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Natural Resources Canada

The Department of Natural Resources (French: Ministère des Ressources naturelles), operating under the FIP applied title Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), is the ministry of the government of Canada responsible for natural resources, energy, minerals and metals, forests, earth sciences, mapping and remote sensing. It was created in 1995 by amalgamating the now-defunct Departments of Energy, Mines and Resources and Forestry. Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) works to ensure the responsible development of Canada's natural resources, including energy, forests, minerals and metals. NRCan also uses its expertise in earth sciences to build and maintain an up-to-date knowledge base of our landmass and resources. To promote internal collaboration, NRCan has implemented a departmental wide wiki based on MediaWiki.[1] Natural Resources Canada also collaborates with American and Mexican government scientists, along with the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, to produce the North American Environmental Atlas, which is used to depict and track environmental issues for a continental perspective.

Department of Natural Resources
Ministère des Ressources naturelles
NRCAN Logo.png
Department overview
Formed1842
TypeDepartment responsible for natural resources, energy, minerals and metals, forests, earth sciences, mapping and remote sensing
JurisdictionCanada
Minister responsible
Deputy Minister responsible
  • Christyne Tremblay
Child agencies
Websitewww.nrcan.gc.ca/home Edit this at Wikidata

Under the Canadian constitution, responsibility for natural resources belongs to the provinces, not the federal government. However, the federal government has jurisdiction over off-shore resources, trade and commerce in natural resources, statistics, international relations, and boundaries. The current Minister of Natural Resources is Amarjeet Sohi as of July 18, 2018.

The department is governed by the Resources and Technical Surveys Act, R.S.C., c.R-7 and the Department of Natural Resources Act, S.C. 1994, c. 41.

The department currently has these sectors:

  • Corporate Management and Services Sector
  • Earth Sciences Sector
  • Energy Sector
  • Innovation and Energy Technology Sector
  • Minerals and Metals Sector
  • Strategic Policy and Results Sector
  • Public Affairs and Portfolio Management Sector
  • Shared Services Office
  • Geographical Names Board of Canada
  • Space Weather Canada[2]

Natural Resource of Canada have numerous sub-departments, including:

The following sub-agencies are attached to the department:

Related legislationEdit

Acts for which Natural Resources Canada has responsibility

  • Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act
  • Canada Foundation for Sustainable Development Technology Act
  • Canada Labour Code
  • Canada Lands Surveyors Act
  • Canada Lands Surveys Act
  • Canada-Newfoundland Atlantic Accord Implementation Act
  • Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources Accord Implementation Act
  • Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act
  • Canada Petroleum Resources Act
  • Canadian Energy Regulator Act
  • Canadian Ownership and Control Determination Act
  • Cape Breton Development Corporation Act
  • Cape Breton Development Corporation Divestiture Authorization and Dissolution Act
  • Cooperative Energy Act
  • Department of Natural Resources Act
  • Energy Administration Act
  • Energy Efficiency Act
  • Energy Supplies Emergency Act
  • Explosives Act
  • Export and Import of Rough Diamonds Act
  • Forestry Act
  • Hibernia Development Project Act
  • International Boundary Commission Act
  • Northern Pipeline Act
  • Nuclear Energy Act
  • Nuclear Fuel Waste Act
  • Nuclear Liability Act
  • Nuclear Safety and Control Act
  • Oil Substitution and Conservation Act
  • Resources and Technical Surveys Act

Not in forceEdit

  • Greenhouse Gas Technology Investment Fund Act

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2008 Medalists". Archived from the original on 2 February 2009. Retrieved 26 November 2008.
  2. ^ Smith, Marie-Danielle (30 December 2017). "Forty years ago, she pioneered Canada's space weather programs. Now, they might prevent another stone age". The National Post. Retrieved 7 January 2019.

External linksEdit