Paidi Jairaj

Paidi Jairaj (born 28 September 1909 – 11 August 2000) was an Indian film actor, director and producer known for his works primarily in Hindi, Marathi and Gujarati language films, and Telugu theatre.[2][3] He holds the record of having the longest career in Indian films.

Paidi Jairaj
P. Jairaj in Magroor (1950).jpg
Born(1909-09-28)28 September 1909
Died11 August 2000(2000-08-11) (aged 90)
Alma materNizam College
Years active1929–1995
Spouse(s)Savitri Paidi
AwardsDadasaheb Phalke Award

During the talkie period, from 1931 onwards, he started with Shikari in Urdu and English languages. Subsequently, he became one of the leading actors for about two decades, along with Shantaram, Ashok Kumar, Prithviraj Kapoor, Motilal etc. He starred in about 170 feature films in a variety of roles. He directed a few films such as Mohar, Mala (1943), Pratima, Rajghar and Saagar (1951), which he produced. In 1980, he was awarded with the Dadasaheb Phalke Award, the highest award for films in India, for his contributions to Indian cinema.[3][4]

Early lifeEdit

Jairaj was born in Sircilla of Hyderabad State (present-day Telangana) on 28 September 1909. A nephew of Sarojini Naidu, he had three brothers - Paidipati Sundararaja Naidu, Paidipati Deendayal Naidu (Artist) and Paidipati Jairaj was the youngest.[3]

CareerEdit

Jairaj developed an interest in theatre and films during his graduate studies at Nizam College, and left for Bombay in 1929.[5] He made his acting debut in 1929 with the silent film Star Kling Youth, and subsequently he acted in about eleven silent films including Triangle of Love, Mathru Bhoomi, All for Lover, Mahasagar Mothi, Flight into Death, My Hero etc.[2][3]

He played the characters of Amar Singh Rathore [1957], Prithviraj Chauhan [1959], and Maharana Pratap [1960] among notable films. He also essayed the roles of Shah Jahan [1947], Tipu Sultan [1959] and Haider Ali [1962]. His other portrayals have been in films such as Sassi Punnu [1947], Hatimtai [1956], Chandrashekar Azad [1963] and Durga Das [1964] among others. Jairaj did six films with Suraiya in the 1940s and 1950s, five of them, viz. Humaari Baat (1943), Singaar (1949), Amar Kahani (1949), Rajput (1951) and Resham (1952) as her hero, and one of them, Lal Kunwar (1952), as second lead. In 1952, he produced and directed his own film Sagar, which was not well received by the audiences, but he was still committed to cinema.[6]

Personal lifeEdit

He married a Punjabi woman, Savitri, from Delhi. It was an arranged marriage. Prithviraj Kapoor's father had chosen the bride for him.[7] He had two sons and four daughters. His wife died a year before him of cancer. His daughter Geeta looked after him in his last year. Rajan Shahi, TV producer-director, is his daughter's son (maternal grandson), the sole person of Jairaj's extended family in Bollywood.[2][8][9] Jairaj died in Mumbai on 11 August 2000.[2][3][5]

Popular cultureEdit

A one-hour documentary, Life journey of Jairaj, was made by the Government of Telangana in 2018 to celebrate his life.[10]

AwardsEdit

National Film Awards

FilmographyEdit

ActorEdit

DirectorEdit

  • 1945: Pratima
  • 1951: Saagar
  • 1959: Mohar

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Paithari, Raghu. "Sircilla-born Jairaj still remains unsung in film industry". Telangana Today. Retrieved 20 September 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d "rediff.com, Movies: Jairaj's son asked to vacate father's flat".
  3. ^ a b c d e Luminaries of 20th Century, Potti Sreeramulu Telugu University, Hyderabad, 2005
  4. ^ "::DIRECTORATE OF FILM FESTIVALS::". Archived from the original on 27 April 2014. Retrieved 28 April 2016.
  5. ^ a b "Paidi Jairaj 105 Jayanthi Utsavam".
  6. ^ Mahajan, Vidya. "Paidi Jairaj - The Invincible Celluloid Man".
  7. ^ "Jairaj – Profile".
  8. ^ Team, Tellychakkar. "Did you know that director Rajan Shahi and veteran film actor P.Jairaj are related?".
  9. ^ "How Rajan Shahi became a successful TV producer - TelevisionPost.com".
  10. ^ https://telanganatoday.com/documentary-on-telanganas-paidi-jairaj-to-be-released-on-july-28

External linksEdit