Nigerian Open

The Nigerian Open was a golf tournament in Nigeria, played between 1969 and 1999. It was generally played at the Ikoyi Club in Ikoyi, Lagos.[1] From 1997 to 1999 it was played at the IBB International Golf & Country Club in Abuja.[citation needed] It was a Challenge Tour event between 1990 and 1993, having previously been part of the Safari Tour.

Nigerian Open
LocationIkoyi, Lagos, Nigeria
Established1969
Course(s)Ikoyi Club
Tour(s)Challenge Tour (1991–93)
FormatStroke play
Final year1999
Aggregate255 Peter Tupling (1981)
To par−29 (as above)
Johan Sköld

The Safari Tour can be traced back to the sixties, when British professionals escaped the northern European winter and taught at clubs throughout Africa. Many of the professionals also took their assistants with them to gain extra experience, and as the numbers involved in these tours increased, so events in the host countries evolved. The driving force behind the African events was Dai Rees, who would liaise with local sponsors and organisers on behalf of the professionals. By 1975, the size of the Safari Tour had become too much to administer, and so the European Tournament Players' Division (now known as European Tour) took over the representation of the professionals. As the European Tour began to expand its schedule globally, in 1991 the five Safari Tour events became part of the developmental Challenge Tour.

In 1981, England's Peter Tupling set the record low 72 hole score in professional tournament golf, when he won the title with a 29 under par total of 255.[2] Notable past champions include major winners Vijay Singh and Sandy Lyle and former Ryder Cup player Gordon J. Brand.

WinnersEdit

Year Winner Country Score
1999 Johan Sköld   Sweden 278
1998 José Cantero   Argentina 274 (−14)
1997 Roberto Gonzalez   Argentina
1995 Lateef Lasisi   Nigeria
1994 Emos Korblah   Ghana 275
Year Winner Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up Ref
1993 Gordon Manson   Scotland 274 2 strokes   Frédéric Regard [3]
1992 No tournament due to rescheduling
1991 James Lebbie   Sierra Leone 270 4 strokes   Paul Eales [4]
1990 Wayne Stephens   England 198[a] −15 6 strokes   Chris Platts [5]
1989 Vijay Singh   Fiji 279 −5 1 stroke   Gordon J. Brand
  Jeff Pinsent
  Ian Spencer
[6]
1988 Vijay Singh   Fiji 281 −3 Playoff[b]   Mike Miller [7]
1987 No tournament
1986 Gordon J. Brand   England 272 −12 8 strokes   Malcolm MacKenzie [8]
1985 Bill Longmuir   Scotland 277 −3 2 strokes   David Jagger [9]
1984 Ewen Murray   Scotland 271 −13 1 stroke   Bill Longmuir [10]
1983 Gordon J. Brand   England 275 −9 4 strokes   Gary Cullen [11]
1982 David Jagger   England 274 −10 Playoff[c]   Ian Woosnam [12]
1981 Peter Tupling   England 255 −29 6 strokes   Bill Longmuir [13]
1980 Bill Longmuir   Scotland 264 −20 4 strokes   Tommy Horton [14]
1979 John Morgan   England 269 −15 5 strokes   Pip Elson
  Tommy Horton
[15]
1978 Sandy Lyle   Scotland 269 −15 Playoff[d]   Michael King [16]
1977 David Jagger   England 273 −11 Playoff[e]   Malcolm Gregson [17]
1976 Bill Longmuir   Scotland 209 −4 1 stroke   Pip Elson
  Carl Mason
1975 David Jagger   England 270 −14 Playoff[f]   Harry Bannerman
  Peter Dawson
[18]
1974 Jack Newton   Australia 275 −9 4 strokes   Eamonn Darcy
  Christy O'Connor Jnr
  Ronnie Shade
[19]
1973 Tommy Horton   England 267 −17 3 strokes   Malcolm Gregson [20]
1972 No tournament due to rescheduling
1971 Lee Elder   United States 267 −17 5 strokes   John Cook [21]
1970 John Cook   England 276 1 stroke   John Garner [22]
1969 Marshall Douglas   Scotland 281 5 strokes   Ian Wrigley [23]
  1. ^ Tournament contested over three rounds due to local elections.
  2. ^ Singh won with a par on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff.
  3. ^ Jagger won with a birdie on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff.
  4. ^ Lyle won on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff.
  5. ^ Jagger won on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff.
  6. ^ Jagger won with a birdie on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Ikoyi course". Ikoyi Golf Community Nigeria Association. Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  2. ^ Hopkins, John (19 March 2003). "Matharu hints at bright future on day in sun". London: The Times. Retrieved 26 November 2008.
  3. ^ https://www.europeantour.com/challenge-tour/nigerian-open-1993/results?round=4
  4. ^ https://www.europeantour.com/challenge-tour/nigerian-open-1992/results?round=4
  5. ^ McCormack, Mark H. (1991). The World of Professional Golf 1991. Chapmans. pp. 262–263, 502. ISBN 1855925583.
  6. ^ "Gordon J Brand". The Glasgow Herald. 20 November 1989. p. 19.
  7. ^ McCormack, Mark H. (1989). World of Professional Golf 1989. Collins Willow. pp. 235–236, 464. ISBN 000218284X.
  8. ^ "Eight-stroke Lagos victory for Brand". The Glasgow Herald. 17 February 1986. p. 9.
  9. ^ "Nigerian pay-off for Longmuir". The Glasgow Herald. 25 February 1985. p. 20.
  10. ^ "Murray holds off Longmuir for Nigerian Open victory". The Glasgow Herald. 27 February 1984. p. 17.
  11. ^ "Nigerian Open". The Guardian. 28 February 1983. p. 19.
  12. ^ "Golf". The Glasgow Herald. 8 February 1982. p. 17.
  13. ^ "Britain's Peter Tupling". The Glasgow Herald. 23 February 1981. p. 18.
  14. ^ "Golf | Lagos". The Times. 25 February 1980. p. 10. Retrieved 5 March 2020 – via The Times Digital Archive.
  15. ^ "John Morgan". The Glasgow Herald. 27 February 1979. p. 23.
  16. ^ "Bright to Sandy Lyle's Career". The Glasgow Herald. 28 February 1978. p. 23.
  17. ^ "David Jagger". The Glasgow Herald. 1 March 1977. p. 31.
  18. ^ "Golf". The Observer. 23 February 1975. p. 19.
  19. ^ "Newton in rich Nigerian win". The Age. 25 February 1974. p. 25.
  20. ^ "Horton wins Nigerian Open". The Glasgow Herald. 26 February 1973. p. 4.
  21. ^ "Easy victory for Elder". The Glasgow Herald. 6 December 1971. p. 4.
  22. ^ "Douglas third despite 66". The Glasgow Herald. 7 December 1970. p. 5.
  23. ^ "Douglas wins in Lagos". The Glasgow Herald. 5 January 1970. p. 4.