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List of tallest buildings in New York City

  (Redirected from New York City skyline)

Midtown Manhattan, looking north (uptown) from the Empire State Building
Midtown Manhattan in the distance. Photo taken at the original Two World Trade Center's observation deck, before its destruction.
Lower Manhattan, viewed from Brooklyn, with One World Trade Center at right
Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower Manhattan

New York City, the most populous city in the United States, is home to over 6,486 completed high rise buildings of at least 35 meters,[1] of which at least 113 completed are taller than 600 feet (183 m). The tallest building in New York is One World Trade Center, which rises 1,776 feet (541 m).[2][3] The 104-story skyscraper also stands as the tallest building in the United States, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, and the sixth-tallest building in the world.[3][4] The second-tallest building in the city is 432 Park Avenue, standing at 1,396 feet (426 m), and the third-tallest is the recently-topped-out 30 Hudson Yards. Not counting its antenna, the 4th-tallest is the 102-story Empire State Building in Midtown Manhattan, which was finished in 1931 and rises to 1,250 feet (381 m), increased to 1,454 feet (443 m) by its antenna.[5] It is the fifth-tallest building in the United States and the 37th-tallest building in the world.

The Empire State Building stood as the tallest building in the world from its completion until 1972, when the 110-story North Tower of the original World Trade Center was completed. At 1,368 feet (417 m), The World Trade Center briefly held the title as the world's tallest building until the completion of the 108-story Willis Tower (formerly known as the Sears Tower) in Chicago in 1974. The World Trade Center towers were destroyed by terrorist attacks in 2001, and the Empire State Building regained the title of tallest building in the City. It remained the tallest until April 2012, when the construction on One World Trade Center surpassed it. The fifth-tallest building in New York is the Bank of America Tower, which rises to 1,200 feet (366 m), including its spire.[6] If the Twin Towers were still standing today, they would be the third and fourth tallest buildings in the city, or second and third assuming the new buildings would not have been built. Only 432 Park Avenue is taller.

New York City skyscrapers are concentrated in Midtown and Lower Manhattan, although other neighborhoods of Manhattan and the boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx also have a few high-rises. As of May 2016, the entire city has 241 buildings that rise at least 500 feet (152 m) in height, including those under construction,[7] more than any other city in the United States.[8]

Since 2003, New York City has seen the completion of 24 buildings that rise at least 600 feet (183 m) in height, including the new One World Trade Center, which became the tallest building in the country when completed. 20 more are under construction.[3][4][9] One World Trade Center is part of the redevelopment of the World Trade Center, which also includes the 1,079-foot (329 m) 3 World Trade Center,[10] the 975-foot (297 m) 4 World Trade Center,[11] 7 World Trade Center and one under-construction building: the 1,350-foot (411 m) 2 World Trade Center.[12]

Overall, as of April 2016, there were 494 high-rise buildings under construction or proposed for construction in New York City.[13]

Contents

HistoryEdit

The history of skyscrapers in New York City began with the completion of the World Building in 1890; the structure rose to 348 feet (106 m).[14] Though not the city's first high-rise, it was the first building to surpass the 284-foot (87 m) spire of Trinity Church.[15] The World Building, which stood as the tallest in the city until 1899, was demolished in 1955 to allow for the construction of an expanded entrance to the Brooklyn Bridge.[15]

New York has played a prominent role in the development of the skyscraper; since 1890, eleven structures in the city having held the title of world's tallest building.[16] New York City went through a very early high-rise construction boom that lasted from the early 1910s through the early 1930s, during which 16 of the city's 82 tallest buildings were built—including the Woolworth Building, the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building, the Chrysler Building and the Empire State Building, each of which was the tallest in the world at the time of its completion, the last remaining so for forty years.[16]

