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Norfolk Wildlife Trust

The Norfolk Wildlife Trust, formerly known as the Norfolk Naturalists' Trust, is one of almost 50 wildlife trusts throughout the United Kingdom managing sites in the English county of Norfolk. Founded in 1926, it is the oldest of all the trusts having over 35,000 members and over 1,000 volunteers.[1] It manages 32 nature reserves.

Norfolk Wildlife Trust
Norfolk Wildlife Trust Logo.jpg
Formation 1926
Headquarters Bewick House
Membership
35,000
Website Norfolk Wildlife Trust website
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

Contents

KeyEdit

SitesEdit

Site Photograph Area[a] Location[a] Public access Classifications Description
Alderfen Broad[2]   20 hectares
(49 acres)
Norwich
52°43′26″N 1°28′59″E / 52.724°N 1.483°E / 52.724; 1.483 (Alderfen Broad)
TG 353 197
YES Ramsar,[3] SAC,[4] SPA,[5] SSSI[6] This area of fenland peat has open water, carr woodland and reedswamp. Breeding birds include the great crested grebe, water rail, grasshopper warbler and reed warbler.[7]
Barton Broad[8]   164 hectares
(410 acres)
Norwich
52°43′59″N 1°28′44″E / 52.733°N 1.479°E / 52.733; 1.479 (Barton Broad)
TG 350 207
YES NCR,[9] NNR,[10] Ramsar,[3] SAC,[4] SPA[5] SSSI[11] The Broad was created in the Middle Ages by digging for peat and the River Ant was later diverted through it, which allowed navigation. It has diverse aquatic plants and fish, and the surrounding fens have nationally rare plants and invertebrates.[8]
Booton Common[12]   8 hectares
(20 acres)
Norwich
52°45′43″N 1°07′37″E / 52.762°N 1.127°E / 52.762; 1.127 (Booton Common)
TG 111 228
YES SAC,[13] SSSI[14] The common has diverse habitats, including wet calcareous fen grassland, acid heath, tall fen, alder woodland and a stream. Wet hollows are floristically rich and there are a variety of breeding birds.[15]
Cley Marshes[16]   160 hectares
(400 acres)
Holt
52°57′14″N 1°03′22″E / 52.954°N 1.056°E / 52.954; 1.056 (Cley Marshes)
TG 054 440
FEE AONB,[17] GCR,[18] NCR,[19] Ramsar,[20] SAC,[21] SPA,[22] SSSI[23] This is the NWT's oldest reserve, purchased in 1926 as a bird sanctuary. It has saline lagoons, a shingle beach, grazing marshes and reedbeds, which support many wintering and migrating wildfowl and waders.[16]
Cockshoot Broad[24]   5 hectares
(12 acres)
Norwich
52°41′42″N 1°27′58″E / 52.695°N 1.466°E / 52.695; 1.466 (Cockshoot Broad)
TG 343 165
YES NCR,[25] NNR[26] Ramsar,[3] SAC,[4] SPA[5] SSSI[27] The water quality of this broad is very high and it has large beds of water lilies, which provide a habitat for many insects, including red eyed and variable damselflies.[24]
East Winch Common[28]   31 hectares
(77 acres)
King's Lynn
52°42′58″N 0°30′43″E / 52.716°N 0.512°E / 52.716; 0.512 (East Winch Common)
TF 698 161
YES SSSI[29] This site is mainly wet acid heath on peat, and it is dominated by heather and cross-leaved heath. There are many wet hollows, which have diverse fen and mire flora, and areas of young woodland.[30]
East Wretham Heath[31]   143 hectares
(350 acres)
Thetford
52°27′47″N 0°48′50″E / 52.463°N 0.814°E / 52.463; 0.814 (East Wretham Heath)
TL 913 887
YES NCR,[32] SAC,[33] SPA,[34] SSSI[35] The principal ecological interest of this site lies in areas of Breckland grassland and two meres, which are supplied by ground water, and fluctuate irregularly. These conditions have led to unusual plants communities which are tolerant of alternate wetting and drying, such as reed canary grass and amphibious bistort.[36]
Foxley Wood[37]   123 hectares
(300 acres)
Dereham
52°45′54″N 1°02′10″E / 52.765°N 1.036°E / 52.765; 1.036 (Foxley Wood)
TG 049 229
YES NCR,[38] NNR,[39] SSSI[40] This is the largest area of ancient woodland in the county. The flora is diverse, with more than 250 species recorded, and invertebrates include several rare butterflies, such as the purple emperor and white admiral.[41]
Hethel Old Thorn [42]   0.025 hectares
(0.062 acres)
Norwich
52°33′32″N 1°12′04″E / 52.559°N 1.201°E / 52.559; 1.201 (Hethel Old Thorn)
TG 171 005
YES This is the smallest wildlife trust nature reserve in Britain, consisting of one ancient hawthorn tree, which may date to the thirteenth century. In 1755 its girth was recorded as 9 feet 1 inch, and it has now decayed to a much smaller size, but it is still healthy.[42]
Hickling Broad[43]   600 hectares
(1,500 acres)
Norwich
52°44′35″N 1°35′46″E / 52.743°N 1.596°E / 52.743; 1.596 (Hickling Broad)
TG 428 222
FEE AONB,[17] GCR,[18] NCR,[44] NNR,[45] Ramsar,[3] SAC,[4] SPA,[5] SSSI[46] This is the largest of The Broads, and it has large breeding populations of waterbirds. Rare insects include the swallowtail butterfly and Norfolk hawker dragonfly, and there are mammals such as red deer and Chinese water deer.[43]
