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Nicolae Dunca (1837 – June 8, 1862) was a Romanian military officers who served in several conflicts in Europe and in the American Civil War.

Nicolae Dunca
Nicolae Dunca (1837-1862).jpg
Nicolae Dunca during the American Civil War
Native name Nicolae Dunca
Born 1837
Iași, Moldavia
Died (1862-06-08)June 8, 1862
Rockingham County, Virginia[1]
Buried Staunton National Cemetery
Allegiance Kingdom of Hungary
United States of America
Service/branch Honved Army
Union Army
Years of service 1862 (USA)
Rank Captain
Unit 12th New York Infantry Regiment

Hungarian Revolution of 1848
Wars of Italian Unification

American Civil War

Dunca was born in 1837 in Iași, Moldavia[2]. He served in the Honved Army during the Hungarian Revolution of 1848 and later was a lieutenant under Figyelmessy on Sicily.[3] Dunca came to the United States and enlisted in the Union Army in March 1862 and, due to his past military experience, was appointed captain in the 12th New York Infantry Regiment. He was later assigned as aide-de-camp to Major General John C. Fremont, whose army was operating in the Shenandoah Valley. Dunca was shot and killed by a Georgian (Pvt. John Long of Co. B, 21st Georgia Infantry) on picket duty at the Battle of Cross Keys on June 8, 1862. When the picket searched Dunca's personal effects, it was discovered that he was carrying a dispatch outlining Gen. Fremont's order of march for the day. Dunca was still a Hungarian citizen at the time of his death.[citation needed] He was buried at Perkey’s Farm, Cross Keys, Virginia, and his remains were later transferred to the Staunton National Cemetery (Section B, Grave 292).

Dunca was not the only who served in the Hungarian army. There were several officers in the Union Army who, although not natives of Hungary, may be classified as Hungarians, for they had been identified with the Hungarians cause, spoke the Hungarian language and attached themselves in America to the Hungarians. Among them were Constantin Blandovski, a Pole who had served in the Honvéd Army and few others.[2]




  • Collins, Darrell L., The Battles of Cross Keys and Port Republic, June 8–9, 1862. H.E. Howard, Inc., Lynchburg, Virginia, 1993. (see p. 68 for a details surrounding Dunca's death)

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