Nebojša Stefanović

Nebojša Stefanović (Serbian Cyrillic: Небојша Стефановић, pronounced [nɛ̌bɔːjʃa stɛfǎːnɔʋitɕ]; born 20 November 1976) is a Serbian politician. He has served as Minister of Defence since 2020 and Deputy Prime Minister since 2016. He is chairman of the Belgrade board of Serbian Progressive Party (SNS).[1]

Nebojša Stefanović
Небојша Стефановић
Nebojsa Stefanovic Cropped.jpg
Nebojša Stefanović in 2015
Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia
Assumed office
11 August 2016
Prime MinisterAleksandar Vučić
Ivica Dačić (Acting)
Ana Brnabić
Preceded byKori Udovički
Minister of Defence
Assumed office
28 October 2020
Prime MinisterAna Brnabić
Succeeded byAleksandar Vulin
Minister of Internal Affairs
In office
27 April 2014 – 28 October 2020
Prime MinisterAleksandar Vučić
Ivica Dačić (Acting)
Ana Brnabić
Preceded byIvica Dačić
Succeeded byAleksandar Vulin
13th Speaker of the National Assembly of Serbia
In office
23 July 2012 – 16 April 2014
PresidentTomislav Nikolić
Preceded bySlavica Đukić Dejanović
Zaharije Trnavčević (Acting)
Succeeded byMaja Gojković
Personal details
Born (1976-11-20) 20 November 1976 (age 44)
Belgrade, SFR Yugoslavia
NationalitySerbian
Political partySerbian Radical Party (−2008)
Serbian Progressive Party (2008–present)
Children2
Alma materMegatrend University
OccupationPolitician
Websitenebojsastefanovic.rs

His past tenure included the speaker of the National Assembly of Serbia from July 2012 until April 2014.[2]

He served as Minister of the Interior of the Republic of Serbia in the period from April 2014 to October 2020.[3]

He began his political career in the Serbian Radical Party (SRS), while in 2008, he was one of the founders of the Serbian Progressive Party (SNS). Stefanović holds a disputed PhD in economics, which caused controversy.

Early life and educationEdit

Nebojša Stefanović was born on 20 November 1976 in Belgrade. He grew up in New Belgrade, where he finished elementary school and IX Grammar School "Mihajlo Petrović Alas" in Belgrade. He graduated from the Graduate School of Business Studies of the Megatrend University. He received his master's degree in Economics defending his master's thesis Contemporary Principles of Management in Local Self-Government in 2011. Furthermore, in June 2013, he earned his doctorate in Economics with the thesis A New Role of Strategic Management in Managing Local Self-Government.

He has begun his business career in 2004 in domestic and foreign trade company "Interspeed Ltd." on the position of Marketing Manager. In 2008, he was appointed on the position of deputy financial director of company "Jabuka."

Nebojša Stefanović speaks English and Russian. He has two children.[4]

Political careerEdit

Stefanović has been involved in politics for more than 25 years. He has begun his political career in the Serbian Radical Party (SRS). He is one of the founders of the Serbian Progressive Party (SNS), member of the Presidency[5] and chairman of the Belgrade board of Serbian Progressive Party.[6] As the chairman of the Belgrade board, he made significant achievements along with his team. In the 2014 Belgrade City Assembly election, SNS came to power with 43.62% votes,[7] while in the 2018 election, SNS won again with 44.99% votes.[8]

From the establishment of the SNS until the fourth assembly of the SNS (held in 2016), he was a vice president of the main board of SNS.

Member of ParliamentEdit

As a representative of SRS, He was a councillor in the City Assembly of Belgrade during the 2004–2008 tenure. In the 2007 parliamentary elections, he was elected for member of the National Assembly of Serbia,[9] and in the same time he served as Chair of the Committee for Trade and Tourism of the National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia.

In the 2012 parliamentary elections, as a representative of SNS, he was reelected for member of the National Assembly of Serbia and councillor in the City Assembly of Belgrade.

Speaker of the National Assembly of SerbiaEdit

From July 2012 until April 2014, Nebojša Stefanović was Speaker of the National Assembly of Serbia, as well as the Chair of the Committee for the Rights of the Child. Moreover, he was a Head of Delegation of the National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia in the Inter-Parliamentary Union.[10]

During his tenure as speaker of the National Assembly, he was remembered for his struggles and commitments to pregnant women and mothers. On his initiative, the Law on Right to Healthcare for children, pregnant women and maternities was adopted.[11] He also launched the notable initiative Priorities for children and pregnant women, which is in force up to this date.[12]

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Internal AffairsEdit

After the 2014 parliamentary elections, he was appointed on the position of the minister of the interior. He was reelected on the same position after the 2016 parliamentary elections, as well as appointed for the deputy prime minister. He has remained on the same positions after the 2017 cabinet reshuffle.[13]

During his tenure as the minister of the interior, numerous of reforms have been implemented. One, out of his many personal initiatives, was implementation of the program Children Security Basics in the first, fourth and sixth grades of elementary schools in Serbia. The purpose of this program is to introduce children with all challenges and dangers they can encounter.[14]

He is the first minister of the interior which has launched the initiative for building of the monument for the fallen police officers in Belgrade.[15]

Besides these, he has been holding position of the president of the Council for the fight against human trafficking,[16] commander of the Headquarters for emergency situation of the Republic of Serbia,[17] the president of the National Council for fight against hazardous occurrences in sports,[18] as well as the president of the Coordination team for guiding activities in fight against money laundering and terrorism financing.[19] From 7 November 2017, he was appointed as a Secretary of the National Security Council, and at the same time the Head of the Bureau for Coordination of Security Services.[20]

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of DefenceEdit

On 28 October 2020, the National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia elected a new Government of the Republic of Serbia led by the Prime Minister Ana Brnabić. On 29 October 2020, the newly elected Minister of Defense Nebojša Stefanović, assumed the office from the former Minister, Aleksandar Vulin.