Hoe Rough[47]   12 hectares
(30 acres)
Dereham
52°42′47″N 0°55′37″E / 52.713°N 0.927°E / 52.713; 0.927 (Hoe Rough)
TF 978 168
YES SSSI[48] This is mixture of grassland and wet fen. Around 200 species of invertebrates have been recorded, including the rare great crested newt. Notable plants include green-winged and early marsh orchids.[47]
Holme Dunes [49]   192 hectares
(470 acres)
Hunstanton
52°58′26″N 0°33′04″E / 52.974°N 0.551°E / 52.974; 0.551 (Holme Dunes)
TF 714 449
FEE AONB,[17] GCR,[18] NCR,[19] NNR,[50] Ramsar,[20] SAC,[21] SPA,[22] SSSI[23] This site provides a refuge for many migrating birds such as wheatears, wrynecks, yellow-browed warblers and barred warblers. Other fauna include natterjack toads, butterflies and dragonflies.[49]
Honeypot Wood [51]   10 hectares
(25 acres)
Dereham
52°41′31″N 0°51′36″E / 52.692°N 0.860°E / 52.692; 0.860 (Honeypot Wood)
TF 934 143
YES SSSI[52] This is an ancient coppiced wood on calcareous soil. It has a rich ground layer, which is dominated by dog's mercury, and other flora include greater butterfly-orchid and broad-leaved helleborine. A total of 208 plant species have been recorded.[53]
Lolly Moor [54] 3 hectares
(7.4 acres)
Dereham
52°39′14″N 0°56′38″E / 52.654°N 0.944°E / 52.654; 0.944 (Lolly Moor)
TF 992 103
YES
Lower Wood, Ashwellthorpe[55]   37 hectares
(91 acres)
Norwich
52°32′10″N 1°09′29″E / 52.536°N 1.158°E / 52.536; 1.158 (Lower Wood, Ashwellthorpe)
TM 143 978
YES SSSI[56] This ancient wood on chalky boulder clay has a diverse ground flora with uncommon species such as wood spurge, early-purple orchid, common twayblade, ramsons, water avens and woodruff.[57]
Martham Broad[58]   60 hectares
(150 acres)
Great Yarmouth
52°43′26″N 1°39′00″E / 52.724°N 1.650°E / 52.724; 1.650 (Martham Broad)
TG 466 203
YES NNR,[59] Ramsar,[3] SAC,[4] SPA,[5] SSSI[46] This reserve is composed of two shallow broads divided by the River Thurne, together with fen, reedbeds and marshes. There are a number of bat species and breeding birds include bearded tits, common terns, Cetti's warblers and marsh harriers.[58]
Narborough Railway Line[60]   8 hectares
(20 acres)
King's Lynn
52°40′34″N 0°35′13″E / 52.676°N 0.587°E / 52.676; 0.587 (Narborough Railway Line)
TF 750 118
PL SSSI[61] This nineteenth-century embankment is probably the most ecologically diverse chalk grassland site in the county, with many flowering plants which attract a wide range of butterflies. There is also a variety of mosses and molluscs.[62]
New Buckenham Common[63]   37 hectares
(91 acres)
Norwich
52°28′19″N 1°04′34″E / 52.472°N 1.076°E / 52.472; 1.076 (New Buckenham Common)
TM 090 905
YES SSSI[64] This unimproved grassland is traditionally managed by grazing. It has the largest colony of green-winged orchids in the county, and there are a stream and pool which have aquatic plants.[65]
Pigneys Wood [66]   23.5 hectares
(58 acres)
North Walsham
52°50′13″N 1°24′25″E / 52.837°N 1.407°E / 52.837; 1.407 (Pigneys Wood)
TG 296 321
YES LNR[67] This wood has 40 different species of trees, most of which have been planted since 1993, but there is a 450 year old oak. There is also a range of birds, butterflies and dragonflies. Mammals include otters, water voles and badgers.[66]
Ranworth Broad[68]   136 hectares
(340 acres)
Norwich
52°40′55″N 1°29′13″E / 52.682°N 1.487°E / 52.682; 1.487 (Ranworth Broad)
TG 358 151
YES NCR,[25] NNR [26] Ramsar,[3] SAC,[4] SPA,[5] SSSI[27] Many species of birds can be seen from the floating Broads Wildlife Centre such as great crested grebes, wigeons, gadwalls, kingfishers and cormorants. There are also areas of woodland and reedbeds.[68]
Ringstead Downs[69]   11 hectares
(27 acres)
Hunstanton
52°55′44″N 0°32′13″E / 52.929°N 0.537°E / 52.929; 0.537 (Ringstead Downs)
TF 706 399
YES AONB,[70] SSSI[71] This is a dry chalk valley which was carved out by glacial meltwaters It is species-rich as it has never been ploughed, and it is the largest surviving area of chalk downland surviving in the county. The butterflies are diverse.[72]
Roydon Common and Grimston Warren[73]   365 hectares
(900 acres)
King's Lynn
52°46′37″N 0°30′58″E / 52.777°N 0.516°E / 52.777; 0.516 (Roydon Common and Grimston Warren)
TF 698 229
YES NCR,[74] NNR,[75] Ramsar,[76] SAC,[77] SSSI[78] The common is described by Natural England as "one of the best examples in Britain of a lowland mixed valley mire". It has diverse habitats, including wet acid heath, calcareous fen and dry heath on acid sands. There are rare plants, birds and insects, including the black darter dragonfly.[79]
Salthouse Marshes[80]   66 hectares
(160 acres)
Holt
52°57′22″N 1°05′53″E / 52.956°N 1.098°E / 52.956; 1.098 (Salthouse Marshes)
