Nehemia Levtzion

Nehemia Levtzion (Hebrew: נחמיה לבציון‎; November 24, 1935 — August 15, 2003) was an Israeli scholar of African history, Near East, Islamic, and African studies, and the President of the Open University of Israel from 1987 to 1992 and the Executive Director of the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute from 1994 to 1997.[1]

Nehemia Levtzion
נחמיה לבציון
Nehemia Levtzion.jpg
Nehemia Levtzion
Born(1935-11-24)November 24, 1935
DiedAugust 15, 2003(2003-08-15) (aged 67)
NationalityIsraeli
Title
Children4

Early and personal lifeEdit

Levtzion was born in the moshav of Be'er Tuvia.[1] His parents were Pnina (nee Perlow) and Aron Lubetski, who later changed their surname to Levtzion, and he had an older sister named Hanna.[1] He was Jewish, and had four children.[2] His wife Tirtza was a teacher and deputy head of Jerusalem’s Gymnasia Rehavia high school in Jerusalem.[3] They lived for a time in Ghana, where he studied the spread of Islam in Africa;[3] the family also lived in Beit Hakerem in Jerusalem.[3] Levtzion completed a dissertation at the University of London in 1965.[4]

CareerEdit

Levtzion was a scholar of African history, Near East, Islamic, and African studies, and especially Islam in Africa.[3][5] He taught at (starting in 1965) and was Professor of History and Asian and African Studies and the Dean of the Faculty of Humanities (1978-1981) at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Director of the Ben-Zvi Institute for the Study of Jewish Communities in the East (1982-1987), the President of the Open University of Israel (1987-1992), the Executive Director of the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute (1994-1997), and the Chairman of the Council for Higher Education in Israel’s Planning and Budgeting Committee (1997-2003).[2][6][3]

The Nehemia Levtzion Center for Islamic Studies was established at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2004.[7]

