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Nicholas John Collison (born October 26, 1980) is a former American professional basketball player that played his entire career for the Seattle SuperSonics/Oklahoma City Thunder franchise of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was drafted by the SuperSonics in the 2003 NBA draft and retired as a member of the Thunder in 2018. As a college player, he went to two Final Fours with the Kansas Jayhawks.

Nick Collison
Nick Collison.jpg
Collison with the Thunder
Personal information
Born (1980-10-26) October 26, 1980 (age 37)
Orange City, Iowa
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)
Listed weight 255 lb (116 kg)
Career information
High school Iowa Falls (Iowa Falls, Iowa)
College Kansas (1999–2003)
NBA draft 2003 / Round: 1 / Pick: 12th overall
Selected by the Seattle SuperSonics
Playing career 2003–2018
Position Power forward / Center
Number 4
Career history
20032018 Seattle SuperSonics / Oklahoma City Thunder
Career highlights and awards
Career statistics
Points 5,359 (5.9 ppg)
Rebounds 4,701 (5.2 rpg)
Assists 939 (1.0 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Contents

Early life and high school careerEdit

Collison was born in Orange City, Iowa and grew up in Fort Dodge and Iowa Falls. He attended Iowa Falls High School and was a McDonald's All-American in 1999.

College careerEdit

Teaming with fellow Iowan Kirk Hinrich to form one of the best duos in college basketball, Collison helped KU reach two consecutive Final Fours (2002 and 2003). Collison finished his college career as the leading scorer in the history of the Big 12 Conference (since passed by Andre Emmett). In 2003, his Jayhawks lost to Carmelo Anthony and the Syracuse Orange in the National Championship game, 81–78. He also played for the United States national team at the 2002 FIBA World Championship.[1]

Collison's #4 jersey was retired by the Kansas Jayhawks on November 25, 2003 during halftime of the Kansas-Michigan State game in recognition of his achievements over his four-year career (2002–03 Player of the Year, consensus first-team All-America, Big 12 Player of the Year).[2]

Professional careerEdit

Seattle SuperSonics / Oklahoma City Thunder (2003–2018)Edit

 
Collison in a game with the Thunder

Collison was selected by the Seattle SuperSonics with the 12th overall pick in the 2003 NBA draft but missed the 2003–04 season with injuries to both shoulders. He made his regular season NBA debut on November 3, 2004 against the Los Angeles Clippers, scoring three points in the 84-114 loss. He finished his rookie season of 2004–05 having played in all 82 games as he averaged 5.6 points and 4.6 rebounds in 17.0 minutes per game. He went on to play a further three seasons for Seattle before the franchise relocated to Oklahoma City and rebranding as the Thunder. Following the departure of Kevin Durant in 2016, Collison is the only player remaining from the Seattle SuperSonics era (Russell Westbrook was drafted by the Sonics in 2008 but the team relocated before his rookie season).

In his first season with the Thunder in 2008–09, Collison was once again a solid back-up off the bench as he played 71 games with 40 starting assignments. However, despite his productive first five seasons in the league, Collison's numbers dropped over the following years as his points per game averages dropped below six in 2009–10 and below five in 2010–11. Playing more of a power forward role in the lockout shortened 2011–12 season, Collison helped the Thunder reach the 2012 NBA Finals where they faced the Miami Heat. Despite a solid game one victory, the Thunder went on to lose the series in five games.

On February 3, 2015, Collison signed a two-year, $7.5 million contract extension with the Thunder.[3][4]

On July 21, 2017, Collison re-signed with the Thunder to a one-year, minimum salary deal.[5][6].

On May 10, 2018, Collison announced his retirement from professional basketball.[7]

Personal lifeEdit

After the Sonics relocated to Oklahoma City, Collison continued to make his home in Seattle.[8][9]

Collison and his ex-wife, Robbie, have a daughter named Emma.[10][11] His younger brother, Michael, played college basketball for their father's alma mater, Briar Cliff University in Sioux City, Iowa.[12]

NBA career statisticsEdit

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular seasonEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2004–05 Seattle 82 4 17.0 .537 .000 .703 4.6 .4 .4 .6 5.6
2005–06 Seattle 66 27 21.9 .525 .000 .699 5.6 1.1 .3 .5 7.5
2006–07 Seattle 82 56 29.0 .500 .000 .774 8.1 1.0 .6 .8 9.6
2007–08 Seattle 78 35 28.5 .502 .000 .737 9.4 1.4 .6 .8 9.8
2008–09 Oklahoma City 71 40 25.8 .568 .000 .721 6.9 .9 .7 .7 8.2
2009–10 Oklahoma City 75 5 20.8 .589 .250 .692 5.1 .5 .5 .6 5.9
2010–11 Oklahoma City 71 2 21.5 .566 .753 4.5 1.0 .6 .4 4.6
2011–12 Oklahoma City 63 0 20.7 .597 .000 .710 4.3 1.3 .5 .4 4.5
2012–13 Oklahoma City 81 2 19.5 .595 .000 .769 4.1 1.5 .6 .4 5.1
2013–14 Oklahoma City 81 0 16.7 .556 .235 .710 3.6 1.3 .4 .3 4.2
2014–15 Oklahoma City 66 2 16.7 .419 .267 .692 3.8 1.4 .5 .4 4.1
2015–16 Oklahoma City 59 4 11.8 .459 .000 .697 2.9 .9 .3 .3 2.1
2016–17 Oklahoma City 20 0 6.4 .609 000 .625 1.6 .5 .1 .1 1.7
2017–18 Oklahoma City 15 0 5.0 .684 .385 1.3 .3 .0 .0 2.1
Career 910 177 20.4 .534 .208 .723 5.2 1.0 .5 .5 5.9

PlayoffsEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2005 Seattle 11 0 19.8 .607 1.000 .630 5.0 .5 .3 .5 8.4
2010 Oklahoma City 6 0 21.5 .333 .000 .429 4.7 .3 .8 .2 3.2
2011 Oklahoma City 17 0 24.3 .632 .000 .783 5.8 .9 .9 .9 6.7
2012 Oklahoma City 20 0 16.6 .647 .000 .429 3.4 1.0 .6 .3 3.5
2013 Oklahoma City 11 0 16.2 .468 .000 .917 4.6 1.1 .5 1.0 5.0
2014 Oklahoma City 17 2 10.8 .414 .400 .700 2.2 .8 .2 .4 1.9
2016 Oklahoma City 9 0 8.8 .667 .000 .500 1.2 .6 .9 .0 1.0
Career 91 2 16.8 .558 .429 .682 3.8 .8 .6 .5 4.3

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit