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Oregon Ballot Measure 91 (2014)

Results by county
  Yes
  No

Oregon Ballot Measure 91 was a 2014 ballot measure in the U.S. state of Oregon. Its passage legalized the "recreational use of marijuana, based on regulation and taxation to be determined by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission".[1]

Measure 91 was the third initiative seeking to legalize marijuana for recreational use in Oregon; previous measures were 1986's Measure 5 and 2012's Measure 80 while medical use of marijuana was legalized in Oregon in 1998. Measure 91 passed by approximately 56% to 44%.[2] Most polls leading up to the election showed majority support for legalizing recreational marijuana use among adults.[3][4][5][6]

Contents

ImplementationEdit

Effective July 1, 2015 (per Section 82(1)) the measure legalizes the possession and use of marijuana for adults 21-years of age or older. Adults can carry up to one ounce of marijuana, keep up to eight ounces at home per household, and grow up to four plants per household.[7]

Retail sales outlets will be licensed by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, which must begin accepting applications on or before January 4, 2016.[7] Early sales started October 1, 2015 through existing medical marijuana dispensaries.[8] Sales topped $11 million in the first week that recreational marijuana was legally available for sale in Oregon.[9]

Fiscal impactEdit

Estimates project that the initiative would generate between $17 million to $40 million per year in tax revenue. Potential cost savings for the state and local governments were noted though not explicitly identified in monetary terms due to uncertainty of the measure's full effects on marijuana-related convictions and fines.[10]

Opponents and proponentsEdit

OpponentsEdit

In September 2014 the Oregon District Attorneys Association and Oregon State Sheriffs Association launched an organized opposition, Vote No on 91.[11][12] Local opponents included The Oregon Pediatric Society, the Oregon chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Medal of Honor recipient Robert D. Maxwell, state representatives John Huffman and Gene Whisnant, state senator Tim Knopp, the Oregon Republican Party, and others.[13]

ProponentsEdit

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Yes No Undecided
SurveyUSA October 23–27, 2014 552 ± 4.3% 52% 41% 7%
Elway Research October 26–27, 2014 403 ± 5.0% 44% 46% 7%
SurveyUSA October 16–19, 2014 561 ± 4.2% 48% 37% 15%
DHM Research October 8–11, 2014 516 ± 4.3% 52% 41% 7%
SurveyUSA September 22–24, 2014 568 ± 4.2% 44% 40% 16%
SurveyUSA August 1–5, 2014 564 ± 4.2% 51% 42% 6%
SurveyUSA June 5–9, 2014 560 ± 4.2% 51% 41% 8%

ResultsEdit

Measure 91
Choice Votes %
  Yes 847,865 56.11
No 663,346 43.89
Total votes 1,511,211 100.00
Registered voters and turnout 2,178,334 69.37

Source: Oregon State Elections Division[23]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Wong, Peter (August 1, 2014). "Numbers assigned to state measures". Portland Tribune. Retrieved August 7, 2014.
  2. ^ "Measure 91: Oregon voters pass legalization of recreational marijuana". KPTV. 2014-11-04. Retrieved 2014-11-04.
  3. ^ Mapes, Jeff (May 8, 2014). "Gay marriage, marijuana legalization measures show strong support in new Oregon poll". The Oregonian. Retrieved August 11, 2014.
  4. ^ Elliott, Steve (June 13, 2014). "Oregon: New Poll Shows 51% Want To Legalize Marijuana In November". Hemp News. Retrieved August 11, 2014.
  5. ^ Ferner, Matt (July 22, 2014). "Oregon Will Vote On Legalizing Recreational Marijuana In 2014". The Huffington Post. Retrieved August 11, 2014.
  6. ^ Walker, Jon (October 15, 2014). "Oregon Marijuana Legalization Initiative Winning in Latest Poll". Firedoglake. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  7. ^ a b Gordon, Tim (October 28, 2014). "Decoding legal pot: Answering questions on Measure 91". KGW.com. Retrieved November 6, 2014.
  8. ^ "Pot's legal in Oregon: Scenes from the first day of sales". OregonLive.com. Retrieved 2016-03-02.
  9. ^ Mehlhaf, Nina. "Oregon's first week of recreational pot sales tops $11 million. This is greater by a very wide margin than the first-week sales totals of both Colorado and Washington combined". kgw.com. KGW. Archived from the original on May 23, 2016. Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  10. ^ Chokshi, Niraj (August 11, 2014). "Oregon expects up to $40 million in new revenue annually if voters legalize pot this fall". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 11, 2014.
  11. ^ a b Jaquiss, Nigel; Wilson, Kate (August 12, 2014). "Organized Opposition Mounts Against Recreational Weed Campaign". Willamette Week. Retrieved August 22, 2014.
  12. ^ Mapes, Jeff (September 29, 2014). "Marijuana legalization: Opponents open campaign attacking pot products attractive to children". The Oregonian. Retrieved November 5, 2014.
  13. ^ "Our Supporters". Vote No on 91. Archived from the original on 5 November 2014. Retrieved 5 November 2014.
  14. ^ Elliott, Steve (September 4, 2014). "Oregon: Measure 91 Wins More Major Endorsements For Marijuana Legalization". Hemp News. Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp. Retrieved September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ "Democratic Party of Oregon Chooses Positions on Statewide Ballot Initiatives". Democratic Party of Oregon. August 20, 2014. Retrieved August 22, 2014.
  16. ^ Altieri, Erik (August 20, 2014). "Democratic Party of Oregon Endorses Marijuana Legalization Initiative". National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). Retrieved August 22, 2014.
  17. ^ "Blumenauer, Marquis debate whether Oregon marijuana law is already sufficiently mellow". The Oregonian. September 12, 2014. Retrieved September 12, 2014.
  18. ^ "Exclusive Interview: Merkley First U.S. Senator To Back Legalizing Marijuana". Talking Points Memo. October 22, 2014. Retrieved October 23, 2014.
  19. ^ Mapes, Jeff (October 25, 2013). "With national backing, marijuana advocates file legalization measure". The Oregonian. Retrieved August 25, 2014.
  20. ^ "Anthony Johnson: 14 People Who Made a Difference in 2014". Go Local PDX. December 22, 2014. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  21. ^ "It's time to legalize recreational marijuana: Editorial endorsement". The Oregonian. August 23, 2014. Retrieved August 25, 2014.
  22. ^ "Legal, regulated marijuana: Yes". The Register-Guard. September 28, 2014. Retrieved September 29, 2014.
  23. ^ Elections Division (December 4, 2014). "November 4, 2014, General Election, Official Abstract of Votes - Measure 91" (PDF). Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved 2014-12-05.

External linksEdit