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New Junk Aesthetic

New Junk Aesthetic is the fifth studio album by American metalcore band Every Time I Die. It was released on September 15, 2009. It was the band's first album to be released by their new record label, Epitaph Records. The album artwork was created by guitarist Jordan Buckley.

New Junk Aesthetic
EveryTimeIDIeNewJunkAesthetic.jpg
Studio album by Every Time I Die
Released September 15, 2009
Recorded April and June 2009
Studio Omen Room Studios, Garden Grove, California
Castle Oaks, Calabasas, California
Genre
Length 37:30
Label Epitaph
Producer Steve Evetts
Every Time I Die chronology
The Big Dirty
(2007)The Big Dirty2007
New Junk Aesthetic
(2009)
Ex Lives
(2012)Ex Lives2012

Contents

BackgroundEdit

In June 2008, the band announced that Josh Newton of From Autumn to Ashes had joined them as the permanent bassist.[1] A month later, it was announced that the band were unsigned.[2] Vocalist Keith Buckley said that The Big Dirty was "the last thing we had to deliver for Ferret so we are in limbo".[3] He mentioned that the band were in the process of talking with labels, "I think people will be very pleased to know that it looks like we will not be signing with a major."[3] The band were planning to write their next album at the end of the year.[3] On January 2, it was reported that the band had signed to independent label Epitaph Records.[4] On January 12, the band began writing their next album.[5]

On February 11, the band's signing with Epitaph Records was formally announced. Buckley said that "To be given the opportunity to start anew after existing for over ten years in an environment that has chewed up and spit out most bands in a quarter of that time is nothing short of a miracle."[6] He said that the band's first release for the label would be recorded in the spring with producer Steve Evetts and "thus far is proving to capture the excitement of our new lease on life and the aggressive energy we are notorious for."[6] In an interview in February, Buckley mentioned that the band had written two songs. Despite being a band for ten years, he said that to still have "fresh ideas is a little relieving."[7]

Recording and compositionEdit

The band began recording New Junk Aesthetic on April 1[5] with producer Steve Evetts. Recording took place at Castle Oaks in Calabasas, California. Evetts engineered and mixed the recordings. Additional engineering, as well as editing, was performed by Allan Hessler, with assistance by Matthew Mesiano.[8] In May, the band supported Gallows on their tour of the UK.[9] During the tour, Buckley said the album was not done and that there were parts that needed to be finished following the tour's conclusion. Buckley was "surprised" with how the album was shaping up, "I did not know that we had it in us to be this fast and heavy anymore. ... [With] a lot of bands ... you can pinpoint the exact time ... [they] started going through the motions. We are not going through the motions on this record at all, it is a legit punk record."[10]

On June 7, the band said they were back in the studio,[11] recording at Omen Room Studios in Garden Grove, California.[8] Here, the band recorded Newton's bass parts.[11] On June 11, the band said that Matt Caughthran of the Bronx had stopped by the studio,[12] contributing vocals to "The Sweet Life".[13] On June 16, Buckley announced that the recording process for New Junk Aesthetic was finished.[14] On June 27, Pete Wentz of Fall Out Boy posted that he had added vocals[15] to "After One Quarter of a Revolution". In addition, Greg Puciato of the Dillinger Escape Plan added vocals to "The Marvelous Slut".[13] Alan Douches mastered the recordings at West West Side Music.[8] The album's sound has been described as hardcore punk,[16][17] metalcore[16] and Southern rock.[16][17]

ReleaseEdit

On June 28, 2009, the band performed at S.C.E.N.E. Music Festival in Canada.[18] On June 29, drummer Mike Novak announced that he had left the band, citing "personal conflicts" and mentioning he was getting himself "out of an uncomfortable, unhealthy situation".[19] The following day, the band said "For the past year it has felt like we were playing with a drum machine or a pre recorded backing track. He completely shut off communication with us ... he simply was not a part of us anymore mentally or emotionally."[20] On July 8, "The Marvelous Slut" was released as a free download. On July 13, New Junk Aesthetic was announced for release in September. In addition, the album's track listing and artwork was revealed.[21] The artwork was created by guitarist Jordan Buckley, to which Keith called it "a superb job".[14] Blabbermouth.net said the artwork features "a mythological god covering his eyes with see-through hands".[22] Later in the month, the band filmed a music video for "Wanderlust".[23] On August 17, "Wanderlust" was posted on the group's Myspace profile.[24] On August 22, the band performed a show with new drummer Ryan Leger of Dead and Divine.[23] On August 25, the music video for "Wanderlust" was released, directed by Chris Sims.[25] According to Chart Attack, the video features Buckley "stuck in one gigantic hall with many doors, and every one he walks through features some kind of weird, sketched world of art from New Junk Aesthetic on the other side."[26] New Junk Aesthetic was released on September 15 through Epitaph Records.[21] The album included 11 tracks, while the deluxe edition added two more.[14]