A second skyscraper boom began in the early 1960s. Since then, the city has seen the completion of nearly 70 structures rising at least 600 feet (183 m) high, including the twin towers of the World Trade Center. One WTC also known as the North Tower, was the tallest building in the world from 1972 until 1973 and the tallest building in New York City until 2001.[17] The North Tower, as well as the other six buildings in the World Trade Center complex, were destroyed in the September 11 attacks of 2001.[18] One World Trade Center began construction in 2006 as the lead building of the new World Trade Center complex; upon its topping out in May 2013, the 1,776-foot (541 m) skyscraper surpassed the Willis Tower to become the tallest building in the United States.[3][19]



August 22, 2018 update of above panorama, to show new construction. Central Park Tower has risen impressively, on its way to 1550 feet, and just to the right of One57 which is at 157 W 57 St, can now be seen 111 West 57th Street, which will rise to 1428 feet. Manhattan West and Hudson Yards have also grown.

Tallest buildingsEdit

This list ranks completed and topped out New York City skyscrapers that stand at least 600 feet (183 m) tall, based on standard height measurement. This includes spires and architectural details but does not include antenna masts. An equal sign (=) following a rank indicates the same height between two or more buildings. An asterisk (*) indicates that the building is still under construction, but has been topped out. The "Year" column indicates the year in which a building was completed.

  Was the world's tallest building upon completion.
Rank Name Image Height
ft (m)
Floors Year Notes
1 One World Trade Center   1,776 (541) 104 2014 Tallest building in the Western Hemisphere by architectural height. Tallest building in New York City and the United States. 6th-tallest building in the world. Roof height is 1,368 feet (417 m), the same as the original World Trade Center. Footprint of the building is 200 by 200 feet (61 by 61 m), the same as the Twin Towers.
2 432 Park Avenue   1,396 (426) 96 2015 Second tallest building in NYC, tallest residential building in the world; 22nd-tallest building in the world; 3rd-tallest building in the United States.[20][21]
3 30 Hudson Yards*   1,268 (386.6)[22] 73 2019 Topped out in July of 2018.[23][24]
4 Empire State Building   1,250 (381) 103 1931 39th-tallest building in the world, 5th-tallest in the United States; first building in the world to contain over 100 floors. Built in just 14 months during the Great Depression, it was the world's tallest building from its completion in 1931 until the World Trade Center was completed in 1972, and was again New York City's tallest building after the World Trade Center was destroyed in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, until 2013, when it was surpassed by One World Trade Center.[5][25]
5 Bank of America Tower   1,200 (366) 54 2009 45th-tallest building in the world, 6th-tallest in the United States; first skyscraper to receive a Platinum LEED certification.[6][26] Roof height is 953.5 feet (290.6 m).
6 3 World Trade Center   1,079 (329) 80 2018 Topped out in June 2016.[27] Officially opened June 11, 2018. Third tallest building in the World Trade Center complex.[28]
7 53W53*   1,050 (320)[29] 87 2018 Topped out in April of 2018.[30]
8 Chrysler Building   1,046 (319) 77 1930 Tied for 13th-tallest in the United States; first building in the world to rise higher than 1,000 feet (305 m); stood as the tallest building in the world from 1930 until 1931 when it was surpassed by the Empire State Building; tallest steel-framed brick building in the world. At its completion overtook the Eiffel Tower as the world's tallest man-made structure.

Was the tallest building in New York City before being surpassed by the Empire State Building.[31][32]

