Nestorian pillar of Luoyang

The Nestorian pillar of Luoyang is a Tang Chinese pillar erected in 814-815 CE, which contains inscriptions related to early Christianity in China, particularly the Church of the East. It is a Nestorian pillar, discovered in 2006 in Luoyang, which is related to the Nestorian stele of Xi'an.[1]

Nestorian pillar of Luoyang
Sutras on the Origin of Origins of Ta-ch‘in Luminous Religion.jpg
Rubbing of the Nestorian pillar entitled "大秦景教宣元至本經", which was erected in China in 814-815.
Traditional Chinese大秦景教宣元至本經經幢
Simplified Chinese大秦景教宣元至本经经幢
Literal meaningPillar of the Sutra on the Origin of Origins of Daqin Luminous Religion

The pillarEdit

The title of the pillar is 大秦景教宣元至本經 "Sutra on the Origin of Origins of Daqin Luminous Religion", one of the Jingjiao Documents.[2] The pillar was erected in 814-815 CE, and moved to another location in 829 CE, as explained in one part of the inscriptions.[3] The "sutra" which starts with a Trisagion (Qadishā Alāhā) was dedicated to a deceased Lady An (安氏太夫人) of Sogdian descent. The inscription tells about her ancestors who came from Bukhara in Central Asia; her relatives and clergymen from the Luoyang Daqin Monastery, who attended the funeral service also had typical Sogdian surnames such as Mi (, origin of Maymurgh) and Kang (, of Samarkand, or historically Kangju).[4]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Nicolini-Zani, Matteo (2009). "The Tang Christian Pillar from Luoyang and ITS Jingjiao Inscription a Preliminary Study". Monumenta Serica. 57: 100. doi:10.1179/mon.2009.57.1.003. ISSN 0254-9948. JSTOR 40727622. S2CID 190861764.
  2. ^ Winkler, Dietmar W.; Tang, Li (2009). Hidden Treasures and Intercultural Encounters. 2. Auflage: Studies on East Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 109. ISBN 978-3-643-50045-8.
  3. ^ Winkler, Dietmar W.; Tang, Li (2009). Hidden Treasures and Intercultural Encounters. 2. Auflage: Studies on East Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 110. ISBN 978-3-643-50045-8.
  4. ^ Li, Tang; Winkler, Dietmar W., eds. (2020). Artifact, Text, Context: Studies on Syriac Christianity in China and Central Asia. "orientalia – patristica – oecumenica" series (vol. 17). Zürich: LIT Verlag. pp. 126–127. ISBN 978-3-643-91195-7.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit