Otto von Lutterberg

Otto von Lutterberg (died 16 February 1270) was the Landmeister of the Livonian Order of the Teutonic Knights from 1267 to 1270.[1]

Otto von Lutterberg
DiedFebruary 16, 1270
Baltic Sea near the island of Muhu
Cause of deathkilled at the Battle of Karuse

HistoryEdit

The Battle of Rakvere took place during his command of the Livonian Order, when on February 18, 1268 the combined forces of vassals of the Danish crown, Livonian Knights and local Estonian militia fought the combined forces of Novgorod and Pskov; the outcome of the battle is in dispute in the chronicles.[2] However, according to the Livonian Rhymed Chronicle Otto von Luttenberg was not present during the battle (being at that time in Semigallia) but in June of the following year led a Livonian retaliatory expedition to the lands of Pskov, where the forces under his command burned the castle of Izborsk, the town around Pskov castle and laid siege to the castle itself. The siege ended with a truce[3] after the defenders received reinforcements from Novgorod. Von Luttenberg then hastily traveled to Riga where he kidnapped and arrested the Archbishop of Riga Alfred Suerbeer, and thus solved the long-simmering power struggle with the Archbishop in favor of the Order, the bishop being released only after he promised not to appeal to the Pope or oppose the Order in the future.[4]

Otto von Luttenberg was killed in 1270 at the Battle of Karuse against the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. He is buried in Karuse village church, in present-day Estonia.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Anti Selart, Livonia, Rus’ and the Baltic Crusades in the Thirteenth Century, BRILL, 2015, ISBN 978-90-04-28475-3, pp. 313-314.
  2. ^ The Livonian rhymed chronicle. Smith, Jerry Christopher, 1941-, Urban, William L., 1939- (2nd ed., rev. and enl ed.). Chicago, IL: Lithuanian Research and Studies Center. 2001. pp. 77–78. ISBN 0929700341. OCLC 48921064.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: others (link)
  3. ^ The Livonian rhymed chronicle. Smith, Jerry Christopher, 1941-, Urban, William L., 1939- (2nd ed., rev. and enl ed.). Chicago, IL: Lithuanian Research and Studies Center. 2001. pp. 78–79. ISBN 0929700341. OCLC 48921064.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: others (link)
  4. ^ Christiansen, Eric (1997). The northern Crusades (2nd, new ed.). London, England: Penguin. pp. 123–124. ISBN 0140266534. OCLC 38197435.
  5. ^ Viirand, Tiiu (2004). Estonia. Cultural Tourism. Kunst Publishers. p. 106. ISBN 9949-407-18-4.