Ngaurukehu railway station

Ngaurukehu, Ngarukehu,[1] or Ngaurakehu,[2] was a flag station[3] on the North Island Main Trunk line,[4] in the Ruapehu District of New Zealand. It is in the Hautapu River valley.[5] It was 9.64 km (5.99 mi) north of Mataroa, 3.91 km (2.43 mi) south of Turangarere.[6] Ngaurukehu is part way up a 1 in 70 gradient from Mataroa to Hīhītahi,[7] so that it is 110 m (360 ft) above Mataroa and 62 m (203 ft) below Turangarere.[6] It now has three passing loops.[8]

Ngaurukehu railway station
Ngaurukehu map Sheet N132 1970.jpg
Ngaurukehu railway station on 1970 map
General information
LocationNew Zealand
Coordinates39°36′41″S 175°42′30″E / 39.611300°S 175.708200°E / -39.611300; 175.708200Coordinates: 39°36′41″S 175°42′30″E / 39.611300°S 175.708200°E / -39.611300; 175.708200
Elevation640 m (2,100 ft)
Line(s)North Island Main Trunk
DistanceWellington 270.79 km (168.26 mi)
History
Opened1 July 1909
Closed1992
ElectrifiedJune 1988
Services
Preceding station   Historical railways   Following station
Turangarere
Line open, station closed
  North Island Main Trunk
KiwiRail
  Mataroa
Line open, station closed

HistoryEdit

The line through Ngaurukehu was built and equipped with a telegraph line[9] by the Public Works Department (PWD) in 1906.[10] It was transferred to NZR on 1 July 1908,[11] but sidings north and south of the single track weren't opened until Thursday 1 July 1909. They were added to reduce delays caused by trains waiting to clear each other on the climb from Mataroa to Turangarere.[12] Ngaurukehu was staffed by two tablet porters,[13] with a signalbox and houses.[14] 2 more state houses were built in 1955 and by 1957 the crossing loop had been extended, with motor points and colour light signals. Tenders for further extension of the loop were invited in 1973.[9]

To the north of the station, the 112 m (367 ft) Ngaurukehu, or Rabbit, tunnel,[6] was prepared for electrification in 1984.[7]

IncidentsEdit

 
Broom between Ngaurukehu and Turangerere in November 2010.

A train driver was killed 3 mi (4.8 km) south of Ngaurukehu in 1919, when the brakes failed and his train ran out of control down the hill.[15]

On 5 December 1923 a guard was injured when his van overturned after a goods train was reversed from the north siding, holding 46 wagons, into the south siding, which only had room for 41, the remainder falling off the end of the track. Some of the debris later fell onto a coach on an express train.[16] In 1929 Cabinet approved extension of the south backshunt for £400.[9]

Slips were a common problem. Between Hīhītahi and Ngaurukehu a slip derailed an engine in 1918,[17] part of a goods train in 1923[18] and a large boulder overturned a locomotive and derailed nine wagons in 1940.[19] Slips in the vicinity of the station delayed trains in 1912,[20] 1926,[21] 1929,[22] 1930,[23] 1935,[3] 1940.[24]

Scientific ReserveEdit

To the west of the railway[25] 215 acres (87 ha) was taken on 20 August 1911[26] for Maungakaretu (now Ngaurukehu) Scientific Reserve,[27] which protects several plants, including the rare Small-leaved Tree Daisy, Olearia gardneri. It is threatened by broom, Cytisus scoparius, and Khasia berry, Cotoneaster simonsii, which are common in the area.[28] The 1907 recommendation was for protection of a rather larger area.[29]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "LIMITED DELAYED. MANAWATU TIMES". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 20 November 1925. Retrieved 6 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ "NATURE NOTES. NEW ZEALAND HERALD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 10 June 1933. Retrieved 6 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ a b "SLIPS ON RAILWAYS. MANAWATU STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 19 August 1935. Retrieved 6 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ Scoble, Juliet. "Names & Opening & Closing Dates of Railway Stations in New Zealand 1863 to 2010" (PDF). Rail Heritage Trust of New Zealand.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ "Ngaurukehu, Manawatu-Wanganui". NZ Topo Map. Retrieved 6 October 2020.
  6. ^ a b c New Zealand Railway and Tramway Atlas (Fourth ed.). Quail Map Co. 1993. ISBN 0-900609-92-3.
  7. ^ a b "North Island Main Trunk Historic Area". www.heritage.org.nz. Retrieved 4 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ "Retrolens - Satellite view". retrolens.nz. Retrieved 6 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ a b c "Stations" (PDF). NZR Rolling Stock Lists. Retrieved 10 August 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ "WELLINGTON TO AUCKLAND. NEW ZEALAND MAIL". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 11 April 1906. Retrieved 4 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ "MAIN TRUNK LINE. MANAWATU STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 10 June 1908. Retrieved 4 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ "MANAWATU STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 6 July 1909. Retrieved 6 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. ^ "RAILWAY ACCIDENT. AUCKLAND STAR". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 6 December 1923. Retrieved 6 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ "FIGHTING FOR THEIR LIVES. AUCKLAND STAR". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 20 March 1918. Retrieved 6 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ "Main Trunk Smash. MANAWATU STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 15 May 1919. Retrieved 4 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  16. ^ "RAILWAY ACCIDENT. AUCKLAND STAR". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 6 December 1923. Retrieved 8 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  17. ^ "GENERAL TELEGRAMS. MANAWATU TIMES". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 11 December 1918. Retrieved 9 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. ^ "MAIN TRUNK EXPRESS DELAYED. MANAWATU TIMES". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 6 August 1923. Retrieved 9 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  19. ^ "RAILWAYS STATEMENT (BY THE MINISTER OF RAILWAYS, HON. R. SEMPLE). 1941". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 8 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  20. ^ "RANGITIKEI ADVOCATE AND MANAWATU ARGUS". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 23 September 1912. Retrieved 9 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  21. ^ "MANAWATU STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 13 May 1926. Retrieved 9 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  22. ^ "MAIN LINE SLIPS. AUCKLAND STAR". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 1 July 1929. Retrieved 9 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  23. ^ "SLIP ON RAILWAY. MANAWATU STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 24 November 1930. Retrieved 9 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  24. ^ "ABNORMAL RAINFALL. MANAWATU STANDARD". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 27 February 1940. Retrieved 9 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  25. ^ "Indigenous higher plants of Ngaurukehu Scientific Reserve" (PDF). nzpcn. August 1992.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  26. ^ "DEPARTMENT OF LANDS: SCENERY-PRESERVATION. REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31st MARCH, 1912". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 8 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  27. ^ Cleaver, Philip (May 2012). "TAKING OF MAORI LAND FOR PUBLIC WORKS IN THE TAIHAPE INQUIRY DISTRICT" (PDF). Waitangi Tribunal.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  28. ^ Ogle, Colin (June 2003). "Conservation of Olearia gardneri: report for the Rare, Small-leaved Tree Daisy Recovery Group" (PDF). DoC.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  29. ^ "DEPARTMENT OF LANDS: SCENERY PRESERVATION. REPORT Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 31 March 1907. Retrieved 25 October 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

External linksEdit

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