9 The New York Times Building   1,046 (319) 52 2007 Tied for 13th-tallest in the United States. Also known as the Times Tower. The first high-rise building in the United States to have a ceramic sunscreen curtain wall.[33][34]
10 35 Hudson Yards*   1,009 (308) 79 2018 Topped out in June of 2018.[35][36]
11 One57   1,004 (306) 75 2014 Tallest mixed-use (residential and hotel) skyscraper in the city, 107th-tallest building in the world[37][38] Tallest mid-block building in the city.[citation needed]
12 1 Manhattan West*   995 (303) 67 2019 Topped out in August 2018.[39][40]
13 4 World Trade Center   978 (298) 74 2013 Also known as 150 Greenwich Street, part of the rebuilding of the World Trade Center.[41]
14 220 Central Park South*   953 (290) 69 2018 Topped out in 2017.[42]
15 70 Pine Street   952 (290) 66 1932 25th-tallest building in the United States; formerly known as the American International Building and the Cities Service Building[43][44] 70 Pine is being transformed into a residential skyscraper with 644 rental residences, 132 hotel rooms and 35,000 square feet of retail space.[45] It stood as the tallest building in Lower Manhattan from the time of its completion until the construction of the original World Trade Center towers in the 1970s, then regained that status after 9/11, holding it until the construction of the new One World Trade Center building.
16 30 Park Place   937 (286) 82 2016 Four Season Private Residences and Hotel. Topped out in March 2015.[46][47]
17 40 Wall Street   927 (283) 70 1930 30th-tallest in the United States; was world's tallest building for less than two months in 1930; formerly known as the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building; currently known as the Trump Building, a more permanent name is 40 Wall Street

Was the Tallest building in New York City before being surpassed by the Chrysler Building.[48][49] Was the tallest mid-block building in the city from 1930 until the completion of One57 in 2014.

