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Oleg Vladimirovich Blokhin, or Oleh Volodymyrovych Blokhin (Ukrainian: Оле́г Володи́мирович Блохі́н, Russian: Оле́г Влади́мирович Блохи́н; born 5 November 1952) is a former Ukrainian football player and manager. Blokhin was formerly a standout striker for Dynamo Kyiv and the Soviet Union.

Oleg Blokhin
Oleg Blokhin2013.jpg
Blokhin as manager of Dynamo Kyiv in 2014
Personal information
Full name Oleg Vladimirovich Blokhin, Oleh Volodymyrovych Blokhin
Date of birth (1952-11-05) 5 November 1952 (age 66)
Place of birth Kiev, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Forward
Youth career
1962–1969 Dynamo Kyiv
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1969–1988 Dynamo Kyiv 432 (211)
1988–1989 Vorwärts Steyr 41 (9)
1989–1990 Aris Limassol 22 (5)
Total 495 (225)
National team
1972–1988 Soviet Union 112 (42)
Teams managed
1990–1993 Olympiacos
1993–1994 PAOK
1994–1997 Ionikos
1998 PAOK
1998–1999 AEK Athens
1999–2002 Ionikos
2003–2007 Ukraine
2007–2008 Moscow
2011–2012 Ukraine
2012–2014 Dynamo Kyiv
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

He holds the all-time top goalscorer record for both Dynamo Kyiv (266 goals) and the Soviet Union national team (42 goals), as well as being the overall top goalscorer in the history of the Soviet Top League (211 goals). He is also the only player to have been capped over 100 times for the Soviet Union and holds Dynamo's appearance record with 582 appearances during his 18-year spell at the club. With Dynamo, Blokhin won eight Soviet league titles, five national cups and two European Cup Winners' Cups. He also competed for the Soviet Union at the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Games and 1982 and 1986 FIFA World Cups. During his playing career he won the Soviet Footballer of the Year award three times and the Ukrainian Footballer of the Year award nine times (both records). In 1975, he was named European Footballer of the Year, winning the Ballon d'Or, becoming the second Soviet and the first Ukrainian player to achieve such a feat.

As a coach, he has had two spells in charge of the Ukrainian national team, managing the team at the 2006 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2012.

In 2011, Blokhin, together with Igor Belanov and Vitaliy Starukhin were named as "the legends of Ukrainian football" at the Victory of Football awards.[1]

Contents

CareerEdit

Blokhin was born in Kiev, the capital of the Ukrainian SSR, in 1952 to a Russian father from Moscow and Ukrainian mother.[2]

PlayingEdit

Blokhin was one of the greatest forwards in the world throughout the 1970s, hitting the target regularly through a period of great success at his hometown club Dynamo Kyiv and becoming the greatest goalscorer in the history of the Soviet League, which was one of Europe's strongest. Normally a forward or winger, Blokhin was most renowned for possessing exceptional pace.

Blokhin played during most of his career for Dynamo Kyiv, becoming the USSR national championship's all-time leader and goalscorer with 211 goals, as well as making more appearances than any other player with 432 appearances. He won the championship 8 times. He led Dynamo to the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup in 1975 and 1986, scoring a goal in each final. Blokhin is also the USSR national football team's most capped player with 112 caps, as well as their all-time leading goalscorer with 42 goals; he played in the 1982 and 1986 FIFA World Cups where he scored 1 goal in each. He was one of the first Soviet players to play abroad, signing for Austria's Vorwärts Steyr in 1988, he also played in Cyprus with Aris.

In 1979 Blokhin played a couple of games for the Ukraine at the Spartakiad of the Peoples of the USSR.[3]

CoachingEdit

After retiring as a player, Blokhin coached Greek clubs Olympiacos (Under him they won the Greek Cup and the Greek Super Cup in 1992), PAOK, AEK Athens, and Ionikos.

