Pakistan International Airlines Flight 404

Pakistan International Airlines Flight 404 was a Fokker F27 Friendship that disappeared shortly after takeoff on 25 August 1989. At 07:36, a domestic scheduled passenger flight of Pakistan International Airlines took off from the northern city of Gilgit, Pakistan on its way to the national capital Islamabad. One of the pilots of the aircraft made a routine radio call at 07:40; this was the last communication with the aircraft. The aircraft is thought to have crashed in the Himalayas, but the wreckage has never been found.[1]

Pakistan International Airlines Flight 404
PIA-F27-Lahore-30861.JPG
A PIA F27 similar to the accident aircraft
Incident
Date25 August 1989 (1989-08-25)
SummaryMissing
SiteHimalaya Mountains, Pakistan (presumed)
35°14′12.87″N 74°35′24.22″E / 35.2369083°N 74.5900611°E / 35.2369083; 74.5900611Coordinates: 35°14′12.87″N 74°35′24.22″E / 35.2369083°N 74.5900611°E / 35.2369083; 74.5900611
Aircraft
Aircraft typeFokker F27 Friendship
OperatorPakistan International Airlines
RegistrationAP-BBF
Flight originGilgit Airport (GIL/OPGT), Pakistan
DestinationIslamabad International Airport (ISB/OPRN), Pakistan
Occupants54
Passengers49
Crew5
Fatalities54 (Presumed)
Missing54
Survivors0 (Presumed)

AircraftEdit

The aircraft was a Fokker F27-200 Friendship turboprop airliner, c/n 10207, built in 1962. It had accumulated approximately 44,524 hours of flying time; and 41,524 cycles (the number of times the aircraft had been pressurized) at the time of the accident.[2]

Search operationEdit

After the disappearance, several aerial search missions were launched by the Pakistani military during the first three or four days. Later land search parties were organized, comprising civilian and armed forces personnel, to search the area around the 8,000-metre-high (26,000 ft) mountain Nanga Parbat.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mir, Shabbir (29 August 2016). "27 years on, flight PK-404 still a mystery". The Express Tribune. Archived from the original on 29 August 2016. Retrieved 21 January 2020.
  2. ^ "Accident Report". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 4 February 2014.