18 Citigroup Center   915 (279) 59 1977 Formerly Citicorp Center and now known as 601 Lexington Avenue[50][51]
19 15 Hudson Yards*   912 (278) 70 2018 Topped out in February 2018.[52]
20 10 Hudson Yards   878 (268) 52 2016 Topped out in October 2015. Part of 30 Hudson yards project.[53][54]
21 8 Spruce Street   870 (265) 76 2011 Also known as Beekman Tower and New York by Gehry
22 Trump World Tower   861 (262) 72 2001 Fourth-tallest all-residential building in the city; tallest residential building in the world from 2000 until 2003.[55][56]
23 30 Rockefeller Plaza   850 (260) 70 1933 Also known as the Comcast Building, formerly known as the GE Building, and the RCA Building before that; colloquially referred to as "30 Rock" for its address, houses NBC Studios and the Top of the Rock observation deck.
24 One Manhattan Square*   847 (258) 72 2019 Topped out in September 2017.[57] Also known as 252 South Street or 227 Cherry Street.[58]
25 56 Leonard Street   821 (250) 57 2016 The tallest structure in Tribeca.[59][60][61]
26 CitySpire Center   814 (248) 75 1987 [62][63][64]
27 28 Liberty Street   813 (248) 60 1961 Known until sale in 2015 as One Chase Manhattan Plaza[65][66]
28 4 Times Square   809 (247) 48 1999 Height is 809 feet to mast structure. Roof height is 701 feet. Antenna height is 1118 feet. Formerly known as the Condé Nast Building[67][68]
29 MetLife Building   808 (246) 59 1963 Formerly known as the Pan Am Building[69][70]
30 731 Lexington Avenue   806 (246) 54 2005 It houses the headquarters of Bloomberg L.P. and as a result, is sometimes referred to informally as Bloomberg Tower.[71][72]
31 138 East 50th* 803 (245) 64 2019 Topped out in November 2017.[73][74]
32 111 Murray Street   792 (241) 58 2018 Completed in 2018.[75]
33 Woolworth Building   792 (241) 57 1913 Tallest building in the world from 1913 until 1930. Was the tallest building in New York City before being surpassed by 40 Wall Street.[76][77]
34 520 Park Avenue*   781 (238) 54 2018 Topped out in April 2017.[78][79]
35= One Worldwide Plaza   778 (237) 50 1989 Commercial office tower on Eighth Avenue[80][81]
35= 50 West Street   778 (237) 63 2017 Topped out in October 2015.[82][83][84]
37 55 Hudson Yards*   778 (238) 51 2018 Topped out in April 2017.[85][86][87][88]
38 Madison Square Park Tower   777 (237) 64 2017 Topped out in May 2016.[89][90]
39 19 Dutch Street*   758 (231) 63 2018 Also called 118 Fulton Street.[91][92] Topped out in May 2016.[93]
40 Carnegie Hall Tower   757 (231) 60 1991 [94][95]
41 383 Madison Avenue   755 (230) 47 2001 Formerly known as Bear Stearns World Headquarters[96][97]
42 1717 Broadway   754 (230) 68 2013 It houses the Courtyard & Residence Inn Manhattan/Central Park hotel. Tallest hotel in the western hemisphere.[98][99][100]
43 AXA Equitable Center   752 (229) 54 1986 Formerly known as the Equitable Building and Equitable Center West[101][102]
44= One Penn Plaza   750 (229) 57 1972 [103][104]
44= 1251 Avenue of the Americas   750 (229) 54 1971 Formerly known as the Exxon Building.[105][106]
46= Time Warner Center South Tower   750 (228) 55 2004 [107][108]
46= Time Warner Center North Tower   750 (228) 55 2004 [108][109]
46= 200 West Street   750 (228) 44 2010 Also known as Goldman Sachs World Headquarters.[110][111]
49= 60 Wall Street   745 (227) 55 1989 Also known as Deutsche Bank Building[112][113]
49= One Astor Plaza   745 (227) 54 1972 [114][115]
51= 7 World Trade Center   743 (226) 52 2006 [116][117]
51= One Liberty Plaza   743 (226) 54 1973 Formerly known as the U.S. Steel Building[118][119]
53 20 Exchange Place   741 (226) 57 1931 Formerly known as the City Bank-Farmers Trust Building[120][121]
54 200 Vesey Street   739 (225) 51 1986 Formerly known as Three World Financial Center and American Express Tower[122][123]
55 ARO* 738 (225) 62 2018 Topped out in June 2017.[124] Also known as 242 West 53rd Street and Roseland Tower.[125]
56 1540 Broadway   733 (223) 42 1990 Also known as Bertelsmann Building.[126][127]
57 3 Manhattan West   730 (222) 62 2017 Topped out in April 2016.[128][129]
58 Times Square Tower   726 (221) 47 2004 [130][131]
59 Metropolitan Tower   716 (218) 77 1987 [132][133]
60 252 East 57th Street   715 (218) 65 2017 Topped out in October 2015.[134] Completed in 2017.
61 100 East 53rd Street   711 (217) 63 2017 Also known as 100 East 53rd Street. Topped out in January 2016.[135][136]
62 270 Park Avenue   707 (215) 52 1961 Also known as JPMorgan Chase Tower and formerly the Union Carbide Building.[137][138]In 2018, JPMorgan announced they would demolish the current building on site to make way for a newer building that will be 500 feet (150 m) taller than the existing building. Demolition is expected to begin in early 2019, and the new building will be completed in 2024.[139]
63 General Motors Building   705 (215) 50 1968 [140][141]
64 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower   700 (213) 50 1909 Tallest building in the world from 1909 until 1913

Was the tallest building in New York City before being surpassed by the Woolworth Building.[142][143]

