P. K. Sarangapani

T. K. Sarangapani (1925 – 2 February 2011) was a Malayalam screenwriter and playwright. He has written the screenplay and dialogues for thirty six films, most of them for Kunchacko's Udaya Studios. Most of his films are Vadakkanpattu-related period dramas.[1]

T.K. Sarangapani
PK Sarangapani.jpg
Born1925, July 28
Alappuzha, Kerala
Died(2011-02-02)2 February 2011
Cherthala, Alappuzha, Kerala
OccupationScreenwriter
Playwright
Years active1960–1990

BiographyEdit

Sarangapani was born on 1925 as the son of Arattuvazhi Anthekkuparambil Veettil Pappi and Kankali in Alappuzha district. After completing his education from Alappuzha, he worked in the South Indian Rubber Works. He joined the Communist Party of India (CPI) in mid-1940s and participated in the Punnapra-Vayalar uprising. He started his career as a writer through the Leftist stage movement and scripted some of the notable stage dramas of the 1950s and early 1960s.[citation needed]

He joined the Udaya Studios, founded by Kunchacko, in 1960 and scripted majority of their notable works during the 1960s and 1970s. His debut work Umma, based on a novel by Moidu Padiyath , was the first Muslim social film in Malayalam.[2] Some of his famous films include Vadakkanpattu related Palattu Koman, Othenante Makan, Aromal Chekavar, Unniyarcha, Palattu Kunjikannan, Thumbolarcha and Kadathanadan Ambadi, and social dramas Manishada and Thaara.[citation needed]

His last work was released in 1990. He volunteerly retired from film industry during this period. Sarangapani who was suffering from a prolonged illness died on 2 February 2011 at a private hospital in Cherthala.[3]

Selected worksEdit

FilmsEdit

PlaysEdit

  • Ballatha Duniyavu
  • Chilamboli
  • Bhavana
  • Avarente Makkal

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dennis Marcus Mathew (2 February 2011). "Malayalam cinema's Sarangapani is no more". The Hindu. Retrieved 3 February 2011.
  2. ^ B. Vijayakumar (7 March 2009). "Umma 1960". The Hindu. Retrieved 3 February 2011.
  3. ^ "Sarangapani dead". The Times of India. 2 February 2011. Retrieved 3 February 2011.
  4. ^ http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/kerala/2011/feb/04/farewell-master-scriptwriter-sarangapani-224591.html