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Colin R. Turner is an Irish author and social activist. He is the founder of the Free World Charter, and author of two books based on proposals for a moneyless society. In 2013, Turner embarked on a round-the-world travel attempt without using money.[1][2][3][4]

Colin R. Turner
Colin R. Turner
Born Colin Richard Turner
(1968-07-10) 10 July 1968 (age 50)
Dublin, Ireland
Occupation Author, activist
Nationality Irish
Website
colinrturner.com

Contents

BiographyEdit

Turner has been a guest on RTV Marbella's Marbella Now TV and Mi Marbella programmes.[5][when?]

TheoriesEdit

The Free World CharterEdit

'The Free World Charter' consists of ten principles Turner believes will "optimise life on Earth for all species" and eliminate greed and poverty.[1]

Open sharing economyEdit

Turner proposes what he calls an 'open sharing economy', founded on the basic principles of sharing and shifting individual purpose from self-interest to group interest.[6]:25 He defines the open economy as: "the application of an open, distributed model to a traditionally closed-loop economic system. In other words, rather than every individual seeking only to benefit themselves, a common understanding exists that enables everyone to benefit everyone, including themselves."[6]:23

BibliographyEdit

F-Day: The Second Dawn of Man (2016)[7] is a Political drama in which the main character Karl Drayton initiates a hypothetical countdown to a moneyless society.[8]

Into The Open Economy (2016)[9] sets out proposals for an 'open free economy' without money, trade or governance.[10]

Turner goes on to detail the inherent limitations of trade and governance, where he claims trade and exclusive ownership always lead to wealth concentration,[6]:12 and the rise in technological unemployment must inevitably negate the market system through the collapse of the labour market.[11]

CriticismEdit

'The Free World Charter' has been covered by alternative media websites such as ShoutOutUK,[12] and Collective Evolution.[13][14] Mark Boyle (Moneyless Man) described Turner's work on the chapter to be "... of great importance".[1] The reviewer in ShoutOutUK thought that redistribution of wealth would be better than Turner's abolition of the monetary system.[15]

Freeworlder consider Turner's 'open sharing economy' to be similar to a Resource Based Economy such as that proposed by The Venus Project and The Zeitgeist Movement, but differs in that it proposes reaching a post-scarcity economy through acts of sharing, and not necessarily through technology.[16]

ReferencesEdit