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Park County is a county in the U.S. state of Wyoming. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 28,205.[1] The county seat is Cody.[2]

Park County, Wyoming
Park county wyoming courthouse.jpg
Park County Courthouse in Cody
Flag of Park County, Wyoming
Flag
Map of Wyoming highlighting Park County
Location within the U.S. state of Wyoming
Map of the United States highlighting Wyoming
Wyoming's location within the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 15, 1909 (established)
1911 (organized)
Named forYellowstone National Park
SeatCody
Largest cityCody
Area
 • Total6,967 sq mi (18,044 km2)
 • Land6,942 sq mi (17,980 km2)
 • Water25 sq mi (65 km2), 0.4%
Population (est.)
 • (2017)29,568
 • Density4.1/sq mi (1.6/km2)
Congressional districtAt-large
Time zoneMountain: UTC−7/−6
Websitewww.parkcounty.us

Park County is a mecca for tourists. The county has over 53 percent of Yellowstone National Park's land area.[3] Many attractions abound, including the Buffalo Bill Historical Center, the Cody Stampede Rodeo, and the western museum, Old Trail Town.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Wyoming gained separate territorial status in 1868. Before that, most of the state's area was included in either Laramie County (part of the Dakota Territory) or as unorganized territory within the Dakota Territory. Wyoming Territory was established on July 25, 1868, at which time Laramie County was assigned to this jurisdiction. The area now known as Park County was established as Carter County, then Sweetwater County. In 1884 it was assigned to Fremont County; this continued until 1896, when it was assigned to Big Horn County.

Wyoming achieved statehood in 1890. The area of present-day Park Continued as part of Big Horn County until 1909, when Park County was authorized. The county governing structure was put in place during 1911;[4] a courthouse was constructed 1911–1912. An addition to the building was completed in 1983, and the complete building was restored in 1985. [5] The county was named for Yellowstone National Park which is mostly within the limits of Park County.[6]

In 1913, Hot Springs County was created from portions of Park County, Big Horn County, and Fremont County. Park County also had minor boundary adjustments in 1929 and 1931, but otherwise its boundaries have remained unchanged.

GeographyEdit

Much of Park County is held under state or federal control. Most of the Shoshone National Forest, the first national forest, and a portion of Yellowstone National Park, the first national park, fall within Park County boundaries. Three rivers flow through Park County: the Greybull and Shoshone Rivers which are tributaries to the Big Horn River, and the Clark's Fork River which flows into the Yellowstone River.[5]

According to the US Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 6,967 square miles (18,040 km2), of which 6,942 square miles (17,980 km2) is land and 25 square miles (65 km2) (0.4%) is water.[7]

Adjacent countiesEdit

National protected areasEdit

Major highwaysEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
19104,909
19207,29848.7%
19308,20712.5%
194010,97633.7%
195015,18238.3%
196016,87411.1%
197017,7525.2%
198021,63921.9%
199023,1787.1%
200025,78611.3%
201028,2059.4%
Est. 201729,568[8]4.8%
US Decennial Census[9]
1870–2000[10] 2010–2016[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the 2000 United States Census,[11] there were 25,786 people, 10,312 households, and 7,094 families in the county. The population density was 4 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 11,869 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.46% White, 0.09% Black or African American, 0.47% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.41% from other races, and 1.08% from two or more races. 3.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 26.3% were of German and 13.3% English ancestry.

There were 10,312 households out of which 30.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.90% were married couples living together, 7.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.20% were non-families. 26.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.92.

