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Ordubad is a rayon of Azerbaijan in the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic. Ordubad district was established in 1930. In 1963, the district was abolished and given to the Julfa region. Since 1965, it has been an independent district. It borders on Iran in the south, Armenia in the north and west and Julfa region in the east and covers an area of 972 square kilometres (375 sq mi). There is 1 city, 3 settlements, and 43 villages within the district. The administrative centre of the district is the Ordubad city.[1]

Ordubad
Map of Azerbaijan showing Ordubad Rayon
Map of Azerbaijan showing Ordubad Rayon
Country Azerbaijan
Autonomous republicNakhchivan
Settlement3
Villages43
CapitalOrdubad
Area
 • Total970 km2 (370 sq mi)
Population
 • Total42,700
 • Density44/km2 (110/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+4 (AZT)
Postal code
AZ6900
Telephone code(+994) 36

Contents

EtymologyEdit

Ordubad is a name of Turco-Persian origin and means "city of army" (from Turkic ordu (army) and Persian bad (city)), which implies that the city was founded during the period of the Mongol or the ensuing Il-Khanid rule.[2]

HistoryEdit

Ordubad region was a part of the khanates of Erivan and Nakhchivan, which were dependencies of Qajar empire, with Ordubad forming the main town of the district of Aza-Jeran in the eastern part of the khanate of Nakhchivan.[2] After the Russo-Persian War and the Turkmanchay Treaty of 1828, the region was ceded to Imperial Russia, and became a part of Nakhchivan Uyezd of Erivan Governorate. Since 1921 Ordubad was a part of Nakhchivan Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, which in 1990 became the Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic within the Azerbaijan Republic.

AnnexationEdit

After the signing of the Treaty of Kars, in spite of the announcement of Nakhchivan region the Soviet Socialist Republic, Armenia tried to refuse this article of the Treaty of Kars with certain excuses and began to make territorial claims against Nakhchivan. With the decisions of the Transcaucasian Central Executive Committee in 1929–1931, part of the territory of Nakhchivan ASSR has illegally been given to Armenia. Thus, Qurdqulaq (Gurdgulag), Xaçik (Khachik), Horadiz (Horadis) villages of the Sharur District, Ağbinə (Aghbina), Ağxaç (Aghkhaj), Almalı (Almaly), İtqıran (Itkyran), Sultanbəy (Sultanbek) villages of the Shahbuz District, Mehri (Meghri), Buğakər (Bughakar), Aldərə (Aldara), Lehvaz, Astazur, Nüvədi (Nyuvadi) settlements which includes to the Qərcıvan (Gorchivan) administrative unit of Ordubad District, a part of the Kilit village, altogether, 657 square kilometers area were given to Armenia. In 1930, moreover, the Mehri district was established on the basis of separated land. In subsequent years, a number of areas also annexed to Armenia. In the 1990s, the Armenian armed forces have occupied the village of Karki. Thus, about 15 per cent of the determined territory of Nakhchivan Autonomous Republic by the Treaty of Kars, has illegally been occupied by Armenia in 20-90-es of the last century.[3]

PopulationEdit

According to the State Statistics Committee, as of 2018, the population of city recorded 49,700 persons, which increased by 8,500 persons (about 20.6 persent) from 41,200 persons in 2000.[4] 24,700 of total population are men, 25,000 are women.[5] More than 25,9 percent of the population (about 12,900 persons) consists of young people and teenagers aged 14-29.[6]

The population of the district by the year (at the beginning of the year, thousand persons)[4]
Region 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Ordubad region 41,2 41,7 42,1 42,5 42,8 43,3 43,6 43,9 44,5 45,0 45,5 46,1 46,9 47,7 48,4 48,8 49,2 49,5 49,7
urban population 9,9 10,0 10,0 10,0 10,2 10,2 10,3 10,3 10,4 10,4 10,5 10,6 10,7 10,9 11,0 11,0 11,1 11,2 11,2
rural population 31,3 31,7 32,1 32,5 32,6 33,1 33,3 33,6 34,1 34,6 35,0 35,5 36,2 36,8 37,4 37,8 38,1 38,3 38,5

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Naxçıvan Ensiklopediyası" - 2 cilddə, II cild, Naxçıvan, 2005. səh 207. Archived 2016-07-01 at the Wayback Machine ISBN 5-8066-1468-9
  2. ^ a b Bosworth, C. Edmund. "ORDUBĀD". Encyclopædia Iranica. Retrieved 24 Nov 2014.
  3. ^ ANAS, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences (2005). Nakhchivan Encyclopedia. volume I. Baku: ANAS. p. 218. ISBN 5-8066-1468-9.
  4. ^ a b "Political division, population size and structure: Population by towns and regions of the Republic of Azerbaijan". The State Statistical Committee of the Republic of Azerbaijan. Retrieved 2018-12-18.
  5. ^ "Political division, population size and structure: Population by sex, towns and regions, urban settlements of the Republic of Azerbaijan at the beginning of the 2018". The State Statistical Committee of the Republic of Azerbaijan. Retrieved 2018-12-18.
  6. ^ "Political division, population size and structure: Population at age 14-29 by towns and regions of the Republic of Azerbaijan at the beginning of the 2018". The State Statistical Committee of the Republic of Azerbaijan. Retrieved 2018-12-18.

External linksEdit

See alsoEdit