Selected publicationsEdit

  • Levtzion, Nehemia (1969). Muslims and Chiefs in West Africa: A Study of Islam in the Middle Volta Basin in the Pre-Colonial Period. Oxford University Press. p. 228.[8][9]
  • Levtzion, Nehemia (1973). Ancient Ghana and Mali. Methuen and Company. p. 283.[10]
  • Levtzion, Nehemia, ed. (1979). Conversion to Islam. Holmes and Meier. p. 272.[11]
  • Levtzion, Nehemia; Fisher, Humphrey J., eds. (1987). Rural and Urban Islam in West Africa. Lynne Rienner Publishers. p. 176.[12]
  • Levtzion, Nehemia; Voll, James O., eds. (1987). Eighteenth-Century Renewal and Reform in Islam. Syracuse University Press. p. 200.[13]
  • Levtzion, Nehemia (1994). Islam in West Africa: Religion, Society and Politics to 1800. Ashgate Publishing. p. 324.[14][15]
  • Levtzion, Nehemia; Pouwels, Randall L. (2000). The History of Islam in Africa. Ohio University Press. p. 592.[16][17]
  • Levtzion, Nehemia (2007). Abitbol, Michel; Nadan, Amos (eds.). Islam in Africa and the Middle East: Studies on Conversion and Renewal. Ashgate/Variorum. p. 336.[18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "The Legacy of Nehemia Levtzion 1935-2003". Canadian Journal of African Studies. 42 (2/3): 230–249. 2008. doi:10.1080/00083968.2008.10751379. JSTOR 40380164. S2CID 219565300.
  2. ^ a b "Nehemia Levtzion; 1935—2003," Sudanic Africa, 14, 2003, 21-32.
  3. ^ a b c d e Judy Siegel-Itzkovich (September 10, 2017). "Dr. Levtzion-Korach is first female to run a state-owned general hospital". The Jerusalem Post.
  4. ^ Wilks, Ivor (2008). "Nehemia Levtzion and Islam in Ghana: Reminiscences". Canadian Journal of African Studies. 42 (2–3): 250–264. doi:10.1080/00083968.2008.10751380. S2CID 148738309.
  5. ^ McDougall, E. Ann (2008). "Engaging with the Legacy of Nehemia Levtzion: An Introduction". Canadian Journal of African Studies. 42 (2/3): 213–229. doi:10.1080/00083968.2008.10751378. JSTOR 40380163. S2CID 219565283.
  6. ^ "Nehemia Levtzion". Ohio University Press / Swallow Press.
  7. ^ "The Nehemia Levtzion Center for Islamic Studies"
  8. ^ Hunwick, J. O. (October 1969). "Muslims and Chiefs in West Africa: a study of Islam in the Middle Volta Basin in the pre-colonial period". African Affairs. 68 (273): 363–364. doi:10.1093/oxfordjournals.afraf.a095936.
  9. ^ Brenner, Louis (April 1971). "Nehemia Levtzion. Muslims and Chiefs in West Africa: A Study of Islam in the Middle Volta Basin in the Pre-Colonial Period. (Oxford Studies in African Affairs.) New York: Oxford University Press. 1969. Pp. xxvi, 228. $7.00". The American Historical Review. 76 (2): 533–534. doi:10.1086/ahr/76.2.533-a.
  10. ^ Fagan, Brian M. (April 1975). "Nehemia Levtzion. Ancient Ghana and Mali. (Studies in African History, 7.) London: Methuen and Company; distrib. by Barnes and Noble, New York. 1973. Pp. x, 283. Cloth $10.00, paper $6.50". The American Historical Review. 80 (2): 448–449. doi:10.1086/ahr/80.2.448.
  11. ^ Stewart, C. C. (October 1980). "Conversion to Islam. Edited by Nehemia Levtzion. New York: Holmes and Meier, 1979. Pp. viii + 272. $29.50". The Journal of African History. 21 (4): 570–571. doi:10.1017/S0021853700018910.
  12. ^ Ibrahim, Jibrin (December 1990). "Rural and Urban Islam in West Africa edited by Nehemia Levtzion and Humphrey J. Fisher Boulder and London, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1987 edn. Pp. vii + 176. £20.95". The Journal of Modern African Studies. 28 (4): 715–716. doi:10.1017/S0022278X00054884.
  13. ^ Brett, Michael (June 1989). "Nehemia Levtzion and John o. Voll, editors. Eighteenth-Century Renewal and Reform in Islam. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press. 1987. Pp. 200. $24.95". The American Historical Review. 94 (3): 822–823. doi:10.1086/ahr/94.3.822.
  14. ^ Hawting, G. R. (June 1995). "Nehemia Levtzion: Islam in west Africa: religion, society and politics to 1800. (Collected Studies Series, CS462.) x, [324] pp. Amersham Hants.: Variorum; Brookfield, Vermont: Ashgate Publishing Co., 1994. £49.50". Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. 58 (2): 435–436. doi:10.1017/S0041977X00011654.
  15. ^ Bangura, Ahmed Sheikh (1997). "Islam in West Africa: Religion, Society and Politics to 1800 (by Nehemia Levtzion) (Book Review)". American Journal of Islamic Social Sciences. 14 (3): 91–92.
  16. ^ Mirzeler, Mustafa (2001). "The History of Islam in Africa (review)". Africa Today. 48 (2): 168–170. doi:10.1353/at.2001.0039. S2CID 143048787.
  17. ^ Reese, Scott (October 2004). "Book Review: The History of Islam in Africa". Journal of Asian and African Studies. 39 (5): 456–458. doi:10.1177/002190960403900516.
  18. ^ Last, Murray (May 2008). "Islam in Africa and the Middle East: Studies on Conversion and Renewal BY NEHEMIAH LEVTZION. Edited by MICHEL ABITBOL and AMOS NADAN". Journal of Islamic Studies. 19 (2): 268–269. doi:10.1093/jis/etn017.