65 500 Fifth Avenue   697 (212) 60 1931 [144][145]
66 Americas Tower   691 (211) 50 1992 [146][147]
67 Solow Building   689 (210) 49 1974 [148][149]
67 Marine Midland Building   688 (210) 52 1967 Also known as HSBC Bank Building[150][151]
69= 55 Water Street   687 (209) 53 1972 [152][153]
69= 277 Park Avenue   687 (209) 50 1962 [154][155]
69= 5 Beekman   687 (209) 47 2015 Also known as The Beekman Hotel & Residences.[156]
72 Morgan Stanley Building   685 (209) 42 1989 Also known as 1585 Broadway. It houses the Morgan Stanley World Headquarters[157][158]
73 Random House Tower   684 (208) 52 2003 [159][160]
74 Four Seasons Hotel New York   682 (208) 52 1993 Tallest all-hotel building in the city[161][162]
75 Sky   676 (206) 61 2015 Also known as 605 West 42nd Street and Atelier II. Largest single tower residence in New York City.[163] Sky comprises 1,175 luxury units and includes more than 70,000 sq ft of amenity space.[164]
76 1221 Avenue of the Americas   674 (205) 51 1972 Formerly known as the McGraw-Hill Building.[165][166]
77= Lincoln Building   673 (205) 55 1930 Also known as One Grand Central Place.[167][168]
77= One Court Square   673 (205) 50 1990 Tallest building in New York City outside of Manhattan; tallest building on Long Island and in the Borough of Queens; formerly known as the Citigroup Building[169][170]
77= Barclay Tower   673 (205) 56 2007 [171][172]
80= Paramount Plaza   670 (204) 48 1971 Formerly the Uris Building.[173][174]
80= 161 Maiden Lane 670 (204) 60 2019 Also known as One Seaport. Topped out in August 2018.[175][176][177]
82 Trump Tower   664 (202) 58 1983 [178][179]
83 277 Fifth Avenue* 663 (202) 52 2018 It topped out in March 2018.[180]
84 1 Wall Street   654 (199) 50 1931 It was formerly called Bank of New York Building and Irving Trust Building.[181][182]
85= Silver Towers I   653 (199) 60 2009 Also known as River Place.[183][184]
85= Silver Towers II   653 (199) 60 2009 Also known as River Place.[185][186]
85= 599 Lexington Avenue   653 (199) 50 1986 [187][188]
88 712 Fifth Avenue   650 (198) 52 1990 [189][190]
89 Chanin Building   649 (198) 56 1929 [191][192]
90 245 Park Avenue   648 (197) 44 1966 [193][194]
91= 550 Madison Avenue   647 (197) 37 1984 Formerly known as the Sony Building and AT&T Building.[195][196]
91= Tower 28   647 (197) 58 2016 Topped out in April 2016. Tallest residential building of Queens.[197][198]
93 225 Liberty Street   645 (197) 44 1987 Formerly called Two World Financial Center.[199][200]
94 1095 Avenue of the Americas   644 (196) 43 1974 Also known as Verizon World Headquarters[201][202]
95 570 Lexington Avenue   643 (196) 50 1931 Also known as the General Electric Building[203][204]
96 1 New York Plaza   640 (195) 50 1969 [205][206]
97 MiMA   638 (194) 55 2011 [207][208]
98 One Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza   637 (194) 49 1972 [209][210]
99 345 Park Avenue   634 (193) 44 1969 [211][212]
100= Mercantile Building   632 (193) 48 1929 Also known as 10 East 40th Street[213][214]
100= The Langham, New York   632 (193) 57 2010 Also known as 400 Fifth Avenue.[215][216]
102= W New York Downtown Hotel and Residences   630 (192) 57 2010 [217]
102= W. R. Grace Building   630 (192) 50 1971 [218][219]
102= Home Insurance Plaza   630 (192) 45 1966 [220][221]
102= 101 Park Avenue   629 (192) 49 1982 [222][223]
106= Central Park Place   628 (191) 56 1988 [224][225]
106= 888 7th Avenue   628 (191) 46 1971 [226][227]
108= Waldorf Astoria New York   625 (191) 47 1931 [228][229]
108= 1345 Avenue of the Americas   625 (191) 50 1969 [230][231]
110 AVA DoBro   624 (190) 58 2015 Also called Avalon Willoughby Square and 100 Willoughby.[232]
111 Trump Palace Condominiums   623 (190) 54 1991 [233][234]
112 One Madison   621 (188) 51 2010 [235][236]
113 Olympic Tower   620 (189) 51 1976 [237][238]
114 425 Fifth Avenue   618 (188) 55 2003 [239][240]
115= 919 Third Avenue   615 (187) 47 1971 [241][242]
115= New York Life Building   615 (187) 40 1928 [243][244]
115= 750 7th Avenue   615 (187) 40 1989 [245][246]
115= The Epic   615 (187) 58 2007 [247][248]
115= Tower 49   615 (187) 45 1985 [249][250]
120 Eventi   614 (187) 54 2010 [251]
121 555 10th Avenue   612 (186) 53 2016 Topped out in September 2015.[252][253]
122 Credit Lyonnais Building   609 (186) 45 1964 [254][255]
123 Baccarat Hotel and Residences   605 (185) 48 2014 [256]
124 The Orion   604 (184) 60 2006 [257][258]
125 590 Madison Avenue   603 (184) 42 1983 Also known as the IBM Building[259][260]
126 The Hub   602 (183) 52 2016 Also known as 333 Schermerhorn Street. Tallest building in Brooklyn.
Topped out on December 16, 2015.[261][262][263][264]
127 250 West 55th Street   602 (183) 39 2013 [265]
128 Eleven Times Square   601 (183) 40 2010 Also known as Times Square Plaza.[266][267]
129 1166 Avenue of the Americas   600 (183) 44 1974 [268]