TG 082 443
YES AONB,[17] GCR,[18] NCR,[19] Ramsar,[20] SAC,[21] SPA,[22] SSSI[23] This site has grazing marsh and small pools. Birds include snow buntings, Lapland buntings, little egrets, shore larks and barn owls.[80]
Scarning Fen [81]   4 hectares
(9.9 acres)
Dereham
52°40′12″N 0°55′41″E / 52.670°N 0.928°E / 52.670; 0.928 (Scarning Fen)
TF 981 121
YES NCR,[82] SAC,[13] SSSI[83] This small reserve has chalky valley mire, carr and grassland. Twenty-nine nationally scarce invertebrates have been recorded, and it is the only site in the county for the small red damselfly. There are a number of rare plants, including liverworts and mosses.[81]
Sparham Pools [84] 12.2 hectares
(30 acres)
Norwich
52°43′05″N 1°04′16″E / 52.718°N 1.071°E / 52.718; 1.071 (Sparham Pools)
TG 075 178
YES
Syderstone Common[85]   24 hectares
(59 acres)
King's Lynn
52°51′07″N 0°43′19″E / 52.852°N 0.722°E / 52.852; 0.722 (Syderstone Common)
TF 834 318
YES SSSI[86] The common has heath and grassland areas in the valley of the River Tat. Pools on sand and gravel provide suitable habitats for five species of breeding amphibians, including the nationally rare natterjack toad.[87]
Thompson Common [88]   140 hectares
(350 acres)
Attleborough
52°37′59″N 0°51′36″E / 52.633°N 0.860°E / 52.633; 0.860 (Thompson Common)
TL 941 966
YES LNR,[89] NCR[90] SAC,[91] SSSI[92] This grassland site in the valley of a tributary of the River Wissey has a number of pingos, damp and water filled depressions formed by the melting of ice at the end of the last glaciation. It also has a lake called Thompson Water which, together with its surrounding reedswamp, is important for breeding birds.[93]
Thorpe Marshes [94]   25 hectares
(62 acres)
Norwich
52°37′30″N 1°20′53″E / 52.625°N 1.348°E / 52.625; 1.348 (Thorpe Marshes)
TG 267 083
FP This site has a lake called St Andrew’s Broad, which hosts waterbirds such as great crested grebes, cormorants, tufted ducks, gadwalls and grey herons. There are also flower rich marshes, and dragonflies and damselflies inhabit the many dykes.[94]
Thursford Wood[95]   10 hectares
(25 acres)
Fakenham
52°51′40″N 0°56′17″E / 52.861°N 0.938°E / 52.861; 0.938 (Thursford Wood)
TF 979 333
YES The oak trees in this wood are some of the oldest in the county, and some may be over 500 years old. The site also has a variety of woodland birds, as well as many ferns and fungi.[95]
Upton Broad and Marshes[96]   318 hectares
(790 acres)
Norwich
52°40′08″N 1°31′08″E / 52.669°N 1.519°E / 52.669; 1.519 (Upton Broad and Marshes)
TG 380 137
YES NCR,[97] Ramsar,[3] SAC,[4] SPA,[5] SSSI[98] This is described by Natural England as "an outstanding example of unreclaimed wetland and grazing marsh". Its rich invertebrate fauna includes eighteen species of freshwater snail, and an outstanding variety of dragonflies and damselflies, including the nationally rare Norfolk hawker.[99]
Wayland Wood [100]   34 hectares
(84 acres)
Thetford
52°33′36″N 0°50′13″E / 52.560°N 0.837°E / 52.560; 0.837 (Wayland Wood)
TL 924 996
YES SSSI[101] This semi-natural wood on wet calcareous boulder clay is managed by coppicing. Breeding birds include woodcocks, lesser spotted woodpeckeres and nuthatches.[102]
Weeting Heath[103]   138 hectares
(340 acres)
Brandon
52°27′47″N 0°35′06″E / 52.463°N 0.585°E / 52.463; 0.585 (Weeting Heath)
TL 757 881
FEE NCR,[104] NNR,[105] SAC,[33] SPA,[34] SSSI[106] This grass and lichen heath is grazed by rabbits. It has a high density of breeding birds, including stone-curlews. One arable field is reserved for uncommon Breckland plants.[107]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b The area and location are taken from the Wildlife Trust page for each site.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Norfolk Wildlife Trust About". Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  2. ^ "Alderfen Broad". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Designated Sites View: Broadland". Ramsar Site. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Designated Sites View: The Broads". Special Area of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Designated Sites View: Broadland". Special Protection Area. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  6. ^ "Designated Sites View: Alderfen Broad". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 15 May 2018. 
  7. ^ "Alderfen Broad citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 June 2018. 
  8. ^ a b "Barton Broad". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  9. ^ Ratcliffe, p. 307
  10. ^ "Designated Sites View: Ant Broads and Marshes". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  11. ^ "Designated Sites View: Ant Broads and Marshes". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 15 May 2018. 
