Hong Kong Open (golf)

  (Redirected from Omega Hong Kong Open)

The Hong Kong Open is a golf tournament which is co-sanctioned by the Asian Tour and the European Tour. It was founded in 1959 and in 1962 was one of the five tournaments that made up the inaugural Far East Circuit, later known as the Asia Golf Circuit. It remained part of the circuit until 1996, before joining the Asian Tour, then known as the Omega Tour, in 1997. It became co-sanctioned by the European Tour in 2001, as part of the 2002 season.

Hong Kong Open
Tournament information
LocationNew Territories, Hong Kong
Established1959
Course(s)Hong Kong Golf Club
Par70
Length6,700 yards (6,100 m)
Tour(s)European Tour (since 2001)
Asian Tour (since 1997)
Asia Golf Circuit (1962–1996)
FormatStroke play
Prize fund$1,000,000
Month playedJanuary (in 2020)
Tournament record score
Aggregate258 Ian Poulter (2010)
To par−22 José María Olazábal (2002)
−22 Ian Poulter (2010)*
*These records only date back to 2001 when this tournament became a European Tour event.
Current champion
Australia Wade Ormsby
Hong Kong GC is located in China
Hong Kong GC
Hong Kong GC
Location in China
Hong Kong GC is located in Hong Kong
Hong Kong GC
Hong Kong GC
Location in Hong Kong

The Hong Kong Open was played in spring from its inception until 1994,[1] but since 1995 has usually been played towards the end of the year, in November or December, and as a result has often fallen into the following year's European Tour season.

Since taking its place on the European Tour the event has always been held at the Hong Kong Golf Club in Sheung Shui, New Territories. The Hong Kong Golf Association, Hong Kong PGA, and Chinese PGA receive a limited number of exemptions into the tournament for their members.

HistoryEdit

In 1958, Hong Kong Golf Club member Kim Hall wrote to Australian professional Eric Cremin to see if those players playing in the Philippine Open in 1959 would consider staying in the region to play in Hong Kong. Hall then approached Peter Plumley, secretary of South China Morning Post, who was also a golfer. Plumley then persuaded his boss to sponsor 1,000 Australian pounds in prize money in the name of South China Morning Post. Then, the first Hong Kong Open was launched in February 1959.[1] According to Hong Kong Golf Club member Willie Woo, Kim Hall was very keen for the tournament and he talked a lot with Australian golfers, including Peter Thompson. Woo helped to get Taiwanese players through his connections.[2]

The first tournament was hosted by Sir Robert Black, the then-Governor of Hong Kong. Around one thousand spectators joined the tournament.[3] Taiwanese golfer Lu Liang-huan won the inaugural edition of the tournament.[4] The success of the Hong Kong Open prompted first Singapore in 1961, and then Malaysia and Japan in 1962, to introduce their own tournaments and bring about the setting up of the Far East Golf Circuit.[4] The circuit further expanded into a regular ten-tournament tour, called the Asia Golf Circuit, that existed until the end of the twentieth century.

Despite the SCMP's original agreement to maintain 1,000 pounds sponsorship of the Hong Kong Open, it was felt that prize money would need to be increased if the best players were to be attracted. To that end the 1963 event was jointly sponsored by the SCMP and British American Tobacco, with the purse being increased to 4,000 pounds as a result.[4]

Due to poor weather conditions during the 1966 event, the Hong Kong Golf Club lost HK$10,442 as the money put up by the sponsors was insufficient to cover expenses. As a result, the club decided that in future it could not undertake to assist financially in any way, but would continued provide the courses and the general facilities.[4] The 1968 tournament was the first edition to be shown live on television.[4] In 1969, the newly formed the Hong Kong Golf Association took up the task of organising the tournament.[4] In 1971, the Hong Kong Open was on the verge of disappearing due to low spectator numbers and financial problems, but with the assistance of the Asia Pacific Golf Confederation, who were keen to retain the event on the Asia Golf Circuit, the tournament was saved.[5][6][7]

In 1996, Hong Kong golfer Dominique Boulet finished fourth, the best result by a local golfer.[8] In 2008, Florida-based Hong Kong amateur Hak Shun-yat became the youngest player ever to make the cut in a European Tour event, at 14 years and 304 days, eclipsing the record set by Sergio García at the Turespaña Open Mediterrania in 1995.[9] At the other end of the age spectrum, Miguel Ángel Jiménez became the oldest golfer ever to win on the European Tour when he won in 2012 at age 48 years, 315 days, and extended his record by defending his title in 2013 at age 49 years, 337 days.[10]

In 2013, organizers and potential sponsors raised concerns over the complex becoming enmeshed in a controversial redevelopment plan for Fan Ling.[11] The tournament was played that year without a title sponsor.

WinnersEdit

European Tour and Asian Tour event

Year* Winner Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up
Asian Euro
Hong Kong Open
2020 [a] Wade Ormsby (2)   Australia 263 −17 4 strokes   Shane Lowry
Honma Hong Kong Open presented by Amundi
2018 2019 Aaron Rai   England 263 −17 1 stroke   Matthew Fitzpatrick
UBS Hong Kong Open
2017 2018 Wade Ormsby   Australia 269 −11 1 stroke   Alexander Björk
  Rafael Cabrera-Bello
  Paul Peterson
  Julian Suri
2016 2017 Sam Brazel   Australia 267 −13 1 stroke   Rafael Cabrera-Bello
2015 2015 Justin Rose   England 263 −17 1 stroke   Lucas Bjerregaard
Hong Kong Open
2014 2014 Scott Hend   Australia 267 −13 Playoff[b]   Angelo Que
2013 2014 Miguel Ángel Jiménez (4)   Spain 268 −12 Playoff[c]   Stuart Manley
  Prom Meesawat
UBS Hong Kong Open
2012 2012 Miguel Ángel Jiménez (3)   Spain 265 −15 1 stroke   Fredrik Andersson Hed
2011 2011 Rory McIlroy   Northern Ireland 268 −12 2 strokes   Grégory Havret
2010 2010 Ian Poulter   England 258 −22 1 stroke   Simon Dyson
  Matteo Manassero
2009 2009 Grégory Bourdy   France 261 −19 2 strokes   Rory McIlroy
2008 2009 Lin Wen-tang   Taiwan 265 −15 Playoff[d]   Rory McIlroy
  Francesco Molinari
2007 2008 Miguel Ángel Jiménez (2)   Spain 265 −15 1 stroke   K. J. Choi
  Thongchai Jaidee
  Robert Karlsson
2006 2007 José Manuel Lara   Spain 265 −15 1 stroke   Juvic Pagunsan
2005 2006 Colin Montgomerie   Scotland 271 −9 1 stroke   K. J. Choi
  James Kingston
  Lin Keng-chi
  Edward Loar
  Thammanoon Sriroj
Omega Hong Kong Open
2004 2005 Miguel Ángel Jiménez   Spain 266 −14 1 stroke   Pádraig Harrington
  James Kingston
2003 2004 Pádraig Harrington   Ireland 269 −11 1 stroke   Hennie Otto
2002 2003 Fredrik Jacobson   Sweden 260 −16 2 strokes   Jorge Berendt
  Henrik Nyström
2001 2002 José María Olazábal   Spain 262 −22 1 stroke   Henrik Bjørnstad

* The first year listed is the one in which the tournament was played and the Asian Tour season which it belonged to. The second year listed is the European Tour season that it fell into.

Pre-European Tour co-sanctioning
Year Winner Score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up Ref
2000   Simon Dyson 263 −21 3 strokes   John Kernohan
  Charlie Wi
  Kim Felton
[13]
1999   Patrik Sjöland 269 –11 1 stroke   Ian Woosnam [14]
1998   Kang Wook-soon 272 −12 2 strokes   Ed Fryatt [15][16]
1997   Frank Nobilo 267 −17 5 strokes   Kang Wook-soon [17]
1996   Rodrigo Cuello 275 −5 3 strokes   Scott Hoch
  Bill Longmuir
[18]
1995   Gary Webb 271 −13 2 strokes   Rafael Alarcon [19]
1994   David Frost 274 −10 Playoff[e]   Craig McClellan [20]
1993   Brian Watts 274 −10 1 stroke   Chen Tze-chung [21]
1992   Tom Watson 274 −10 3 strokes   Ronan Rafferty [22][23][24][25]
1991   Bernhard Langer 269 −15 7 strokes   Choi Sang-ho
  Lu Wen-ter
[26]
1990   Ken Green 205[f] 4 strokes   Brian Watts
  Danny Mijovic
[27]
1989   Brian Claar 274 1 stroke   Mats Lanner
  Gary Rusnak
[28]
1988   Hsieh Chin-sheng 274 5 strokes   Steve Bowman [29]
1987   Ian Woosnam 275 4 strokes   David Feherty
  Sam Torrance
[30]
1986   Seiichi Kanai 285 1 stroke   Ian Baker-Finch [31]
1985   Mark Aebli 270 4 strokes   Chen Tze-ming [32]
1984   Bill Brask 268 7 strokes   Greg Norman [33]
1983   Greg Norman (2) 134[g] 3 strokes   Mark James [34]
1982   Kurt Cox 276 −4 Playoff[h]   Tom Sieckmann
  Terry Gale
[35]
1981   Chen Tze-ming 279 1 stroke   Graham Marsh [36]
1980   Kuo Chie-hsiung 274 2 strokes   Lu Liang-huan [37]
1979   Greg Norman 273 −7 3 strokes   Lu Hsi-chuen
  Chen Tze-ming
  Hsu Chi-san
[38]
1978   Hsieh Yung-yo 275 1 stroke   Kim Seung-hack [39]
1977   Hsieh Min-nan (4) 280 1 stroke   Teruo Sugihara [40]
1976   Ho Ming-chung 279 2 strokes   Hsu Sheng-san [41]
1975   Hsieh Yung-yo (3) 288 1 stroke   Stewart Ginn
  Gaylord Burrows
  Ted Ball
[42]
1974   Lu Liang-huan (2) 280 Playoff[i]   Graham Marsh [43]
1973   Frank Phillips (2) 278 1 stroke   Ben Arda [44]
1972   Walter Godfrey 272 2 strokes   Takashi Murakami [45]
1971   Orville Moody 266 2 strokes   Haruo Yasuda [46]
1970   Isao Katsumata 274 1 stroke   Haruo Yasuda [47]
1969   Teruo Sugihara 274 2 strokes   Maurice Bembridge [48]
1968   Randall Vines 271 1 stroke   Teruo Sugihara [49]
1967   Peter Thomson (3) 273 Playoff[j]   Brian Huggett [50]
1966   Frank Phillips 275 2 strokes   Hideyo Sugimoto [51]
1965   Peter Thomson (2) 278 1 stroke   Ross Newdick [52]
1964   Hsieh Yung-yo (2) 269 Playoff[k]   Alan Murray [53]
1963   Hsieh Yung-yo 272 3 strokes   Tomoo Ishii [54]
1962   Len Woodward 271 1 stroke   Frank Phillips
  Bill Dunk
  Alan Murray
[55]
1961   Kel Nagle 261 6 strokes   Peter Thomson [56]
1960   Peter Thomson 272 [57]
1959   Lu Liang-huan 281 1 stroke   Bruce Crampton
  Kel Nagle
[58]
Source: [59][60]
Notes
  1. ^ Due to postponement and rescheduling, the Hong Kong Open was not a European Tour event in January 2020.[12]
  2. ^ Hend won with a par on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff.
  3. ^ Jiménez won with a birdie on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff.
  4. ^ Lin won with a birdie on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff; Molinari was eliminated on the first extra hole after making a par to Lin and McIlroy's birdies.
  5. ^ Frost won on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff, after McClellan had holed his second shot from the fairway for an eagle 2 on the final hole of regulation play to force the playoff.
  6. ^ Third round cancelled as the course was unplayable due to rain.
  7. ^ Reduced to 2 rounds due to rain.
  8. ^ Cox won with a par on the fourth hole of a sudden-death playoff; Gale was eliminated after making bogey on the first hole of the playoff.
  9. ^ Lu won with a birdie on the third hole of a sudden-death playoff.
  10. ^ Thomson won on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff.
  11. ^ Hsieh won on the fourth hole of a sudden-death playoff.

ScorecardEdit

Hole Name Yards Metres Par
1 Trench 468 428 4
2 The Trap 149 136 3
3 Fearsome 551 504 5
4 Temptation 288 263 4
5 Table Top 192 176 3
6 The Pimple 447 409 4
7 The Narrows 380 347 4
8 Oasis 188 172 3
9 The Bend 493 451 4
10 Holland 367 336 4
11 The Paddy 466 426 4
12 Short Hole 144 132 3
13 The Long Hole 529 484 5
14 The Bungalow 395 361 4
15 The Burn 426 390 4
16 The Road Hole 411 376 4
17 The Graves 406 371 4
18 The Ultimate 410 375 4
Total 6710 6137 70

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "A different era – founding father of the Hong Kong Golf Open recalls the early days of city's oldest sporting event". South China Morning Post. 3 October 2015.
  2. ^ "The last Happy Valley golf survivor: Willie Woo goes down memory lane". South China Morning Post. 21 October 2015.
  3. ^ S.C.M Post Open Golf Competition – New Page in Sporting History of H.K., South China Morning Post, page 1 & 20, 2 February 1959
  4. ^ a b c d e f Robinson, S (1989), "Festina Lente – A History of the Royal Hong Kong Golf Club", p. 85–105
  5. ^ "HK quit decision won't hurt Asian golf circuit". The Straits Times. Singapore. 4 September 1971. p. 28. Retrieved 25 February 2020 – via National Library Board.
  6. ^ "Staging of 1972 HK golf 'remote'". New Nation. Singapore. 7 September 1971. p. 15. Retrieved 25 February 2020 – via National Library Board.
  7. ^ "HKGA decide to hold 1972 tourney". The Straits Times. Singapore. 24 September 1971. p. 30. Retrieved 25 February 2020 – via National Library Board.
  8. ^ Boulet thrills Open fans with final round flourish, South China Morning Post, 9 December 1996
  9. ^ "Hak breaks Sergio Garcia's record, makes Euro Tour cut at 14 years old". ESPN. 21 November 2008. Retrieved 21 November 2008.
  10. ^ "With This Win: Miguel Ángel Jiménez" (Press release). PGA European Tour. 8 December 2013. Retrieved 20 December 2013.
  11. ^ Chen, Bonnie (22 July 2013). "In a hole". The Standard. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013.
  12. ^ "Hong Kong Open rescheduled for January 2020". ESPN. 6 December 2019.
  13. ^ 戴臣香港高球賽奪冠, Ta Kung Pao, page B7, 18 December 2000
  14. ^ Suttering Sjoland helds off Woosnam in gripping finale, South China Morning Post, 29 November 1999
  15. ^ 韓好手姜旭淳奪標, Hong Kong Commercial Daily, 30 November 1998
  16. ^ Final round duel puts friendship to test, South China Morning Post, 29 November 1998
  17. ^ Nobilo steadies ship, then takes Open by storm, South China Morning Post, 8 December 1997
  18. ^ Cuello shrugs off all challengers in Open win, South China Morning Post, 9 December 1996
  19. ^ Win makes Webb rethink career, South China Morning Post, 20 November 1995
  20. ^ Frost solves putting riddle in Open play-off, South China Morning Post, 28 February 1994
  21. ^ Watts stays the course for thrilling Open win, South China Morning Post, 15 February 1993
  22. ^ "Public golf course plea by Open winner Watson". South China Morning Post. 9 March 1992.
  23. ^ "Nerve-jangling win for Watson". South China Morning Post. 9 March 1992.
  24. ^ "湯屈臣失準製造緊張 仍以三桿壓倒華費迪". Sing Tao Daily. 9 March 1992. p. 11.
  25. ^ "International Results". The Canberra Times. 9 March 1992. p. 22. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  26. ^ Langer tames Fanling, South China Morning Post, 11 February 1991
  27. ^ American Green wins golf Open, South China Morning Post, 26 February 1990
  28. ^ Claar clinches memorable win, South China Morning Post, page 32, 20 February 1989
  29. ^ Hsieh leads Taiwan change, South China Morning Post, page 22, 15 February 1988
  30. ^ Woosnam wins by four shots, South China Morning Post, page 1, 2 March 1987
  31. ^ King Kanai's charge clinches Open crown, South China Morning Post, page 29, 3 March 1986
  32. ^ Amiable Aebli walking tall, South China Morning Post, page 33, 4 March 1985
  33. ^ Brask bolts home by seven shots, South China Morning Post, pate 21, 27 February 1984
  34. ^ Bit-hitting Norman's conquest, South China Morning Post, page 1, 28 February 1983
  35. ^ Cox wins Fanling thriller, South China Morning Post, page 1, 1 March 1982
  36. ^ Taiwan again! Dark horse Chen keeps up the Open tradition, South China Morning Post, page 24, 2 March 1981
  37. ^ King Kuo's crown as he pips Mr Lu, South China Morning Post, page 21, 3 March 1980
  38. ^ Australian clinches HK title, South China Morning Post, page 11, 4 March 1979
  39. ^ Hsieh's fourth HK title, South China Morning Post, page 10, 5 March 1978
  40. ^ Hsieh wins HK Open, South China Morning Post, page 12, 6 March 1977
  41. ^ Taiwanese sweep HK Open Golf, South China Morning Post, page 10, 18 April 1976
  42. ^ Hsieh makes it three, South China Morning Post, page 1, 24 February 1975
  43. ^ Lu wins Open in dramatic play-off, South China Morning Post, page 19, 25 February 1974
  44. ^ Tremendous climax to a gripping Open, South China Morning Post, page 15, 6 March 1973
  45. ^ New Hongkong golf champion, South China Morning Post, page 1, 3 April 1972
  46. ^ Moody wins H.K. Open, South China Morning Post, page 1, 5 April 1971
  47. ^ Katsumata leads the charge, South China Morning Post, page 2, 30 March 1970
  48. ^ First Japanese ever to win at Fanling, Bembridge second, South China Morning Post, page 2, 31 March 1969
  49. ^ Randall Vines clings to title as dramatic Sugihara bid fools, South China Morning Post, page 2, 25 March 1968
  50. ^ Thomson wins golf title in play-off, South China Morning Post, page 1, 27 March 1967
  51. ^ Thrilling Duel Phillips Wins HK Open Despite Back Ailment, South China Morning Post, page 1, 28 March 1966
  52. ^ Thomson's Dramatic "Open" Win, South China Morning Post, page 1, 29 March 1965
  53. ^ Hsieh Retains Golf Title, South China Morning Post, page 1, 23 March 1964
  54. ^ Hsieh Yung-ho Wins H.K. Open, South China Morning Post, page 1, 11 March 1963
  55. ^ Woodward Wins H.K. Golf Open, South China Morning Post, page 1, 5 March 1962
  56. ^ Nagle Wins S.C.M. Post Open Golf tournament, South China Morning Post, page 1, 13 February 1961
  57. ^ Thomson Coasts to Victory in Open, South China Morning Post, 2 February 1960
  58. ^ "Crampton and Nagle Beaten". The Age. 3 February 1959. p. 20.
  59. ^ Robinson, Spencer (1989). Festina Lente – A History of the Royal Hong Kong Golf Club. Royal Hong Kong Golf Club. p. 105.
  60. ^ "Hong Kong Open: facts & figures, past champions and trivia". South China Morning Post. 21 November 2018. Retrieved 25 February 2020.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 22°29′31″N 114°06′54″E / 22.492°N 114.115°E / 22.492; 114.115