Tallest buildings by pinnacle heightEdit

This lists ranks buildings in New York City based on pinnacle height measurement, which includes antenna masts. Standard architectural height measurement, which excludes non-architectural antennas in building height, is included for comparative purposes. An equal sign (=) following a rank indicates the same height between two or more buildings. The "Year" column indicates the year in which a building was completed.

 
Tallest buildings in NYC, by pinnacle height, including all masts, antennae, poles, etc., whether architectural or not
Pinn.
Rank
Std.
Rank
Name Pinnacle
height
ft (m)
Standard
height
ft (m)
Floors
Year
Sources
1 1 One World Trade Center 1,792 (546) 1,776 (541) 104 2014 [4][269]
2 3 Empire State Building 1,454 (443) 1,250 (381) 102 1931 [270][271][272]
3 2 432 Park Avenue 1,396 (426) 1,396 (426) 96 2015 [20][21]
4 4 30 Hudson Yards 1,296 (392) 1,296 (392) 73 2018 [273]
5 5 Bank of America Tower 1,200 (366) 1,200 (366) 55 2009 [6][26]
6 18 Condé Nast Building 1,118 (341) 809 (247) 48 1999 [67][68]
7 6 53W53 1,050 (320) 1,050 (320) ?? 2018 ref
8= 7= Chrysler Building 1,046 (319) 1,046 (319) 77 1931 [31][32]
8= 7= New York Times Building 1,046 (319) 1,046 (319) 52 2007 [33][34]
10 9 One57 1,005 (306) 1,005 (306) 75 2014 [37][38]
11 10 4 World Trade Center 977 (298) 977 (298) 72 2013 [11][41]
12 11 70 Pine Street 952 (290) 952 (290) 66 1932 [43][44]

Tallest buildings in each boroughEdit

This lists the tallest building in each borough of New York City based on standard height measurement. The "Year" column indicates the year in which a building was completed.

Borough Name Height
ft (m)
Floors
Year
Source
Bronx Harlem River Park Towers I & II 404 (123) 44 1975 [274][275]
Brooklyn The Hub 610 (190) 52 2016 [264]
Manhattan One World Trade Center 1,776 (541) 104 2014 [269]
Queens One Court Square 658 (201) 50 1990 [169]
Staten Island Church at Mount Loretto 225 (69) 1 1894 [276][277]

Tallest under construction or proposedEdit

Under constructionEdit

This lists buildings that are currently under construction in New York City and are expected to rise to a height of at least 600 feet (183 m). Buildings under construction that have already been topped out are also included, as are those whose construction has been suspended. For buildings whose heights have not yet been released by their developers, this table uses a floor count of 50 stories as the cutoff.