  12. ^ "Booton Common". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  13. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Norfolk Valley Fens". Special Area of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  14. ^ "Designated Sites View: Booton Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 15 May 2018. 
  15. ^ "Booton Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 June 2018. 
  16. ^ a b "Cley Marshes". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  17. ^ a b c d "Norfolk Coast AONB Management Plan 2014-19: Other Conservation Designations within the AONB" (PDF). Norfolk Coast AONB. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  18. ^ a b c d "North Norfolk Coast (Coastal Geomorphology of England)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  19. ^ a b c Ratcliffe, pp. 10-11
  20. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: North Norfolk Coast". Ramsar Site. Natural England. Retrieved 1 June 2018. 
  21. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: North Norfolk Coast". Special Area of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 1 June 2018. 
  22. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: North Norfolk Coast". Special Protection Area. Natural England. Retrieved 1 June 2018. 
  23. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: North Norfolk Coast". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  24. ^ a b "Cockshoot Broad". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  25. ^ a b Ratcliffe, pp. 55-56, 209
  26. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Bure Marshes". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  27. ^ a b "Designated Sites View:Bure Broads and Marshes". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  28. ^ "East Winch Common". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  29. ^ "Designated Sites View: East Winch Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  30. ^ "East Winch Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 10 June 2018. 
  31. ^ "East Wretham Heath". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  32. ^ Ratcliffe, p. 131
  33. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Breckland". Special Area of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  34. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Breckland". Special Protection Area. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  35. ^ "Designated Sites View: East Wretham Heath". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  36. ^ "East Wretham Heath citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 June 2018. 
  37. ^ "Foxley Wood". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  38. ^ Ratcliffe, p. 59
  39. ^ "Designated Sites View: Foxley Wood". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 5 June 2018. 
  40. ^ "Designated Sites View: Foxley Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  41. ^ "Foxley Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 June 2018. 
  42. ^ a b "Hethel Old Thorn". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  43. ^ a b "Hickling Broad". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  44. ^ Ratcliffe, pp. 170-71
  45. ^ "Designated Sites View: Hickling Broad". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  46. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Upper Thurne Broads and Marshes". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 May 2018. 
  47. ^ a b "Hoe Rough". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  48. ^ "Designated Sites View: Beetley and Hoe Meadows". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 15 May 2018. 
  49. ^ a b "Holme Dunes". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  50. ^ "Designated Sites View: Holme Dunes". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 1 June 2018. 
  51. ^ "Honeypot Wood". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  52. ^ "Designated Sites View: Honeypot Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  53. ^ "Honeypot Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 12 June 2018. 
  54. ^ "Lolly Moor". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  55. ^ "Lower Wood, Ashwellthorpe". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  56. ^ "Designated Sites View: Lower Wood, Ashwellthorpe". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  57. ^ "Lower Wood, Ashwellthorpe citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 12 June 2018. 
  58. ^ a b "Martham Broad". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  59. ^ "Designated Sites View: Martham Broad". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 5 June 2018. 