The county population contained 24.40% under the age of 18, 9.10% from 18 to 24, 25.20% from 25 to 44, 26.70% from 45 to 64, and 14.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 95.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,829, and the median income for a family was $41,406. Males had a median income of $33,452 versus $20,500 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,020. About 8.40% of families and 12.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.60% of those under age 18 and 8.30% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 28,205 people, 11,885 households, and 7,777 families in the county.[12] The population density was 4.1 inhabitants per square mile (1.6/km2). There were 13,562 housing units at an average density of 2.0 per square mile (0.77/km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 95.6% white, 0.6% Asian, 0.6% American Indian, 0.2% black or African American, 0.1% Pacific islander, 1.4% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.8% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 31.7% were German, 16.3% were English, 15.4% were Irish, and 6.3% were American.[14]

Of the 11,885 households, 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.6% were non-families, and 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 2.81. The median age was 43.6 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $46,637 and the median income for a family was $58,297. Males had a median income of $40,036 versus $27,450 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,203. About 5.5% of families and 9.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.2% of those under age 18 and 6.4% of those age 65 or over.[15]

CommunitiesEdit

CitiesEdit

TownsEdit

Census-designated placesEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

Former communitiesEdit

PoliticsEdit

Like almost all of Wyoming, Park County is overwhelmingly Republican. It was most recently carried by a Democrat in 1964 when Lyndon Johnson beat Barry Goldwater by forty-seven votes. Since then, no Democrat has passed thirty-one percent of the county’s vote.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[27]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 73.6% 11,115 16.8% 2,535 9.6% 1,445
2012 76.9% 11,234 20.0% 2,927 3.1% 447
2008 72.3% 10,839 25.1% 3,757 2.6% 389
2004 76.7% 10,917 21.1% 3,007 2.2% 307
2000 77.0% 9,884 18.9% 2,424 4.1% 528
1996 61.4% 7,430 26.8% 3,240 11.8% 1,428
1992 46.6% 5,218 24.7% 2,771 28.7% 3,220
1988 71.0% 6,884 27.3% 2,646 1.8% 172
1984 79.2% 7,994 19.5% 1,965 1.4% 136
1980 73.0% 6,435 19.5% 1,718 7.5% 658
1976 68.3% 5,878 30.9% 2,656 0.8% 68
1972 74.8% 5,890 24.8% 1,950 0.4% 35
1968 65.6% 4,677 26.0% 1,852 8.5% 605
1964 49.7% 3,698 50.3% 3,745
1960 64.4% 4,510 35.6% 2,496
1956 69.2% 4,397 30.8% 1,960
1952 70.6% 5,067 29.1% 2,084 0.3% 24
1948 51.6% 2,655 47.8% 2,461 0.6% 29
1944 53.3% 2,571 46.8% 2,257
1940 47.6% 2,512 52.0% 2,747 0.4% 23
1936 37.5% 1,618 60.1% 2,594 2.4% 103
1932 42.6% 1,600 54.4% 2,043 3.0% 114
1928 66.7% 2,175 32.6% 1,062 0.7% 23
1924 55.5% 1,607 18.3% 530 26.2% 760
1920 70.5% 1,630 28.8% 666 0.7% 15
1916 46.9% 1,092 49.2% 1,146 3.9% 91
1912 29.8% 534 37.5% 672 32.7% 586

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data." US Census Bureau.
  4. ^ Long, John H., ed. (2004). "Wyoming: Individual County Chronologies". Wyoming Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  5. ^ a b History of Park County (accessed 11 January 2019)
  6. ^ Urbanek, Mae (1988). Wyoming Place Names. Missoula MT: Mountain Press Pub. Co. ISBN 0-87842-204-8.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 18, 2015.
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  9. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved August 18, 2015.
  10. ^ "Historical Decennial Census Population for Wyoming Counties, Cities, and Towns". Wyoming Department of Administration & Information, Division of Economic Analysis. Retrieved January 25, 2014.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  14. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  15. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  16. ^ Badger Basin Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  17. ^ Canyon Village WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  18. ^ Devils Den WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  19. ^ Dry Creek WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  20. ^ Dumbell WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  21. ^ Elk Basin WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  22. ^ Fossil Forest WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  23. ^ Kirwin WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  24. ^ Pahaska Tepee WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  25. ^ Tower Junction WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  26. ^ Willwood WY Google Maps (accessed 11 January 2019)
  27. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 5, 2018.

External linksEdit