Oceania Area Championships in Athletics

  (Redirected from Oceanian Athletics Championships)

The Oceania Athletics Championships is an athletics event organized by the Oceania Athletics Association (OAA) for the World Athletics (WA) (formerly the IAAF) member associations of the Oceania region.[1] First held in 1990 in Suva, it was initially conceived as a quadrennial event however after the second edition in 1994, the championships changed to a biennial event. After the 2010 championships there were significant changes in the format of the competition. Now being held as a regional championships (in 2011 and 2012), the associations were divided into two divisions based on there geographical location either east or west. However, the competition was revised back to its original format as an area championships in 2013.[2][3]

Oceania Athletics Championships
Statusactive
Genresports event
Frequencybiennial
Location(s)various
Inaugurated1990
Most recent2019
Next event2023
Organised byOceania Athletics Association
Websiteathletics-oceania.com

The event has been held jointly with the Under-20 championships since 1994 and Under-18 championships since 2000. For the first time in 2014, para-athletics events were included in the championships.

Since the inaugural championships in 1990 (up until 2017), unlike the rest of the OAA member federations, only Australia and New Zealand send their second tier teams to compete in the championships. This was to allow pacific island nations to be competitive and challenge for medals.[4] However, in 2019, the championships became a fully tier-one competition when the then IAAF (now World Athletics), made a change in the qualification system for the 2019 World Championships in Doha as well as the 2020 Summer Olympics set for Tokyo. The rule change saw athletes would only qualify for either competition through their World Athletics ranking points. This meant that continental championships were now offering more points under the WA world rankings system.[5][6]

EditionsEdit

The 2021 edition set for Korman Stadium in Port Vila was cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, making this the first cancellation of the event.[7]

Edition Year Host City Host Country Date Venue Events Nations Athletes Champions
1 1990 Suva   Fiji 11-14 July National Stadium 39   New Zealand
2 1994 Auckland   New Zealand 22-26 February 38   New Zealand
3 1996 Townsville   Australia 28-30 November 42   New Zealand
4 1998 Nuku'alofa   Tonga 27-28 August Teufaiva Stadium 39   New Zealand
5 2000 Adelaide   Australia 24-26 August Santos Stadium 40   New Zealand
6 2002 Christchurch   New Zealand 12-14 December Queen Elizabeth II Park 40   New Zealand
7 2004 Townsville   Australia 16-18 December Townsville Sports Reserve 38   New Zealand
8 2006 Apia   Samoa 12-16 December Apia Park 37   New Zealand
9 2008 Saipan   Northern Mariana Islands 25-28 June Oleai Sports Complex 39   Papua New Guinea
10 2010 Cairns   Australia 23-25 September Barlow Park 36   Australia
11 2013 Papeete   French Polynesia 3-5 June Stade Pater Te Hono Nui 44   New Zealand
12 2014 Rarotonga   Cook Islands 24–26 June BCI Stadium 40   Australia
13 2015 Cairns   Australia 8–10 May Barlow Park 60   Australia
14 2017 Suva   Fiji 28 June–1 July ANZ National Stadium 57   New Zealand
15 2019 Townsville   Australia 25–28 June Townsville Sports Reserve 59   Australia
2021 Port Vila   Vanuatu Korman Stadium Cancelled due to COVID-19 pandemic
16 2023 TBA

All-time medal tableEdit

The all-time Oceania Athletics Championships medal table is the sum of all medals won by OAA member federations, associate members, as well as invited teams from the very first edition till the most recent championships in 2019. All medals counted are based on the official results posted on the Oceania Athletics Association website. Medals won by Para-athletes are also included.

Associate members with medals are listed in italic.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  New Zealand19011790397
2  Australia153167130450
3  Papua New Guinea888474246
4  Fiji745955188
5  Samoa34182173
6  Tonga23334096
 /  Regional Australia*[2]18181248
7  New Caledonia[1]16211956
8  French Polynesia15222259
9  Solomon Islands10101131
10  Vanuatu7141435
11  Cook Islands5121128
12  Guam5101732
13  Norfolk Island5229
14  Wallis and Futuna[1]2114
15  Kiribati16411
16  American Samoa13812
  Tahiti West Coast*[3]1034
17  Northern Mariana Islands0336
  Australian Masters team*[4]0202
18  Palau0112
19  Nauru0033
20  Marshall Islands0011
  Micronesia0011
Totals (21 nations)6486035431794
  • ^[1] Associate members of OAA - Not recognized by World Athletics.
  • ^[2] Regional Australia is a team from Northern Australia competing as invitees at every championships since 2013.
  • ^[3] Tahiti West Coast competed once back in 2013 as a local team from the host federation of French Polynesia.
  • ^[4] Australia Masters team competed once back in 2015 as an invited team from the host federation of Australia.

As of 2019, only Tuvalu (OAA member federation) and Niue (OAA associate member) have yet to win a medal.

Championship recordsEdit

Regional ChampionshipsEdit

Oceania Athletics has three regions. Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. Since 2000, each region, in a non area championships year hold their own regional championships. The regions at the regional meetings decide the location for the Championships.[8][9][10][11][12]

Melanesian ChampionshipsEdit

  Australia,   Fiji,   New Caledonia,   Norfolk Island,   Papua New Guinea,   Solomon Islands, and   Vanuatu competed for the Melanesian Championships.

