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Patrick Maroon (born April 23, 1988) is an American professional ice hockey left winger who is currently an unrestricted free agent. He most recently played for the St. Louis Blues of the National Hockey League (NHL). He has previously played in the NHL for the Anaheim Ducks, Edmonton Oilers and New Jersey Devils. Maroon won the Stanley Cup in 2019 with the Blues.

Patrick Maroon
Patrick Maroon 2016.jpg
Maroon with Team USA in 2016
Born (1988-04-23) April 23, 1988 (age 31)
St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.
Height 6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Weight 220 lb (100 kg; 15 st 10 lb)
Position Left wing
Shoots Left
NHL team
Former teams
Arizona Coyotes
Anaheim Ducks
Edmonton Oilers
New Jersey Devils
St. Louis Blues
National team  United States
NHL Draft 161st overall, 2007
Philadelphia Flyers
Playing career 2008–present

Contents

Playing careerEdit

As a youth, Maroon played in the 2002 Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournament with the St. Louis Blues minor ice hockey team.[1]

Philadelphia FlyersEdit

Maroon was drafted by the Philadelphia Flyers in the sixth round, 161st overall, in the 2007 NHL Entry Draft. He was assigned to the Flyers American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate team, the Adirondack Phantoms in 2007, but spent the season with the junior London Knights of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL) before joining the Phantoms.[2]

During the summer of 2010, Maroon led the United States men's national inline hockey team to a gold medal performance at the 2010 IIHF InLine Hockey World Championship.[2] He scored 7 goals and 14 points in 6 games at the in-line worlds including a goal and an assist in the gold medal game in Karlstad, Sweden, against the Czech Republic.[3]

After nine games of the 2010–11 season, Maroon led Adirondack in scoring with five goals. He was expected to make the jump to the NHL with the Flyers that year, but on October 30, 2010, he was suddenly dismissed from the Phantoms for an undisclosed incident.[4] Later articles indicated the team was unhappy with Maroon's lack of conditioning.[2]

Anaheim DucksEdit

Three weeks later, on November 21, 2010, Philadelphia traded Maroon and David Laliberté to the Anaheim Ducks in exchange for forward Rob Bordson and defenseman Danny Syvret.[5]

Shortly after the trade, Maroon was assigned to Anaheim's AHL affiliate, the Syracuse Crunch. He scored 11 minutes 10 seconds into his first game with the Crunch, with which he scored 21 goals and 48 points in 57 games.[3]

The 2013–14 season was Maroon's first full season in the NHL. He appeared in 62 games, scoring 11 goals to go with 18 assists and despite having a year to run on his contract was signed to a three-year contract extension on August 2, 2014.[6] He would appear in 71 games in his next season, scoring 9 goals with 25 assists. His offensive game came alive in the 2015 Stanley Cup playoffs, scoring 8 goals in 16 games while playing on the Ducks' top line.[2] Maroon's ability to create time and space for his linemates Ryan Getzlaf and Corey Perry by his hard work and fierce battles in the corners, led to his playoff production increasing as he found himself open in key moments of the series and he capitalized by lighting the lamp.

In the 2015–16 season, Maroon found himself playing with the fourth line for the Ducks at the beginning of the season. At times his play was exemplary and other times he often saw his ice time drop to below ten minutes a game. He was reunited with Corey Perry and found his scoring touch, picking up consecutive points in consecutive games, while scoring just 4 goals and 13 points in 56 games.

Edmonton OilersEdit

On February 29, 2016, Maroon was traded to the Edmonton Oilers in exchange for Martin Gernát and a fourth-round pick in the 2016 NHL Entry Draft.[2] In his first four games as an Oiler, Maroon scored two goals and two assists.

In the first game of the 2016–17 season on October 12, Maroon scored the first goal in the Oilers' new arena, Rogers Place, in a 7–4 victory over the Calgary Flames.[7] On January 5, 2017, Maroon scored his first career NHL hat-trick in a 4–3 win over the Boston Bruins.[8]

On January 3, 2018, Maroon was suspended for two games for interfering against Los Angeles Kings defenseman Drew Doughty.[9]

New Jersey DevilsEdit

On February 26, 2018, Maroon was traded to the New Jersey Devils in exchange for J. D. Dudek and a third-round pick in the 2019 NHL Entry Draft.[10]

St. Louis BluesEdit

On July 10, 2018, Maroon signed a one-year, $1.75 million contract with his hometown St. Louis Blues.[11] In 78 regular season games, Maroon scored 10 goals to go with 18 assists for 28 points.

The Blues qualified for the 2019 Stanley Cup playoffs as the 3rd seed from the Central Division, capping a remarkable turnaround in a campaign that saw them in last place in the NHL as late as January of 2019. They faced the Winnipeg Jets in the first round, and won the series in six games.

In Game 7 of the second round match-up against the Dallas Stars, he scored the game winning goal in double overtime to give the Blues a 4-3 series win.[12] On June 12, Maroon and the Blues won the Stanley Cup for the first time in franchise history, defeating the Boston Bruins in seven games. He finished the playoffs with seven points.