Name Image Height*
ft (m)
Floors Year (est.)
Central Park Tower   1,550 (472) 95 [278] 2020 At 1,550 feet, upon completion it will have the highest roof height of any building in the United States. The building will also be the tallest residential building in the world both by roof height and architectural height. Construction was delayed in 2015 and resumed in 2017.[279][280]
111 West 57th Street   1,428 (435) 82 2019[281] Construction was stalled in July 2017, after reaching 20 stories, but as of August it has resumed. Will be the world's most slender skyscraper upon completion.[282]
One Vanderbilt 1,401 (427) 57 2021 As of August 2016, excavation is underway.[283] Would become one of the tallest buildings in midtown east as part of the Vanderbilt Corridor rezoning.[284]
45 Broad Street 1,127 (367) 66 2021 Set to become the tallest residential building downtown.[285][286]
9 DeKalb Avenue   1,066 (325) 73 2020 Upon completion, 9 DeKalb Avenue will become New York City’s tallest building outside of Manhattan, and give Brooklyn its first supertall skyscraper.[287][288]
50 Hudson Yards 1,011 (306) 58 2022 [289]
The Spiral 1,031 (312) 65 2021 34th Street and 10th avenue, at the beginning of the High Line. Almost every floor will have an its own outdoor terrace.[290]
3 Hudson Boulevard 940 (286.5) 53 2021 Formerly known as GiraSole [291]
Two Manhattan West 935 (285) 56 2022 [292]
125 Greenwich Street 912 (278) 72 2020 [293]
425 Park Avenue   860 (262) 44 2019 [294][295]
126 Madison Avenue 805 (245) 56 2021 [296]
Court Square City View Tower 762 (232) 68 2021 [297]
50 West 66th Street 755 (230) 69 2020 Would become the tallest building in the Upper West Side upon completion.[298]
Wall Street Tower 755 (230) 61 2020 Also known as 130 William Street.[299]
23 Park Row 702 (214) 54 2019 [300]
Brooklyn Point 696 (212) 57 2021 Also known as City Point Tower III.[301]
200 Amsterdam 669 (204) 51 2019 Would become the 2nd tallest building in the Upper West Side upon completion after 50 West 66th Street.[302]
45 Park Place 667 (203) 43 2019 Demolition of the site’s buildings is nearly complete, and ground breaking is expected before 2016.[303]
11 Hoyt Street 626 (191) 51 2020 Construction began in 2018.[304]

* Table entries with dashes (—) indicate that information regarding expected building heights or dates of completion has not yet been released.

ProposedEdit

This table lists buildings that are proposed for construction in New York City and are expected to rise at least 600 feet (183 m) in height. For buildings whose heights have not yet been released by their developers, this table uses a floor count of 50 stories as the cutoff.

Name Height*
ft (m)
Floors Year* Notes
80 South Street 1,436 (438) 113 [305]
15 Penn Plaza 1,216 (371) 68 As of 2017, Vornado is still seeking an anchor tenant to justify construction.[306]
270 Park Avenue (reconstruction) ~1200 (368) 70+ 2022-24 JPMorgan Chase plans to demolish & replace its headquarters[307]
262 Fifth Avenue 1,001 (304) 54 [308]
335 Madison Avenue 1,000+ (305+) [309]
SNCI Tower 950 (280) 57
520 Fifth Avenue 920 (280) 71 There is a possibility that a crown element could bump the project above the 1000 ft. mark.[310]
426 East 58th Street 900+ (274+) Also known as Sutton Place Tower.[311]
247 Cherry 900 (274) 77 SHoP Architects building being designed by JDS Development Group. Initial plans revealed in April 2016.[312]
80 Flatbush 840 (257) 74 [313]
West 30th Street 800 (244) 64 [314]
75 Nassau Street 800 (244) [315]
260 South Street Tower I 798 (243) 69 2021 [316]
260 South Street Tower II 728 (222) 62 2021 [316]
5 World Trade Center 743 (226) 42 Considered to be a stale proposal; also known as 130 Liberty Street.[317][318]
259 Clinton Street 730 (223) 2021 [319]
470 11th Avenue 720 (220) 52 2017 [320]
12 East 37th Street 700 (213) 65 2017 [321]

* Table entries with dashes (—) indicate that information regarding building heights or dates of completion has not yet been released.

