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Neil Daswani is a co-director of the Stanford Advanced Security Certification Program, and an expert in web application security. He is the lead author of the book "Foundations of Security: What Every Programmer Needs To Know."

Neil Daswani
Born (1974-09-20) September 20, 1974 (age 45)
CitizenshipUnited States
Alma materStanford University
Columbia University
Known forDasient
Scientific career
FieldsComputer science

In 2008, he co-founded Dasient, a web security company, along with another ex-Googler and Berkeley alum Shariq Rizvi, and former McKinsey strategy consultant Ameet Ranadive. Daswani was previously a product manager at Google.

CareerEdit

Prior to his roles at Google and Stanford, Daswani served in a variety of research, development, teaching, and managerial roles at Yodlee, Lucent, and Bellcore (now Telcordia Technologies). His additional areas of expertise include wireless data technology, and peer-to-peer systems. He has published extensively in these areas,[1] frequently gives talks at industry and academic conferences, and has been granted several U.S. patents.[2]

At Google he led the authoring of "The Anatomy of Clickbot.A",[3] a detailed analysis of a 100,000 machine botnet constructed to conduct click fraud, and a book chapter on "Online Advertising Fraud".[4]

While at Stanford, he was the PhD student of Hector Garcia-Molina, and he co-founded the Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD) Security Certification Program.[5] He received a Ph.D. in computer science. He also holds a M.S. in computer science from Stanford University, and a B.S. in computer science with honors with distinction from Columbia University.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Neil Daswani Publications". Neildaswani.com. Archived from the original on March 10, 2013. Retrieved February 28, 2013.
  2. ^ "Neil Daswani Patents". Neildaswani.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2012. Retrieved February 28, 2013.
  3. ^ "The Anatomy of Clickbot.A" (PDF). Retrieved February 28, 2013.
  4. ^ "Online Advertising Fraud" (PDF). Google.com. Retrieved February 28, 2013.
  5. ^ "Stanford SCPD's Advanced Computer Security Certificate". Scpd.stanford.edu. Retrieved February 28, 2013.

External linksEdit