He began serving as the head coach of the Ukrainian national team in September 2003. Under his leadership, Ukraine qualified for a major tournament for the first time as an independent nation, reaching the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany. Ukraine reached the quarter-finals of the tournament, losing to eventual champions Italy. Following the side's failure to reach UEFA Euro 2008, Blokhin stepped down as coach on 6 December 2007.[4]

On 14 December 2007, he was named head coach of FC Moscow.[5] The club finished 9th (from 16) and after the season ended Blokhin was fired from the club.[6] At the end of the season, Blokhin announced that if he knew how things would go in FC Moscow, he would have never signed there. This was because the club released many important players without Blokhin's permission yet still had many high expectations.[7] Others said that the reason Blokhin failed in FC Moscow was that he and the press didn't have a friendly relationship, and because of that the press was constantly attacking Blokhin and that damaged his status among the players.[8]

On 21 April 2011 Blokhin was again appointed head coach of the Ukrainian national team.[9][10] He led the team in UEFA Euro 2012 on home soil, beating Sweden but exiting at the group stage after defeats to France and England.

On 25 September 2012, Dynamo Kyiv signed Blokhin to lead the club for the next four years.[11] His final matches in charge of Ukraine were World Cup qualifiers against Moldova and Montenegro in October 2012.[12] Blokhin was dismissed as Dynamo's manager by the club's President Ihor Surkis on 17 April 2014 because of the "unsatisfactory results of the team".[11] The day before, in a press conference after Dynamo had lost a match against Shakhtar Donetsk, Blokhin had already stated that he had decided to resign.[11] Under his leadership Dynamo never qualified (a rare occasion for the club) for the UEFA Champions League and performed poorly in the UEFA Europa League.[11] In his first year his team finished third in the Ukrainian Premier League and in his second year (when he was fired) Dynamo was seven points behind Ukrainian Premier League leaders Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk and Shakhtar Donetsk.[11]

Career statisticsEdit

ClubEdit

Club Season League Cup Europe Super Cup Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Dynamo Kyiv 1969 1 0 - - - - - - 1 0
1970 - - 1 0 - - - - 1 0
1971 1 0 - - - - - - 1 0
1972 27 14 2 0 6 1 - - 35 15
1973 29 18 8 4 5 1 - - 42 23
1974 29 20 4 3 9 5 - - 42 28
1975 28 18 - - 8 5 - - 36 23
1976 19 8 1 0 8 2 - - 28 10
1977 29 17 3 2 2 0 1 0 35 19
1978 26 13 8 4 4 0 - - 38 17
1979 24 17 6 1 4 1 - - 34 19
1980 33 19 7 3 2 0 - - 42 22
1981 29 19 7 3 6 1 1 0 43 23
1982 24 10 3 0 4 0 - - 31 10
1983 31 10 1 0 2 0 - - 34 10
1984 30 10 6 2 - - - - 36 12
1985 29 12 2 1 9 5 - - 40 18
1986 23 2 5 5 8 5 1 0 37 12
1987 20 4 3 1 2 0 1 0 26 5
Total 432 211 67 29 79 26 4 0 582 266
SK Vorwärts Steyr 1987–88 13 5 - - - - - - 13 5
1988–89 28 4 1 1 - - - - 29 5
Total 41 9 1 1 - - - - 42 10
Aris Limassol 1989–90 22 5 6 2 - - - - 28 7
Total 22 5 6 2 - - - - 28 7
Career Total 495 225 74 32 79 26 4 0 652 283
  • The statistics in USSR Cups and Europe is made under the scheme "autumn-spring" and enlisted in a year of start of tournaments

InternationalEdit

[13]

Soviet Union
Year Apps Goals
1972 9 8
1973 10 1
1974 3 0
1975 7 2
1976 12 4
1977 10 4
1978 10 6
1979 5 1
1980 2 1
1981 6 5
1982 9 2
1983 9 5
1984 3 1
1985 4 0
1986 11 2
1987 1 0
1988 1 0
Total 112 42