Year City Country Date Venue No. of
Events
No. of
Athletes
1 2001 Suva   Fiji April
2 2003 Lae   Papua New Guinea 25–27 April
3 2005 Lae   Papua New Guinea 22–24 April Sir Ignatius Kilage Stadium
4 2007 Cairns   Australia 14–19 August Barlow Park
5 2009 Gold Coast   Australia 4–8 August Griffith University
6 2016 Suva   Fiji 7–9 July ANZ Stadium
7 2018 Port Vila   Vanuatu 9–11 May Korman Stadium

Micronesian ChampionshipsEdit

  Guam,   Kiribati,   Marshall Islands,   Federated States of Micronesia,   Nauru,   Northern Mariana Islands, and   Palau competed for the Micronesian Championships.

Year City Country Date Venue No. of
Events
No. of
Athletes
1 2003 Koror   Palau 25–26 April
2 2005 Saipan   Northern Mariana Islands 14–15 December Oleai Sports Complex
3 2007 Yona   Guam 14–15 December Leo Palace Resort
4 2009 Gold Coast   Australia 4–8 August Griffith University
5 2016 Kolonia   Federated States of Micronesia 2–4 June
6 2018 Saipan   Northern Mariana Islands 14–16 June Oleai Sports Complex

Polynesian ChampionshipsEdit

  American Samoa,   Cook Islands,   French Polynesia,   New Zealand,   Niue,   Samoa,   Tonga, and   Tuvalu competed for the Polynesian Championships.

Year City Country Date Venue No. of
Events
No. of
Athletes
1 2000 Apia   Samoa
2 2005 Papeete   French Polynesia October
3 2007 Rarotonga   Cook Islands October 16-17
4 2009 Gold Coast   Australia August 4-8 Griffith University
5 2016 Papeete   French Polynesia April 7 - 9 Pater Stadium

Oceania CupEdit

In addition, there was a short-lived Oceania Cup, where teams from Australia, New Zealand, and the respective host country competed with combined teams from Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia.[9][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20] The Australian team recruited from the winner team of the Australian Clubs Championships, which was, in both years, the University of Queensland Athletic Club.[21][17]

Year City Country Date Venue No. of
Events
No. of
Athletes
1 2001 Port Vila   Vanuatu July 14
2 2003 Apia   Samoa June 26-27 Apia Park

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Oceania Athletics Area Championships". Oceania Athletics. Retrieved 20 August 2021.
  2. ^ Oceania Regional Championships is only 115 days away!!, OAA, February 25, 2011, retrieved March 8, 2013
  3. ^ Oceania Regional Championships Handbook - includes official program and athletes/federations competing. Updated 14 June 2011 (PDF), OAA, June 14, 2011, p. 23, retrieved March 8, 2013[permanent dead link]
  4. ^ Australian Team for Oceania Championships Announced, Armidale Athletic Club, 26 October 2004, archived from the original on 22 February 2014, retrieved 14 February 2014
  5. ^ "PRESS RELEASE: ENTRIES OAC 2019". OAA. 9 May 2019. Retrieved 21 August 2021.
  6. ^ "Australia and New Zealand to field strong teams at invigorated Oceania Athletics Championships". Inside the Games. 24 June 2019. Retrieved 21 August 2021.
  7. ^ "OCEANIA ATHLETICS CHAMPIONSHIPS 2021". OAA. 16 February 2021. Retrieved 21 August 2021.
  8. ^ "REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS". Oceania Athletics. Retrieved 22 August 2021.
  9. ^ a b Oceania Cup / Regional Championships, OAA, retrieved March 11, 2013
  10. ^ MELANESIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS, Athletics Weekly, retrieved March 11, 2013
  11. ^ MICRONESIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS, Athletics Weekly, retrieved March 11, 2013
  12. ^ POLYNESIAN CHAMPIONSHIPS, Athletics Weekly, retrieved March 11, 2013
  13. ^ Snow, Bob, PNG in International Competition: 2001 - 2005, Papua New Guinea Athletics Union, retrieved February 14, 2014
  14. ^ Micronesian Team for Oceania Cup Final, OAA, 28 May 2003, retrieved February 14, 2014
  15. ^ Peter Pulu Heads Melanesian Team, OAA, 6 June 2003, archived from the original on 2014-02-22, retrieved February 14, 2014
  16. ^ Kiwis Ready for Oceania Cup Final, OAA, 9 June 2003, archived from the original on 2014-02-22, retrieved February 14, 2014
  17. ^ a b Matt Back for Second Oceania Cup Final, OAA, 23 June 2003, retrieved February 14, 2014
  18. ^ The 2003 Oceania Cup Final Competition was previewed at a special media launch in Apia, Samoa, last night., OAA, 25 June 2003, retrieved February 14, 2014
  19. ^ Oceania Cup Final - Results Days 1 and 2, OAA, 26 June 2003, retrieved February 14, 2014
  20. ^ Snow, Bob (7 July 2003), National Records Galore at Oceania Cup, OAA, retrieved February 14, 2014
  21. ^ ATHLETICS AUSTRALIA - 2001 Australian Clubs Championships, CoolRunning Australia, 17 January 2001, retrieved February 14, 2014

External linksEdit