Paedagogi

In the Roman Republic, the paedagogus, plural paedagogi or paedagogiani,[1] was a slave or a freedman who taught the sons of Roman citizens[2] the Greek language.[3] In the period of the Roman Empire, the paedagogus became the director of the paedagogium.[3]

In the early Republic, there were no public schools, so boys were taught to read and write by their parents, or by educated slaves (paedagogi) usually of Greek origin.[4][5][6]

A representation of a paedagogus was painted as a graffiti on the walls of the Palatine Paedagogium, and it represents his social and cultural formation, which is identified such a slave.[1]

In an inscription of the second century dedicated to the Roman emperor Caracalla, it lists twenty-four paedagogi.[2] In some cases, the title of paedagogus is connected with private elite families.[7][8][9][10]

Being a paedagogus meant to obey conduct and duty laws.[2] In the imperial institution, the title of paedagogus refers to the duty of child-attendant or tutor rather than a teacher.[11] The other title of paedagogus refers to a variety of interrelated capacities related to the offspring of the imperial family and aristocracy: disciplina (academic and moral instruction), custodia (companion and protector) and decorum (directives of precepts for public behaviour).[12] There is a third title which appears in three inscriptions and means the director of the paedagogium (praeceptor).[13]

In other texts and graphics, slaves are divided depending on their membership of a larger servile environment (paedagogium), freedpersons (paedagogi, paedagogiani, custodes and procuratores) and a community of persons (pueri, iuvenes, vernae domini nostri).[14][clarification needed]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b George 2013, p. 70, "Reading the Pages of the Domus Caesaris: Pueri Delicati, Slave Education, and the Graffiti of the Palatine Paedagogium".
  2. ^ a b c George 2013, p. 73, "Reading the Pages of the Domus Caesaris: Pueri Delicati, Slave Education, and the Graffiti of the Palatine Paedagogium".
  3. ^ a b Lara Peinado, Federico; Cabrero Piquero, Javier; Cordente Vaquero, Félix; Pino Cano, Juan Antonio (2009). Diccionario de instituciones de la Antigüedad (in Spanish) (1ª ed.). Fuenlabrada (Madrid): Ediciones Cátedra (Grupo Anaya, Sociedad Anónima). p. 409. ISBN 9788437626123.
  4. ^ Lecture 13: A Brief Social History of the Roman Empire by Steven Kreis. Written 11 October 2006. Retrieved 2 April 2007.
  5. ^ Adkins, Lesley; Adkins, Roy (1998). Handbook to Life in Ancient Rome. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 211. ISBN 0-19-512332-8.
  6. ^ Werner, Paul (1978). Life in Rome in Ancient Times. Geneva: Editions Minerva S.A. p. 31.
  7. ^ CIL 6.8982-6. Dedication (October, AD 198)
  8. ^ CIL 6.1502
  9. ^ CIL 6.7290, 9740
  10. ^ cf. Dig. 33.7.12.32
  11. ^ Mohler 1940, p. 267-273.
  12. ^ Bradley 1991, p. 37-64.
  13. ^ Bradley 1991, p. 71-72.
  14. ^ George 2013, p. 93, "Reading the Pages of the Domus Caesaris: Pueri Delicati, Slave Education, and the Graffiti of the Palatine Paedagogium".

BibliographyEdit

External linksEdit