International goalsEdit

Score and results list Soviet Union's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 1972-07-16 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki   Finland 1–0 1–1 Friendly
2. 1972-08-06 Råsunda Stadion, Stockholm   Sweden 4–3 4–4
3. 1972-09-01 Jahnstadion, Regensburg   Mexico 1–0 4–1 1972 Olympics
4. 2–0
5. 3–0
6. 1972-09-05 Rosenaustadion, Augsburg   Poland 1–0 1–2
7. 1972-09-08   Denmark 3–0 4–0
8. 1972-09-10 Olympic Stadium, Munich   East Germany 1–0 2–2
9. 1973-05-26 Central Lenin Stadium, Moscow   France 1–0 2–0 1972 World Cup qualifier
10. 1975-04-02 Kiev Central Stadium, Kiev   Turkey 3–0 3–0 Euro 1976 qualifier
11. 1975-05-18   Republic of Ireland 1–0 2–1
12. 1976-03-10 Všešportový areál, Košice   Czechoslovakia 1–0 2–2 Friendly
13. 1976-03-24 Vasil Levski National Stadium, Sofia   Bulgaria 3–0 3–0
14. 1976-05-22 Kyiv Central Stadium, Kyiv   Czechoslovakia 2–2 2–2 Euro 1976 qualifier
15. 1976-07-23 Lansdowne Park, Ottawa   North Korea 3–0 3–0 1976 Olympics
16. 1977-03-23 JNA Stadium, Belgrade   Yugoslavia 1–0 4–2 Friendly
17. 3–1
18. 1977-09-07 Central Stadium, Volgograd   Poland 3–1 4–1
19. 4–1
20. 1978-02-26 Stade El Harti, Marrakech   Morocco 1–1 3–2
21. 1978-04-05 Hrazdan Stadium, Yerevan   Finland 4–0 10–2
22. 6–0
23. 9–1
24. 1978-05-14 Stadionul 23 August, Bucharest   Romania 1–0 1–0
25. 1978-10-05 Ankara 19 Mayıs Stadium, Ankara   Turkey 2–0 2–0
26. 1979-03-28 Lokomotiv Stadium, Simferopol   Bulgaria 1–0 3–1
27. 1980-08-27 Népstadion, Budapest   Hungary 1–1 4–1
28. 1981-09-23 Central Lenin Stadium, Moscow   Turkey 3–0 4–0 1982 World Cup qualifier
29. 1981-10-07 İzmir Atatürk Stadium, Izmir 2–0 3–0
30. 3–0
31. 1981-11-18 Dinamo Stadium, Tbilisi   Wales 2–0 3–0
32. 1981-11-29 Tehelné pole, Bratislava   Czechoslovakia 1–0 1–1
33. 1982-06-03 Råsunda Stadion, Stockholm   Sweden 1–0 1–1 Friendly
34. 1982-06-19 Estadio La Rosaleda, Málaga   New Zealand 2–0 3–0 1982 World Cup
35. 1983-04-13 Stade Olympique de la Pontaise, Lausanne    Switzerland 1–0 1–0 Friendly
36. 1983-05-17 Praterstadion, Vienna   Austria 2–1 2–2
37. 1983-06-01 Helsinki Olympic Stadium, Helsinki   Finland 1–0 1–0 Euro 1984 qualifier
38. 1983-07-26 Zentralstadion, Leipzig   East Germany 1–0 3–1 Friendly
39. 1983-10-09 Central Lenin Stadium, Moscow   Poland 2–0 2–0 Euro 1984 qualifier
40. 1984-08-19 Kirov Stadium, Leningrad   Mexico 3–0 3–0 Friendly
41. 1986-06-09 Estadio Sergio León Chavez, Irapuato   Canada 1–0 2–0 1986 World Cup
42. 1986-10-29 Lokomotiv Stadium, Simferopol   Norway 3–0 3–0 Euro 1988 qualifier

Managerial statisticsEdit

As of 1 November 2015
Team Nat From To Record Achievement
G W D L Win %
Olympiacos   06/1990 01/1993 x x x x League runner-up 1991, 1992, Cup holder 1992
P.A.O.K.   1993 1994 x x x x
Ionikos   12/1994 02/1997 x x x x
P.A.O.K.   1998 1998 x x x x
AEK Athens   11/1998 05/1999 x x x x
Ionikos   03/2000 01/2002 x x x x
Ukraine   01/2003 12/2007 46 21 14 11 045.65 Won qual.group for 2006, Reached 2006 World Cup quarter-finals
Moscow   12/2007 11/2008 30 9 11 10 030.00
Ukraine   04/2011 2012 12 5 3 4 041.67 Eliminated at group stage of Euro 2012
Dynamo Kyiv   09/2012 03/2014 58 32 10 16 055.17

PoliticsEdit

In 1998 Blokhin was elected to Verkhovna Rada (Ukraine's parliament) for Hromada.[14] He joined Hromada while still being a member of the Communist Party of Ukraine.[14] In 2002, Blokhin was elected to Verkhovna Rada for a second term. In October 2002, he joined the United Social Democratic Party of Ukraine.