 
A panoramic view of Midtown Manhattan during midday, taken from the Empire State Building

Tallest destroyedEdit

This table lists buildings in New York City that were destroyed or demolished and at one time stood at least 500 feet (152 m) in height.

Name Image Height
ft (m)
Floors Completed
in
Destroyed
in
Notes
1 World Trade Center (original)   1,368 (417) 110 1972 2001 Destroyed in the September 11, 2001, attacks; stood as the tallest building in the world from 1972 until 1974[17][322]
2 World Trade Center (original)   1,362 (415) 110 1973 2001 Destroyed in the September 11 attacks[323][324]
Singer Building   612 (187) 47 1908 1968 Demolished to make room for One Liberty Plaza; stood as tallest building in the world from 1908 until 1909[325][326]
7 World Trade Center (original)   570 (174) 47 1987 2001 Destroyed in the September 11 attacks[327][328]
Deutsche Bank Building   517 (157.6) 39 1974 2011 Deconstructed due to damage sustained in the September 11 attacks[329][330]

Timeline of tallest buildingsEdit

This lists buildings that once held the title of tallest building in New York City. Both Trinity Church and the Empire State Building have held the title twice, the latter following the destruction of the World Trade Center in the September 11 attacks. The Empire State Building was surpassed by One World Trade Center in 2012.

  Was also the world's tallest building during at least some of its period as New York City's tallest building[16]
Name Image Street address Years as
tallest
Height
ft (m)
Floors Notes
Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church   Fort Amsterdam 1643–1846 Unknown 1 Demolished[331]
Trinity Church   06.079 Broadway 1846–1853 279 (85) 1 [332]
Latting Observatory
(1853–1856)
  06.042nd Street and Fifth Avenue 1853–1854 315 (96) 3 Height reduced by 75 feet (23 m) in 1854;
burned down in 1856[333]
Trinity Church   06.079 Broadway 1854–1890 279 (85) 1 [332]
World Building[A]
(1890–1955)
  12.0Frankfort Street 1890–1894 348 (106) 20[B] Tied for tallest building in the city from 1894 to 1899;
demolished in 1955[14]
Manhattan Life Insurance Building
(1894–1963/64)[A]
  05.064–70 Broadway 1894–1899 348 (106) 18 Tied for tallest building in the city from 1894 to 1899;
demolished in 1963-64[334]
Park Row Building   03.013–21 Park Row 1899–1908 391 (119) 30 [335]
Singer Building
(1908–1968)
  07.0149 Broadway 1908–1909 612 (187) 47 Demolished in 1968[336]
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower   01.01 Madison Avenue 1909–1913 700 (213) 50 [143]
Woolworth Building   08.0233 Broadway 1913–1930 792 (241) 57 [77]
Bank of Manhattan Trust Building[C]   04.040 Wall Street 1930 927 (283) 70 [49]
Chrysler Building   11.0405 Lexington Avenue 1930–1931 1,046 (319) 77 [32]
Empire State Building   09.0350 Fifth Avenue 1931–1972 1,250 (381) 102 [270]
1 World Trade Center
(1972–2001)
  01.01 World Trade Center 1972–2001 1,368 (417) 110 Destroyed in the September 11, 2001, attacks[322]
Empire State Building   09.0350 Fifth Avenue 2001–2013 1,250 (381) 102 [270]
One World Trade Center   09.01 World Trade Center 2013–present 1,776 (541) 104 [269]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

A. ^ a b The Manhattan Life Insurance Building, completed in 1894, tied the height of the World Building. The city therefore had two tallest buildings for a period of five years, until the Park Row Building was completed in 1899.
B. ^ The floor count of the World Building has been disputed. Upon construction, the building was said to contain up to 26 floors, but in recent years the building has been said to contain as few as 16 floors.[15]
C. ^ This building was constructed as the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building, but is now more commonly known as 40 Wall Street and officially known as the Trump Building.

ReferencesEdit

Citations

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External linksEdit