  60. ^ "Narborough Railway Line". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  61. ^ "Designated Sites View: Narborough Railway Embankment". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  62. ^ "Narborough Railway Embankment citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 June 2018. 
  63. ^ "New Buckenham Common". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  64. ^ "Designated Sites View: New Buckenham Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 16 May 2018. 
  65. ^ "New Buckenham Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 June 2018. 
  66. ^ a b "Pigneys Wood". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  67. ^ "Pigney's Wood". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  68. ^ a b "Ranworth Broad". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  69. ^ "Ringstead Downs". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  70. ^ "Norfolk Coast AONB Management Plan 2014-19: Other Conservation Designations within the AONB" (PDF). Norfolk Coast AONB. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  71. ^ "Designated Sites View: Ringstead Downs". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 May 2018. 
  72. ^ "Ringstead Downs citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 31 May 2018. 
  73. ^ "Roydon Common and Grimston Warren". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  74. ^ Ratcliffe, pp. 130–31, 212–13
  75. ^ "Designated Sites View: Roydon Common". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 31 May 2018. 
  76. ^ "Designated Sites View: Roydon Common". Ramsar Site. Natural England. Retrieved 31 May 2018. 
  77. ^ "Designated Sites View: Roydon Common and Dersingham Bog". Special Area of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 31 May 2018. 
  78. ^ "Designated Sites View: Roydon Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 May 2018. 
  79. ^ "Roydon Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 31 May 2018. 
  80. ^ a b "Salthouse Marshes". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  81. ^ a b "Scarning Fen". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  82. ^ Ratcliffe, pp. 213-14
  83. ^ "Designated Sites View: Potter and Scarning Fens, East Dereham". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 May 2018. 
  84. ^ "Sparham Pools". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  85. ^ "Syderstone Common". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  86. ^ "Designated Sites View: Syderstone Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 May 2018. 
  87. ^ "Syderstone Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 20 June 2018. 
  88. ^ "Thompson Common". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  89. ^ "Designated Sites View: Great Eastern Pingo Trail". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 4 June 2018. 
  90. ^ Ratcliffe, pp. 138-39
  91. ^ "Designated Sites View: Norfolk Valley Fens". Special Area of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 25 May 2018. 
  92. ^ "Designated Sites View: Thompson Water, Carr and Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  93. ^ "Thompson Water, Carr and Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 21 June 2018. 
  94. ^ a b "Thorpe Marshes". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  95. ^ a b "Thursford Wood". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  96. ^ "Upton Broad and Marshes". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  97. ^ Ratcliffe, pp. 172, 306-07
  98. ^ "Designated Sites View: Upton Broad & Marshes". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 May 2018. 
  99. ^ "Upton Broad and Marshes citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 21 June 2018. 
  100. ^ "Wayland Wood". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  101. ^ "Designated Sites View: Wayland Wood, Watton". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 May 2018. 
  102. ^ "Wayland Wood, Watton citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  103. ^ "Weeting Heath". Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 21 May 2018. 
  104. ^ Ratcliffe, p. 135-36
  105. ^ "Designated Sites View: Weeting Heath". National Nature Reserves. Natural England. Retrieved 2 June 2018. 
  106. ^ "Designated Sites View: Weeting Heath". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 May 2018. 
  107. ^ "Weeting Heath citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 

SourcesEdit

  • Ratcliffe, Derek, ed. (1977). A Nature Conservation Review. 2. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-21403-3. 

External linksEdit