Doctorate controversyEdit

On 1 June 2014, a group of Serbian academics based in the UK published an article claiming that parts of Mr. Stefanović's doctoral dissertation were plagiarised.[21]

In June 2014 the Senate of Megatrend University formed a commission with the agenda of evaluation of merits for initiation of the procedure for his doctorate annulment.[22] The university Senate then adopted a report from the Commission which stated that there were no grounds for initiation of the procedure for the Nebojša Stefanović's doctorate annulment.[23] In August 2014 another independent Commission was formed by the Senate which later unanimously ruled that there were no grounds for initiation of the procedure for Nebojša Stefanović's doctorate annulment.[24]

Arms trade scandalEdit

A GIM letter dated 27 April 2017 to Krusik lists the names of three GIM representatives and three Raniad Al Jazira employees who visited the arms factory in order to inspect and accept the ordered weapons. Among the GIM representatives was Branko Stefanovic.[25]

According to documents leaked by whistleblower Aleksandar Obradovic (a Krusik munitions plant employee), the minister’s father Branko Stefanovic was involved in the purchase of mortar shells at privileged prices from Krusik.[26]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Биографија". Небојша Стефановић. 27 February 2013. Archived from the original on 14 April 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  2. ^ "National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia | Multi-party National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia (1991–2018)". www.parlament.gov.rs. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  3. ^ srbija.gov.rs. "Примопредаја дужности у Министарству одбране и МУП-у". www.srbija.gov.rs (in Serbian). Retrieved 30 October 2020.
  4. ^ srbija.gov.rs. "Nebojsa Stefanovic". www.srbija.gov.rs. Retrieved 30 October 2020.
  5. ^ "STRANKA IZABRALA: Ovo su novi članovi Predsedništva SNS-a" (in Serbian). Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  6. ^ "Председник Градског одбора Београд Српске напредне странке". Небојша Стефановић. 9 May 2013. Archived from the original on 13 April 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  7. ^ "Избори Уживо". www.izbori.live. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  8. ^ "KONAČNI REZULTATI IZBORA U BEOGRADU: Lista "Aleksandar Vučić – Zato što volimo Beorgad" osvojila 44,99 odsto glasova". www.novosti.rs (in Serbian). Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  9. ^ "National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia | 14 February 2007 legislature". www.parlament.gov.rs. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  10. ^ "National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia | Delegations". www.parlament.gov.rs. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  11. ^ "Paragraf | Arhiva vesti | 28 November 2013". www.paragraf.rs. Archived from the original on 13 April 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  12. ^ Serbia, RTS, Radio televizija Srbije, Radio Television of. "Društvena briga za decu i trudnice" (in Serbian). Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  13. ^ "Потпредседници и министри". www.srbija.gov.rs. Retrieved 13 April 2018.
  14. ^ "Stefanović: Uvodi se predmet "Osnovi bezbednosti dece"". Dnevni list Danas (in Serbian). 23 February 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  15. ^ "Poginulim policajcima spomen-obeležje u BG". B92.net (in Serbian). Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  16. ^ "Министарство финансија – Влада републике Србије – online". www.mfin.gov.rs. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  17. ^ "Odluka o obrazovanju Republičkog štaba za vanredne situacije". www.pravno-informacioni-sistem.rs. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  18. ^ "Konstituisan "Nacionalni savet za sprečavanje negativnih pojava u sportu"". Dnevni list Danas (in Serbian). 9 December 2017. Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  19. ^ "Brnabić: Izveštaj FATF-a više ne odražava realnu situaciju". N1 Srbija (in Serbian). Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  20. ^ "Stefanović je novi šef Biroa za koordinaciju rada službi bezbednosti". N1 Srbija (in Serbian). Retrieved 17 April 2018.
  21. ^ Getting a PhD in Serbia has Never Been Easier: The Case of Minister of Internal Affairs Nebojša Stefanović. Balkanist. 1 June 2014.
  22. ^ "Одлука о образовању Комисије" (PDF). Мегатренд универзитет. 5 June 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2018.
  23. ^ "Усвајање извештаја Комисије" (PDF). Мегатренд универзитет. 11 June 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2018.
  24. ^ "Стаб независне Комисије" (PDF). Мегатренд универзитет. 23 September 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 16 April 2018.
  25. ^ http://armswatch.com/leaked-arms-dealers-passports-reveal-who-supplies-terrorists-in-yemen-serbia-files-part-3/
  26. ^ "Serbian Anti-Corruption Agency tells N1 it is investigating Minister Stefanovic". N1 Srbija (in Serbian). Retrieved 21 December 2019.

External linksEdit

Political offices
Preceded by
Slavica Đukić Dejanović
President of the National Assembly
2012–2014
Succeeded by
Maja Gojković
Preceded by
Ivica Dačić
Minister of Internal Affairs
2014–2020
Succeeded by
Aleksandar Vulin
Preceded by
Aleksandar Vulin
Minister of Defence
2020–present
Incumbent