November 1936

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The following events occurred in November 1936:

November 1, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

November 2, 1936 (Monday)Edit

November 3, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

November 4, 1936 (Wednesday)Edit

November 5, 1936 (Thursday)Edit

November 6, 1936 (Friday)Edit

November 7, 1936 (Saturday)Edit

  • The Madrid Defense Council was formed.
  • Father Charles Coughlin announced that he was withdrawing from "all radio activity in the best interest of all the people" and retiring from politics.[15] This retirement proved to be short-lived as he returned to the air in January 1937.[16]
  • Died: Charles "Chic" Sale, 51, American actor and vaudevillian

November 8, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

November 9, 1936 (Monday)Edit

November 10, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

November 11, 1936 (Wednesday)Edit

  • The Peel Commission arrived in Palestine to investigate the causes of the recent Arab unrest and recommend solutions.[2]
  • Joseph Goebbels banned art criticism in Germany and declared that only "art reporting" would be allowed from now on.[22]
  • President Roosevelt sent birthday greetings to Victor Emmanuel III of Italy, but only addressed him as the "king of Italy" and avoided his new additional title of "emperor of Ethiopia".[23]

November 12, 1936 (Thursday)Edit

  • Winston Churchill gave a speech in Parliament attacking the Baldwin government for its slow response to the "unwelcome fact" of German rearmament, warning that Britain was entering a new period of danger. "The era of procrastination, of half measures, of soothing and baffling expedients, of delays, is coming to a close", Churchill stated. "In its place, we are entering a period of consequences."[24]
  • The San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge opened.
  • The comedy play Housemaster by Ian Hay premiered at the Apollo Theatre in London.

November 13, 1936 (Friday)Edit

November 14, 1936 (Saturday)Edit

November 15, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

November 16, 1936 (Monday)Edit

November 17, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

  • In British Parliament, Labour MP William Adamson asked President of the Board of Trade Walter Runciman if there was "any special scrutiny of books and printed literature imported from other countries." Runciman, pretending to be unaware that this was in reference to the censorship of foreign newspapers and magazines reporting on the king's relationship with Wallis Simpson, asked Adamson to provide particulars to his office in order to get an answer. Ellen Wilkinson, also of Labour, then asked Runciman "why, in the case of two American magazines of high repute imported into this country during the last few weeks, at least two and sometimes three pages have been torn out; and what is this thing the British public are not allowed to see?" "My department has nothing to do with that", Runciman answered.[32][33]
  • Died: John Bowers, 50, American film actor (suicide)

November 18, 1936 (Wednesday)Edit

November 19, 1936 (Thursday)Edit

November 20, 1936 (Friday)Edit

November 21, 1936 (Saturday)Edit

November 22, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

  • Submarines attacked the Spanish Republican fleet at Cartagena. The Spanish Republic issued a statement expressing its belief that the submarines were "part of a foreign fleet, since the rebels have never possessed such instruments."[39]
  • Died: Ernest R. Graham, 68, American architect

November 23, 1936 (Monday)Edit

November 24, 1936 (Tuesday)Edit

  • Nazi Germany attacked the Nobel Prize committee for its decision to award the Peace Prize to Carl von Ossietzky. "Bestowing the Nobel Prize on a notorious traitor is an impudent challenge and insult to the new Germany", the statement read.[43]
  • Following the German and Italian recognition of Francoist Spain, the Republic seized their embassies in Madrid.[13]
  • A train accident on the Chicago "L" killed 10 people.[44]

November 25, 1936 (Wednesday)Edit

  • Japan and Nazi Germany signed the Anti-Comintern Pact.[4]
  • Edward VIII met with Stanley Baldwin again and said he wanted a morganatic marriage that would allow him to remain King while Wallis Simpson would be designated his consort instead of Queen. This arrangement would require new legislation and though Baldwin said this would not be acceptable, he would take the matter up with the Cabinet.[30]
  • The drama film Lloyd's of London had its world premiere at the Astor Theatre in New York City.[45]
  • Died: Andrew Harper, 92, Scottish-American biblical scholar

November 26, 1936 (Thursday)Edit

  • Albania recognized Francoist Spain.[46]
  • The Daily Mirror became the first British newspaper to put Wallis Simpson on its front page. The story, which only identified her as "a former United States society woman now living in London", was about the death threats she was receiving and the precautions detectives were taking of opening all packages she received.[47]

November 27, 1936 (Friday)Edit

November 28, 1936 (Saturday)Edit

November 29, 1936 (Sunday)Edit

November 30, 1936 (Monday)Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tucker, Spencer C. (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict: From the Ancient World to the Modern Middle East. ABC-CLIO, LLC. p. 1868. ISBN 978-1-85109-672-5.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "1936". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on June 10, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  3. ^ "1936 Presidential Election". 270ToWin. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  4. ^ a b "Chronology 1936". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  5. ^ "Austrian Cabinet Reorganized; Three Fascists Are Ousted". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 4, 1936. p. 20.
  6. ^ "The King's Speech". Hansard. November 3, 1936. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  7. ^ Kantowicz, Edward R. (1999). The Rage of Nations: The World in the Twentieth Century, Volume 1. Cambridge: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing. p. 342. ISBN 978-0-8028-4455-2.
  8. ^ Wiseman, Richard (2011). Paranormality: Why we see what isn't there. Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-230-75890-2.
  9. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (November 6, 1936). "Slanderers Hit by New Nazi Code of Laws". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  10. ^ Taylor, Edmond (November 8, 1936). "War Goes On, Cabinet Cries from Valencia". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  11. ^ a b c Simkin, John (2014). "Spanish Civil War: Chronology". Spartacus Educational. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  12. ^ Buckley, Henry (November 8, 1936). "Madrid Makes Last Stand". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  13. ^ a b c d e Cortada, James W., ed. (1982). Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 504. ISBN 0-313-22054-9.
  14. ^ "Mongoose That Talks Hebrew and Russian!". The Sunday Mail. Brisbane. November 8, 1936. p. 5.
  15. ^ "Coughlin Quits Air and Retires from Politics". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 8, 1936. p. 1.
  16. ^ "Father Coughlin's Concluding Saturday Night Radio Broadcast". The Catholic University of America. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  17. ^ Darrah, David (November 9, 1936). "250,000 Join Protest Over British Dole". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  18. ^ "Old Scot Sword Stolen; Seen as Sign of Revolt". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 10, 1936. p. 3.
  19. ^ "J. Barrymore and Elaine are Wed in Yuma". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 9, 1936. p. 1.
  20. ^ "The Coronation (Procession, Seats)". Hansard. November 10, 1936. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  21. ^ "Laborite Hints at King's Friendship for Wally; Squelched". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 11, 1936. p. 1.
  22. ^ Zalampas, Sherree Owens (1990). Adolf Hitler: A Psychological Interpretation of His Views on Architecture, Art and Music. Bowling Green State University Popular Press. p. 69. ISBN 978-0-87972-488-7.
  23. ^ "Roosevelt Greets Italy's King; Spurns Title of 'Emperor'". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 12, 1936. p. 2.
  24. ^ "Debate on the Address". Hansard. November 12, 1936. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  25. ^ Taylor, Edmond (November 14, 1936). "Deputies Riot in Paris Over Cry of Traitor". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  26. ^ "Belgium Calls League Hand on Sanctions Plan". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 14, 1936. p. 9.
  27. ^ "Calendar of Current Releases". Variety. November 18, 1936. p. 31.
  28. ^ "Reich Seizes Rule Of Treaty Rivers". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. November 14, 1936. p. 1.
  29. ^ "Peace Treaty of Versailles Articles 321-386". World War I Document Archive. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  30. ^ a b c "Edward VIII: abdication timeline". BBC News. January 29, 2003. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  31. ^ a b c d e Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. pp. 474–475. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  32. ^ "Imported Books and Printed Literature (Scrutiny)". Hansard. November 17, 1936. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  33. ^ Brewer, Sam (November 18, 1936). "King and Wally Cause Questions in British House". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 7.
  34. ^ Brewer, Sam (November 19, 1936). "Rebels Block Foreign Arms". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  35. ^ Robbins, Keith (2013). The Eclipse of a Great Power: Modern Britain 1870–1992. Routledge. p. 225. ISBN 978-1-317-89498-8.
  36. ^ "Military Draft Looms, Britain's Men are Warned". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 20, 1936. p. 3.
  37. ^ "Tageseinträge für 20. November 1936". chroniknet. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  38. ^ "Gen. O'Duffy and 40 Irish Fascists Leave for Spain". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 21, 1936. p. 2.
  39. ^ "Submarine War Hits Spain". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 23, 1936. p. 1.
  40. ^ "U.S. Orders Staf to Close Madrid Embassy; Seek Safety". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 24, 1936. p. 2.
  41. ^ "Blues legend Robert Johnson makes first-ever recording". History. A&E Networks. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  42. ^ "Robert Johnson". Rolling Stone. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  43. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (November 25, 1936). "Award Peace Prize to German; Nazis Angered". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13.
  44. ^ "The Granville Rear-End Accident". Chicago-L.org. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  45. ^ Holston, Kim R. (2013). Movie Roadshows: A History and Filmography of Reserved-Seat Limited Showings, 1911–1973. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 84. ISBN 978-0-7864-6062-5.
  46. ^ "Spanish Fascist Junta Recognized by Albania". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 27, 1936. p. 2.
  47. ^ "King's Friend Front Page News in London Paper for First Time". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 27, 1936. p. 2.
  48. ^ "The Covenant of the League of Nations". The Avalon Project. Yale Law School. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  49. ^ "Spain Throws Civil War into Lap of League". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 28, 1936. p. 1.
  50. ^ Trohan, Walter (November 28, 1936). "Roosevelt Hits Warmakers in Plea to Latins". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  51. ^ Payne, Stanley G. (1987). The Franco Regime, 1936–1975. University of Wisconsin Press. p. 154. ISBN 978-0-299-11070-3.
  52. ^ "29 Ecuadorians slain in Revolt; Many Arrested". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 30, 1936. p. 3.
  53. ^ Chen, Victor (2005). Lines in the Dirt. Xlibris. p. 240. ISBN 978-1-4628-2337-6.[self-published source]
  54. ^ Rothman, Jonathan (August 14, 2013). "New Yorker Profiles of Business Icons: The Past Eighty Years". The New Yorker. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  55. ^ "Navy Conquers Army, 7-0, Before 102,000". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 29, 1936. p. Part 2 p. 1.
  56. ^ Trohan, Walter (December 1, 1936). "Latins Cheer the President". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.