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North Goa district

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North Goa is one of the two districts that make up the state of Goa, India. The district has an area of 1736 km², and is bounded by Sindhudurg district of Maharashtra state to the north and by Belgaum district of Karnataka to the east, by South Goa District to the south, and by the Arabian Sea to the west.

North Goa district

उत्तर गोंय
उत्तर गोवा
Location of North Goa district in Goa
Location of North Goa district in Goa
CountryIndia
StateGoa
Administrative divisionN/A
HeadquartersPanaji
Tehsils1.Illhas de Goa,
2.Bardez,
3.Pernem,
4.Bicholim,
5.Sattari,
6.Ponda
Government
 • District collectorLevinson Martins (Goa Civil Service)[1][2]
 • Lok Sabha constituenciesNorth Goa
Area
 • Total1,736 km2 (670 sq mi)
Population
(2011)
 • Total817,761
 • Density470/km2 (1,200/sq mi)
 • Urban
60.28% [3]
Demographics
 • Literacy89.57
 • Sex ratio963
Major highways1.National Highway 17,
2.National Highway 4A
Average annual precipitation320 cm (June to September) mm
WebsiteOfficial website

Contents

Historical backgroundEdit

Much of the today's North Goa territories (Pernem, Bicholim, and Sattari) were under the Kingdom of Sawantwadi. While Ponda was sometimes with Sunda Kingdom or Marathas or Kingdom of Sawantwadi. Hence these territories were seen as safe haven for the Hindus who were living under continuous fear of the Portuguese Inquisition. These territories were conquered by Portuguese as part of New Conquest in late 18th centuries. These territories then remain with the Portuguese till 1961 when it was annexed by India.

Goa and two other former Portuguese enclaves became the union territory of Goa, Daman and Diu, and Goa was organised into a single district in 1965. On 30 May 1987, Goa attained statehood (while Daman and Diu remained a union territory), and Goa was reorganised into two districts, North Goa and South Goa.

Portuguese in Goa (1510-1961)Edit

Advent of Portuguese (1498)Edit

Lured by the thrill of discovery and goaded by the prospect of seeking Christians and spices Portugal embarked on perilous voyages to the Orient which culminated in Bartholomew Dias’ trip round the Cape of Good Hope. This spectacular breakthrough opened new vistas. A decade later Vasco Da Gama set off eastwards and in 1498 landed in Calicut and broke the Arab monopoly of trade.

Estado Da India (1510)Edit

Fired with the dream of establishing an Eastern Empire for Portugal, Afonso De Albuquerque, Governor-General of Goa, set to acquire stragetic centers also the trade route. At the invitation of the Admiral of the Vijayanagar’s fleet, he occupied Goa with little initial opposition. Though temporarily routed, he triumphantly regained possession of the city on November 25, 1510 and kneeling in the public square he dedicated Goa to St. Catherine whose feast was on that day.

In 1530 Goa became the capital of the Portuguese Empire in the East and mistress of the sea from the Cape of Good Hope to the China Sea.

St. Francis Xavier (1542-1552)Edit

The arrival in 1542 of a young Spanish nobleman turned Jesuit, with a brilliant background of academic learning, created an impact that was tremendous. His compassion for the weak and the downtrodden, his dynamic zeal and his innate holiness edified many. Two years after his death in 1552, the incorrupt body of the saint was enshrined in Goa. It continued to attract pilgrims from all over the world even to this day.

India’s First Printing press (1556)Edit

The first printing press of moveable types in the whole of India printed Doutrina Christa written by Francis Xavier & Garcia de Orta called Colloquios Dos Simples Drogos Medicinais & an early work of the famous poet Luis De Camoes entitled Os Disparates Da India.

Indian Incersions (1946-1961)Edit

Jai Hind Movement (1946)Edit

To intensify the flickering torch of freedom, the Indian Socialist leader, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia, courted arrest on June 18, 1946 by defiantly addressing a mammoth meeting in Goa.

In August 1946, at Londa on the border, a mass meeting of Goan nationalist workers charted out a plan of non-violent action. To express the peoples’s longing for freedom, satyagrahas were launched till the year ended in different parts of the Portuguese enclaves and resulted in 1500 Goans being imprisoned and the ring leaders deported.

Goa Action Committee (1953)Edit

After the French withdrawal from India a futile attempt was made by the Government of India to negotiate with the Portugal for a peaceful transfer of its possession to the Indian Union. Consequently, the Goa Action Committee was formed in Bombay to awaken sympathy for its cause within the country and abroad.

Operation Vijaya (1961)Edit

In 1958 all parties amalgamated under the banner of Goan Political Convention presided over by Professor Aloysius Soares.

In a carefully planned action by Armed forces, the Government of India entered Goa. Scant resistance was offered and on December 1961 with hardly any bloodshed, Goa was liberated from the Portuguese to remove the last vestiges of foreign domination in India.

GeographyEdit

Its geographical position is marked by 15o 48’ 00" N to 14o 53’ 54" N latitudes and 73o E to 75o E longitudes

ClimateEdit

Climate data for Panaji (1971–1990)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 36.6
(97.9)
39.2
(102.6)
39.0
(102.2)
39.8
(103.6)
38.6
(101.5)
35.9
(96.6)
32.3
(90.1)
34.0
(93.2)
33.2
(91.8)
37.2
(99)
37.2
(99)
36.6
(97.9)
39.8
(103.6)
Average high °C (°F) 32.0
(89.6)
31.7
(89.1)
32.2
(90)
33.1
(91.6)
33.4
(92.1)
30.3
(86.5)
29.1
(84.4)
28.7
(83.7)
29.8
(85.6)
31.8
(89.2)
32.9
(91.2)
32.7
(90.9)
31.5
(88.7)
Daily mean °C (°F) 26.0
(78.8)
26.3
(79.3)
27.7
(81.9)
29.3
(84.7)
30.0
(86)
27.6
(81.7)
26.7
(80.1)
26.4
(79.5)
26.9
(80.4)
27.9
(82.2)
27.6
(81.7)
26.9
(80.4)
27.4
(81.3)
Average low °C (°F) 19.9
(67.8)
20.7
(69.3)
23.2
(73.8)
25.5
(77.9)
26.5
(79.7)
24.8
(76.6)
24.3
(75.7)
24.0
(75.2)
24.0
(75.2)
23.9
(75)
22.2
(72)
21.0
(69.8)
23.3
(73.9)
Record low °C (°F) 14.4
(57.9)
13.3
(55.9)
17.5
(63.5)
19.4
(66.9)
20.9
(69.6)
20.9
(69.6)
20.5
(68.9)
21.7
(71.1)
21.0
(69.8)
20.0
(68)
15.3
(59.5)
15.7
(60.3)
13.3
(55.9)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 0
(0)
0
(0)
1
(0.04)
5
(0.2)
56
(2.2)
861
(33.9)
853
(33.58)
622
(24.49)
237
(9.33)
111
(4.37)
35
(1.38)
2
(0.08)
2,813
(110.75)
Average rainy days (≥ 1.0 mm) 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.6 3.8 24.0 28.2 27.2 14.9 6.6 3.5 0.3 109.3
Average relative humidity (%) 67 69 71 71 71 85 88 89 86 80 70 64 76
Mean monthly sunshine hours 311.8 290.2 291.0 289.0 296.5 125.1 105.7 122.1 177.1 247.7 272.6 299.3 2,828.1
Source #1: NOAA[4]
Source #2: India Meteorological Department (record high and low up to 2010)[5]

AdministrationEdit

The administrative headquarters of the district is Panjim, which is also the capital of the state of Goa. The district forms part of a greater region called the Konkan. Nila Mohanan of the Indian Administrative Service is the District Collector.[6]

The district is divided into three subdivisions – Panjim, Mapusa, and Bicholim; and five taluksTiswadi (Panjim), Bardez (Mapusa), Pernem, Bicholim, and Sattari (Valpoi).

Ponda Taluka shifted from North Goa to South Goa in January 2015.

DemographicsEdit

PopulationEdit

According to the 2011 census North Goa has a population of 817,761[7] which is roughly equal to the nation of Comoros[8] or the US state of South Dakota.[9] This gives it a ranking of 480th in India (out of a total of 640). The district has a population density of 471 inhabitants per square kilometre (1,220/sq mi). Its population growth rate over the decade 2001-2011 was 7.8%. North Goa has a sex ratio of 959 females for every 1000 males, and a literacy rate of 88.85%.[7]

LanguageEdit

Konkani is the mother tongue of a majority of the people living in North Goa district. Marathi is spoken by a substantial number of people. English and Hindi are understood by a majority of the population. Portuguese is also spoken and understood by a small number of people.

ReligionEdit

Religion in North Goa (2011)

  Hinduism (76.06%)
  Christianity (16.40%)
  Islam (7.08%)
  Sikhism (0.08%)
  Buddhism (0.07%)
  Jainism (0.07%)
  Other or not religious (0.42%)

[10]

TourismEdit

 
Candolim Beach Goa
 
Fort Aguada Light House

North Goa is mainly famous for beaches which include Anjuna Beach, Candolim Beach, Mandrem Beach, Calangute Beach, Arambol Beach and a few others. Other tourist sites include Fort Aguada, The church of Mae De Dues and the temple of Boghdeshwara.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20180717054659/https://www.heraldgoa.in/Goa-News/Levinson-Martins-appointed-North-Goa-Collector/133417.html
  2. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20180717054856/http://englishnews.thegoan.net/story.php?id=44171
  3. ^ http://www.census2011.co.in/census/district/180-north-goa.html
  4. ^ "Goa (Panjim) Climate Normals 1971-1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved April 15, 2015.
  5. ^ "Ever recorded Maximum and minimum temperatures up to 2010" (PDF). India Meteorological Department. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 21, 2013. Retrieved April 15, 2015.
  6. ^ http://northgoa.nic.in/collector.htm
  7. ^ a b "District Census 2011". Census2011.co.in. 2011. Retrieved 2011-09-30.
  8. ^ US Directorate of Intelligence. "Country Comparison:Population". Retrieved 2011-10-01. Comoros 794,683 July 2011 est.
  9. ^ "2010 Resident Population Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2010-12-25. Retrieved 2011-09-30. South Dakota 814,180
  10. ^ "North Goa District Population Census 2011, Goa literacy sex ratio and density". www.census2011.co.in. Retrieved 2015-12-18.
  11. ^ "The Top 10 Things to Do in North Goa District 2017 - Must See Attractions in North Goa District, India | TripAdvisor". www.tripadvisor.in. Retrieved 25 November 2017.

External linksEdit