In September and October, the band went on a US tour with Bring Me the Horizon, with support from Oh, Sleeper and Architects.[27] In November and December, the band went on the Taste of Chaos tour in the UK and Europe, playing alongside Killswitch Engage, In Flames, Maylene and the Sons of Disaster and Dead by April.[28] In January 2010, the band went on the Boys of Summer tour in Australia with 50 Lions, Trap Them and Mary Jane Kelly.[29] On March 8, the band released a music video for "After One Quarter of a Revolution".[30] In March and April, the band went on a US tour alongside Four Year Strong, Polar Bear Club and Trapped Under Ice.[31] In May, the band went on a tour of the US with Norma Jean and Cancer Bats.[32] In July and August, the band performed on Warped Tour.[33] In September and October, the band went on the Hell on Earth tour in Europe alongside Terror, All Shall Perish, Down to Nothing and Thick as Blood.[34] In April 2011, the band appeared at Groezrock.[35] The following month, the band headlined Bled Fest.[36] In September and October, the band headlined the Counter Revolution tour in Australia with support from the Acacia Strain and the Word Alive.[37] On October 13, it was announced that Newton left the band to pursue a career. He was replaced by Stephen Micciche, who was originally the band's third bassist.[38] Shortly afterwards, the band supported GWAR on their tour of the US, which lasted until the end of November.[39]

ReceptionEdit

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AbsolutePunk 91% [40]
AllMusic       [41]
Blare       [42]
Chart Attack       [43]
Hearwax 7.7/10 [44]
Punknews.org       [13]
Rock Sound 9/10 [17]
Sputnikmusic       [45]
Thrash Hits 5/6 [46]
Ultimate Guitar 9/10 [47]

The album has received mostly positive reviews. AbsolutePunk reviewer Drew Beringer gave an overall verdict of 91%, saying "The truth is Every Time I Die has never sounded better, and New Junk Aesthetic, musically speaking, should be classified as a weapon of mass destruction" as well as praising the album's guitar work."[40] Another positive review came from Sputnikmusic staff reviewer Adam Thomas, commenting on how it is a fusion of all the band's previous albums, and "To put it simply, there's something for everyone."[45] AllMusic gave the album three and a half stars and writes "Every Time I Die sounds energized and passionate, delivering its blend of old and new sounds with a directness that gives the ferocious music an unusually broad appeal."[41]

The album debuted at number 46 on the US Billboard 200 chart, selling an estimated 12,000 copies in its first week.[48]

Track listingEdit

All songs written and performed by Every Time I Die.[8]

No. Title Length
1. "Roman Holiday" 3:00
2. "The Marvelous Slut" (featuring Greg Puciato of the Dillinger Escape Plan) 1:43
3. "Who Invited the Russian Soldier?" 2:45
4. "Wanderlust" 4:10
5. "For the Record" 2:59
6. "White Smoke" 3:00
7. "Turtles All the Way Down" 2:42
8. "Organ Grinder" 4:07
9. "Host Disorder" 2:29
10. "After One Quarter of a Revolution" (featuring Pete Wentz of Fall Out Boy) 2:04
11. "The Sweet Life" (featuring Matt Caughthran of the Bronx) 2:52

Deluxe edition bonus tracks

No. Title Length
12. "Buffalo 666" 2:40
13. "Goddamn Kids These Days" 3:01

PersonnelEdit

Personnel per booklet,[8] except where noted.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Rock Sound (June 16, 2008). "ETID Check In". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  2. ^ "Every Time I Die free agents". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. July 15, 2008. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c Rock Sound. "ETID Searching For New Label". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Archived from the original on August 1, 2008. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  4. ^ Rock Sound (January 2, 2009). "Every Time I Die Sign With Epitaph". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Rock Sound (January 14, 2009). "Every Time I Die Start Writing". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b "Every Time I Die officially sign to Epitaph". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. February 11, 2009. Retrieved August 1, 2017. 
  7. ^ Hutton, Sarah (February 13, 2009). "Every Time I Die". FasterLouder. Junkee Media. Retrieved July 13, 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c d e New Junk Aesthetic (Booklet). Every Time I Die. Epitaph Records. 2009. 7042-2. 
  9. ^ Rock Sound (February 8, 2009). "Every Time I Die On Album And Aisles". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  10. ^ Rock Sound (May 6, 2009). "Every Time I Die Talk About Album Five". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  11. ^ a b Paul, Aubin (June 7, 2009). "Studio update from Every Time I Die". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  12. ^ Paul, Aubin (June 11, 2009). "Matt Caughthran to guest on Every Time I Die album". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f Shultz, Brian (October 13, 2009). "Every Time I Die - New Junk Aesthetic". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved December 28, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b c Rock Sound (June 16, 2009). "Every Time I Die Finish New Record". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  15. ^ Chart Attack (June 30, 2009). "Wentz On Every Time I Die Album". Chart Attack. Channel Zero. Retrieved July 12, 2017. 
  16. ^ a b c Pereira, Sergio (January 3, 2010). "Music review". MusicReview. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  17. ^ a b c Newbound, Tim (September 15, 2009). "Every Time I Die - 'New Junk Aesthetic'". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  18. ^ "Every Time I Die, Cancer Bats Confirmed For Ontario's S.C.E.N.E. Music Festival". Blabbermouth.net. April 27, 2009. Retrieved July 14, 2017. 
  19. ^ Paul, Aubin (June 29, 2009). "Every Time I Die drummer quits". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  20. ^ Paul, Aubin (June 30, 2009). "Every Time I Die respond to drummer departure". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  21. ^ a b Paul, Aubin (July 7, 2009). "Every Time I Die detail "New Junk Aesthetic"". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  22. ^ "EVERY TIME I DIE: More 'New Junk Aesthetic' Details Revealed". Blabbermouth.net. July 18, 2009. Retrieved July 12, 2017. 
  23. ^ a b "EVERY TIME I DIE Taps Former DEAD AND DIVINE Drummer". Blabbermouth.net. August 23, 2009. Retrieved July 13, 2017. 
  24. ^ Yancey, Bryne (August 17, 2009). "Every Time I Die: "Wanderlust"". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  25. ^ "EVERY TIME I DIE: 'Wanderlust' Video Released". Blabbermouth.net. August 25, 2009. Retrieved July 12, 2017. 
  26. ^ Chart Attack (August 26, 2009). "Every Time I Die — "Wanderlust"". Chart Attack. Channel Zero. Retrieved July 12, 2017. 
  27. ^ Paul, Aubin (July 7, 2009). "Every Time I Die / Bring Me the Horizon / Oh, Sleeper / Architects". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  28. ^ Paul, Aubin (October 5, 2009). "In Flames / Killswitch Engage / Every Time I Die / Maylene and the sons of Disaster / Dead By April". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  29. ^ Mann, Tom (October 7, 2009). "Boys Of Summer Tour 2010". FasterLouder. Junkee Media. Retrieved July 12, 2017. 
  30. ^ Rock Sound (March 8, 2010). "Every Time I Die - After One Quarter Of A Revolution". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  31. ^ Paul, Aubin (January 25, 2010). "Every Time I Die / Four Year Strong / Polar Bear Club / Trapped Under Ice". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  32. ^ "CANCER BATS To Support EVERY TIME I DIE On U.S. Tour". Blabbermouth.net. April 5, 2010. Retrieved July 13, 2017. 
  33. ^ "The Dillinger Escape Plan, Every Time I Die, Suicide Silence Confirmed For Vans Warped Tour". Blabbermouth.net. December 19, 2009. Retrieved July 13, 2017. 
  34. ^ "Terror, Every Time I Die, All Shall Perish Confirmed For Hell On Earth European Tour". Blabbermouth.net. March 26, 2010. Retrieved July 13, 2017. 
  35. ^ Paul, Aubin (December 20, 2010). "Groezrock adds Civ, Snapcase, The Black Pacific, Dear Landlord, Hatebreed, Senses Fail". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  36. ^ Common, Tyler (May 4, 2011). "Bled Fest to be headlined by Every Time I Die, full lineup revealed". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  37. ^ Smith, Sarah (August 26, 2011). "Every Time I Die Counter Revolution tour". FasterLouder. Junkee Media. Retrieved July 12, 2017. 
  38. ^ Rock Sound (October 13, 2011). "Every Time I Die Announce New Bassist". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  39. ^ Paul, Aubin (August 7, 2011). "GWAR / Every Time I Die (North America)". Punknews.org. Aubin Paul. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  40. ^ a b Beringer, Drew (September 2, 2009). "Every Time I Die - New Junk Aesthetic - Album Review". AbsolutePunk. SpinMedia. Archived from the original on October 25, 2012. Retrieved July 10, 2017. 
  41. ^ a b Roach, Pemberton. "New Junk Aesthetic - Every Time I Die | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. All Media Network, LLC. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  42. ^ Rankin, Dan (September 21, 2009). "Album Reviews – 21/9/09". Blare. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  43. ^ Chart Attack (October 2, 2009). "Every Time I Die — New Junk Aesthetic". Chart Attack. Channel Zero. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  44. ^ McKay, Alec (September 7, 2009). "Every Time I Die – New Junk Aesthetic". Hearwax. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  45. ^ a b "Every Time I Die - New Junk Aesthetic (album review 3)". Sputnikmusic. September 10, 2009. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  46. ^ Montana, Danny (October 13, 2009). "Album: Every Time I Die – New Junk Aesthetic". Thrash Hits. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  47. ^ UG Team (September 16, 2009). "New Junk Aesthetic | Every Time I Die | Compact Discs | Reviews". Ultimate Guitar. Retrieved July 11, 2017. 
  48. ^ "EVERY TIME I DIE Interviewed On 'Headbangers Ball' (Video)". Blabbermouth.net. June 17, 2012. Retrieved July 12, 2017.