Pat McGrady

Patrick Michael McGrady (1908–1979) was an Irish-American journalist. He is known for his anti-fascist writings in the Jewish Daily Bulletin in the 1930s and from 1947 as science editor for the American Cancer Society.

Pat McGrady
Patrick Michael McGrady.jpg
Born1908
Anaconda, Montana
Died1979
NationalityAmerican
OccupationJournalist
Known for
  • "This Fascist Racket" (1934)
  • The Savage Cell (1964)
  • The Persecuted Drug: The Story of DMSO (1973)

Early life and familyEdit

Patrick McGrady was born in 1908 in Anaconda, Montana,[1][2] to James and Mary McGrady. He married Grace H. Robinson in New York in 1937.[3]

JournalismEdit

In the early 1930s, McGrady was a reporter for the China Press.[4] Later he was a staff writer for the Associated Press in New York. He was also known for his anti-fascist writings, particularly his 1934 series "This Fascist Racket" for New York's Jewish Telegraphic Agency paper, the Jewish Daily Bulletin. His survey of fascist organizations in the United States, Fascism in America (1934), was the result of a year's study in Germany and America.[5] He covered the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Lindbergh Trial in 1935.[6]

World War IIEdit

During the Second World War, McGrady was an air combat intelligence officer with the U.S. Marine Corps.[7]

American Cancer SocietyEdit

From 1949 to 1973 McGrady was science editor for the American Cancer Society. He wrote The Savage Cell: A report on cancer and cancer research that was published in 1964, and in 1973 The Persecuted Drug: The Story of DMSO which the U.S. government tried to suppress.[8]

DeathEdit

McGrady died in 1979, having suffered from colon cancer.[6]

Selected publicationsEdit

  • Fascism in America. Jewish Daily Bulletin, New York, 1934.
  • "This Fascist Racket" – series in Jewish Daily Bulletin, 1934.
  • The Savage Cell: A report on cancer and cancer research. Basic Books, New York, 1964.
  • The Persecuted Drug: The Story of DMSO. Doubleday, New York, 1973. ISBN 0385089317

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The Talk of the Town", The New Yorker, 9 June 1934, p. 11. Retrieved 31 January 2020.
  2. ^ Patrick M Mcgrady New York, New York Passenger and Crew Lists, 1909, 1925-1957. Family Search. Retrieved 31 January 2020. (subscription required)
  3. ^ Patrick Michael Mcgrady New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1829-1940. Family Search. Retrieved 31 January 2020. (subscription required)
  4. ^ "Washington C H Herald Archives, Mar 28, 1932, p. 3". NewspaperArchive.com. 1932-03-28. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  5. ^ Fascism in America, Jewish Daily Bulletin, 11 July 1934, p. 4.
  6. ^ a b Patrick McGrady, 1932-2003: Cancer fighter, journalist had passion for life. Julie Davidow, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 16 December 2003. Retrieved 31 December 2020. (subscription required)
  7. ^ "A Series That May Save Your Life", Southern Illinoisan, 4 April 1965, p. 28. Retrieved from newspapers.com 31 January 2020. (subscription required)
  8. ^ "McGradys will win this one", James J. Kilpatrick, The Parsons Sun, 17 November 1981, p. 6. Retrieved from newspapers.com 31 January 2020. (subscription required)

External linksEdit