FamilyEdit

Blokhin's father, Vladimir Ivanovich Blokhin, is a native of Moscow, a veteran of the World War II, survivor of the Leningrad blockade, and a former Soviet law enforcement agent. Vladimir Blokhin later worked as a sports functionary for the Soviet Dynamo Society. Blokhin's mother Katerina Zakharivna (née Adamenko) is from a village in the Borodyanka Raion. She originally worked at a Kyiv sewing factory, but eventually discovered hidden athletic talents and became the Soviet champion in track and field as well as pentathlon. After retiring from sports, she became a staff member at one of Kyiv's universities.

Blokhin was married to Irina Deriugina, a top coach and former world champion in rhythmic gymnastics, but the couple divorced in the early 1990s. Blokhin and Deriugina have a daughter, singer Iryna Blokhina, who wrote and performed the Euro 2012 anthem.[15]

Blokhin and his second wife, Angela, have two daughters, Hanna (born 2001) and Katerina (born 2002).[16]

HonoursEdit

ClubEdit

Dynamo Kyiv

IndividualEdit

Ballon d'OrEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.bulvar.com.ua/arch/2011/51/4ef313ba6efb7/
  2. ^ Олег Блохин: «Москва» должна быть в тройке призёров//www.terrikon.dn.ua
  3. ^ Football at the 1979 Spartakiad of the Peoples of USSR
  4. ^ Soccer-Blokhin quits as Ukraine coach by Mikhail Volobuyev, Gennady Fyodorov and Ken Ferris, Reuters, 6 December 2007
  5. ^ FK Moscow hire former Ukraine manager Blokhin ESPNsoccernet 14 December 2007
  6. ^ Блохин освобожден от обязанностей главного тренера «Москвы». Sports.ru. 26 November 2008. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  7. ^ Олег Блохин: «Если бы знал, как будут делаться дела в команде, то весной бы не пришел в «Москву». Sports.ru. 16 November 2008. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  8. ^ Геннадий Литовченко: «Говорил Блохину, что его будут травить». Sports.ru. 4 December 2008. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  9. ^ Ukraine appoint Blokhin, Sky Sports (21 April 2011)
  10. ^ Oleg Blokhin appointed Ukraine coach, Reuters (21 April 2011)
  11. ^ a b c d e Dynamo president sacks Blokhin for poor performance, Interfax-Ukraine (17 April 2014)
  12. ^ Dynamo Kyiv signs Blokhin as coach for 4 years, Sports Illustrated (25 September 2012)
  13. ^ "Oleg Blokhin". National Football Teams. Benjamin Strack-Zimmerman. Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  14. ^ a b Oleh Blokhin: "I have scored all of my goals", Den (1998)
  15. ^ Донька Блохіна заспіває гімн "Євро-2012" (The daughter of Blokhin will sing the Euro 2012 anthem) with photo. TabloID. 11 November 2011
  16. ^ Yuri Yuris (27 September 2002). Олег Блохин: Место В Истории [Oleg Blokhin: Place in History]. Sport-Express (in Russian). Retrieved 25 February 2015.
  17. ^ Volodymyr Banyas (25 August 2015). "Best European footballers by season" (PDF). Ukrainian Football. Retrieved 2 June 2017. (ukr.)
  18. ^ "Legends". Golden Foot. Archived from the original on 25 September 2015. Retrieved 23 September 2015.
  19. ^ Cup Winners Cup Topscorers. Rsssf.com (18 December 2003). Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  20. ^ European Champions' Cup 1986–87 – Details. Rsssf.com (17 January 2008). Retrieved 2 January 2011.
  21. ^ [1] Archived 17 March 2005 at the Wayback Machine
  22. ^ "IFFHS announce the 48 football legend players". IFFHS. 25 January 2016. Retrieved 14 September 2016.

External linksEdit