to hisfirm, and in 1938, he fled to safety in London. Despite his efforts and thoseof his gentile colleague, the Gestapo investigated his business and closed his shop in April 1939, and the bookseller Karl H. Bischoff eventually took over the Paul Zsolnay Verlag.39 In London, Zsolnay worked for the British publisher Heinemann, where he advanced quickly and eventually helped set up the imprint Heinemann & Zsolnay. When he returned to Vienna in 1946, he regained his business and renamed it the Heinemann & Zsolnay Verlag{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ "Lost Art Internet Database - Jüdische Sammler und Kunsthändler (Opfer nationalsozialistischer Verfolgung und Enteignung) - Zsolnay, Paul". www.lostart.de. Retrieved 2021-11-08.

External linksEdit