Oh Yeah! Cartoons

Oh Yeah! Cartoons is an American animation showcase that appeared on the Nickelodeon cable network,[1] which was created and guided by Fred Seibert, former Creative Director of MTV Networks and President of Hanna-Barbera. Produced by Nickelodeon Animation Studio and Frederator Incorporated, it ran as part of Nickelodeon's Nicktoons lineup. In the show's first season, it was hosted by a variety of school kids, and the second season was hosted by Kenan Thompson of All That and Kenan & Kel, and later Josh Server of All That in the third and final season. Bill Burnett composed the show's theme music.

Oh Yeah! Cartoons
The Oh Yeah Cartoon Logo.png
Created byFred Seibert
Directed byJessica Thompson
Presented byVarious school kids (1998)
Kenan Thompson (1999–2000)
Josh Server (2000–2001)
Theme music composerBill Burnett
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes32 (96 segments) (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producersFred Seibert
Larry Huber
Producers
  • Bill Burnett
  • Ken Kessel (supervising producer)
Running time23 mins approx.
Production companiesFrederator Incorporated
Nickelodeon Animation Studio
Distributor
Release
Original networkNickelodeon (USA)
YTV (Canada)
Audio formatDolby Surround
Original releaseJuly 18, 1998 (1998-07-18) –
July 19, 2002 (2002-07-19)
Chronology
Followed byRandom! Cartoons
Related showsThe Fairly OddParents
ChalkZone
My Life as a Teenage Robot
External links
Website

In terms of sheer volume, Oh Yeah! Cartoons remains TV's biggest animation development program ever. Giving several dozen filmmakers the opportunity to create 96 seven-minute cartoons, the series eventually yielded three dedicated half-hour spin-off shows produced by Frederator: The Fairly OddParents, ChalkZone, and My Life as a Teenage Robot.[2]

Nickelodeon's Oh Yeah! featured in its first season a total of 39 brand new seven-minute cartoons, surpassing the number of new cartoons and characters on any other single network. In its full run, Oh Yeah! Cartoons featured and produced 96 cartoons.[3]

Many of the animated shorts were created by cartoonists who later became more prominent, including Bob Boyle, Thomas R. Fitzgerald, Bill Burnett, Jaime Diaz, Greg Emison, John Eng, John Fountain, Antoine Guilbaud, Butch Hartman, Larry Huber, Steve Marmel, Zac Moncrief, Ken Kessel, Alex Kirwan, Seth MacFarlane, Carlos Ramos, Rob Renzetti, C. Miles Thompson, Byron Vaughns, Pat Ventura, Vincent Waller, and Dave Wasson. Many of its animators featured had worked two years earlier on Cartoon Network's What a Cartoon!, produced in the same concept by Hanna-Barbera and Cartoon Network Studios, which was also created by Seibert while he was president of that historical studio.

LegacyEdit

Oh Yeah! Cartoons is the second Frederator short cartoon incubator. Frederator Studios has persisted in the tradition of surfacing new talent, characters, and series with several cartoon shorts "incubators," including (as of 2016): What A Cartoon! (Cartoon Network, 1995), The Meth Minute 39 (Channel Frederator, 2008),[4] Random! Cartoons (Nickelodeon/Nicktoons, 2008), Too Cool! Cartoons (Cartoon Hangover, 2012), and GO! Cartoons (Cartoon Hangover, 2016).[5] These laboratories have spun off notable series like: Dexter's Laboratory, The Powerpuff Girls, Chalk Zone, Johnny Bravo, Cow & Chicken, My Life as a Teenage Robot, Courage the Cowardly Dog, The Fairly OddParents, Nite Fite, Fanboy & Chum Chum, Adventure Time, Bravest Warriors, Rocket Dog, and Bee and PuppyCat.

FilmographyEdit

EpisodesEdit

Similar showsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "New Cartoons Are Draw On Some Old Animation Traditions" By Charles Solomon, Los Angeles Times, July 17, 1998
  2. ^ Perlmutter, David (2018). The Encyclopedia of American Animated Television Shows. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 436. ISBN 978-1538103739.
  3. ^ "Frederator Studios, TV Series, "Oh Yeah! Cartoons"
  4. ^ The Meth Minute 39 on YouTube
  5. ^ Sony, Channel Frederator Launch Online Animation Incubator, by David Bloom, Deadline Hollywood, November 3, 2014

External linksEdit