Personal lifeEdit

Maroon is engaged to his fiancée Francesca Vangel.[13] He also has a son.[14] Maroon was born and raised in St. Louis,[2] and attended Oakville High School.[15] After his game-winning goal, the Oakville High band played a version of the Blues' unofficial victory song, "Gloria," in his honor.[16]

Career statisticsEdit

Regular season and playoffsEdit

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2005–06 Texarkana Bandits NAHL 57 23 37 60 61
2006–07 St. Louis Bandits NAHL 57 40 55 95 152
2007–08 London Knights OHL 64 35 55 90 57 5 0 1 1 10
2007–08 Philadelphia Phantoms AHL 1 0 0 0 0
2008–09 Philadelphia Phantoms AHL 80 23 31 54 62 4 1 2 3 13
2009–10 Adirondack Phantoms AHL 67 11 33 44 125
2010–11 Adirondack Phantoms AHL 9 5 3 8 30
2010–11 Syracuse Crunch AHL 57 21 27 48 68
2011–12 Syracuse Crunch AHL 75 32 42 74 120 4 0 0 0 4
2011–12 Anaheim Ducks NHL 2 0 0 0 2
2012–13 Norfolk Admirals AHL 64 26 24 50 139
2012–13 Anaheim Ducks NHL 13 2 1 3 10
2013–14 Anaheim Ducks NHL 62 11 18 29 101 13 2 5 7 38
2014–15 Anaheim Ducks NHL 71 9 25 34 82 16 7 4 11 6
2015–16 Anaheim Ducks NHL 56 4 9 13 54
2015–16 Edmonton Oilers NHL 16 8 6 14 34
2016–17 Edmonton Oilers NHL 81 27 15 42 95 13 3 5 8 28
2017–18 Edmonton Oilers NHL 57 14 16 30 60
2017–18 New Jersey Devils NHL 16 3 10 13 11 5 1 0 1 0
2018–19 St. Louis Blues NHL 74 10 18 28 64 26 3 4 7 8
NHL totals 448 88 118 206 515 73 16 18 34 80

InternationalEdit

Year Team Event Result GP G A Pts PIM
2016 United States WC 4th 10 1 2 3 12
Senior totals 10 1 2 3 12

Awards and honorsEdit

Award Year
NAHL
All-Rookie First Team 2006
First All-Star Team 2007
MVP 2007
NHL
Stanley Cup (St. Louis Blues) 2019 [17]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Pee-Wee players who have reached NHL or WHA" (PDF). Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournament. 2018. Retrieved 2019-02-15.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Prewitt, Alex (March 1, 2017). "Gentle giant Patrick Maroon finally finding his way with the Oilers". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved March 3, 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Patrick Maroon's long, strange journey to NHL playoff stardom". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2015-05-26.
  4. ^ HockeyBuzz.com – Bill Meltzer – Flyers Gameday w/ Updates: 10/30/10 vs Islanders
  5. ^ "Flyers, ducks complete four-player trade". The Sports Network. 2010-11-21. Retrieved 2010-11-21.
  6. ^ "Ducks sign Maroon to three-year contract extension". Anaheim Ducks. 2014-08-02. Retrieved 2014-08-02.
  7. ^ "Oilers open new arena with big win over Flames". cbc.ca. October 13, 2016. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  8. ^ "Ducks create forward opening for pickups by trading Patrick Maroon to Oilers". OC Register. 2016-02-29. Retrieved 2016-02-29.
  9. ^ "Oilers' Patrick Maroon suspended two games for hit on Drew Doughty". sportsnet.ca. January 3, 2018. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  10. ^ "Devils acquire Patrick Maroon from Edmonton". NHL.com. February 26, 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  11. ^ "Blues sign forward Maroon to one-year deal". The Sports Network. 2018-07-10. Retrieved 2018-07-10.
  12. ^ "Maroon's 2OT goal lifts Blues past Stars in Game 7". TSN.ca. May 7, 2019. Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  13. ^ Mosleh, Omar (January 4, 2018). "Partner of Oilers player says she's faced online harassment after player suspended". Metro News. Retrieved March 10, 2018.
  14. ^ "Patrick Maroon cries watching son's reaction to goal". NHL.com. December 19, 2016. Retrieved March 10, 2018.
  15. ^ Masterson, Sam (December 20, 2016). "St. Louis Native Cries In Interview After Scoring With Family In The Stands". stlouis.cbslocal.com. Retrieved June 4, 2018. Maroon is a graduate of Oakville High School
  16. ^ "Gloria! Oakville High School band plays 'Gloria' in honor of alum and Blues star Pat Maroon". KSDK. May 8, 2019.
  17. ^ "Blues win cup for first time, defeat Bruins in Game 7 of final". National Hockey League. June 12, 2019. Retrieved June 12, 2019.

External linksEdit