Natalia Partyka

Natalia Dorota Partyka (born 27 July 1989) is a Polish table tennis player. Born without a right hand and forearm, she participates in competitions for able-bodied athletes[3] as well as in competitions for athletes with disabilities. Partyka reached the last 32 of the London 2012 Olympic women's table tennis.

Natalia Partyka
Natalia Partyka (POL).jpg
Personal information
Full nameNatalia Dorota Partyka
Nationality Poland
Born (1989-07-27) 27 July 1989 (age 33)[1]
Gdańsk, Poland
Highest ranking1 (November 2018; Para)
48 (May 2010; Able-bodied[2])
Height1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)[1]
Medal record
Women's table tennis
Representing  Poland
European Games
Bronze medal – third place 2019 Minsk Team
European Championships
Silver medal – second place 2009 Stuttgart Team
Bronze medal – third place 2008 St. Petersburg Doubles
Paralympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2004 Athens Class 10
Gold medal – first place 2008 Beijing Class 10
Gold medal – first place 2012 London Class 10
Gold medal – first place 2016 Rio de Janeiro Class 10
Gold medal – first place 2016 Rio de Janeiro Team class 6–10
Gold medal – first place 2020 Tokyo Team class 6–10
Silver medal – second place 2008 Beijing Team class 6–10
Bronze medal – third place 2012 London Team class 6–10
Bronze medal – third place 2020 Tokyo Class 10
European Para Table Tennis Championships
Gold medal – first place 1999 Piestany Teams class 10
Gold medal – first place 2001 Frankfurt Teams class 10
Gold medal – first place 2003 Zagreb Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2003 Zagreb Teams class 10
Gold medal – first place 2005 Gesolo Open singles standing
Gold medal – first place 2005 Gesolo Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2005 Gesolo Teams class 9-10
Gold medal – first place 2007 Kranjska Gora Open singles standing
Gold medal – first place 2007 Kranjska Gora Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2007 Kranjska Gora Teams class 9-10
Gold medal – first place 2009 Genoa Open singles standing
Gold medal – first place 2009 Genoa Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2009 Genoa Teams class 9-10
Gold medal – first place 2011 Split Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2015 Vejle Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2015 Vejle Teams class 9-10
Gold medal – first place 2017 Lasko Singles class 10
Silver medal – second place 2001 Frankfurt Singles class 10
Silver medal – second place 2003 Zagreb Open singles standing
World Para Table Tennis Championships
Gold medal – first place 2002 Taipei Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2002 Taipei Teams class 10
Gold medal – first place 2006 Montreux Open singles standing
Gold medal – first place 2010 Gwangju Open singles standing
Gold medal – first place 2010 Gwangju Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2014 Beijing Singles class 10
Gold medal – first place 2018 Lasko-Celje Singles class 10
Silver medal – second place 2006 Montreux Singles class 10
Silver medal – second place 2006 Montreux Teams class 9-10
Silver medal – second place 2014 Beijing Teams class 9-10
Bronze medal – third place 2010 Gwangju Teams class 9-10

Early lifeEdit

Partyka began playing table tennis at the age of one to seven years. She won her first international table tennis medal in 1999 at the disabled World Championships. At the age of 11, when she competed at the 2000 Summer Paralympics in Sydney, she became the world's youngest ever Paralympian. In 2004, she won a gold medal in the singles event and silver in the team event at the Athens Paralympics. Also in 2004, she won two gold medals at the International Table Tennis Federation's European Championships for Cadets, which was open to able-bodied competitors. In 2006, Partyka won three gold medals at the European Paralympic Championships, one gold and two silvers at the International Paralympic Committee's Table Tennis World Championships for Disabled, and a silver in the team event at the ITTF European Junior Championship. She also won two silver medals and one bronze at the 2007 edition of that competition. Also in 2007, Partyka won three gold medals at the European Paralympic Championships, and a bronze at the ITTF World Junior Teams Championships.[4]

Olympics and Paralympics performanceEdit

Partyka competed for Poland both the 2008 Summer Olympics and the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing – one of only two athletes to do so, the other being Natalie du Toit in swimming.[4] They were her third Paralympic Games, and her first Olympics. Competing in class 10 at the Beijing Paralympics, she won gold by defeating China's Fan Lei by three sets to nil.[5]

In 2008, she won a gold medal in the singles event and a silver in the team event at the Beijing Paralympics, repeating her Athens Paralympics result.

 
Partyka (center) at the Paralympic 2016

She competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics and 2012 Summer Paralympics in London. In the Olympics, she competed in women's singles table tennis.[6] On 3 September 2012 Partyka defeated China's Qiang Yang 3–2 in the gold medal match to become Paralympic champion. On 8 September 2012 she won bronze in the women's team class 6–10, after defeating France 3–2.

At the 2016 Summer Olympics she competed in the women's team event and later won her fourth consecutive Paralympic singles gold medal at the 2016 Summer Paralympics.[7][8]

Awards and recognitionsEdit

For her sport achievements, Partyka received:
  Knight's Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta (5th class) in 2008
  Officer's Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta (4th class) in 2013

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Natalia Partyka". Sports-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2012.
  2. ^ "Partyka Natalia". Table Tennis Guide. Retrieved 20 October 2019.
  3. ^ PARTYKA Natalia (POL) International Table Tennis Federation.
  4. ^ a b Natalia: Paralympic AND Olympic athlete Archived 2012-09-06 at archive.today, London 2012, 18 June 2008.
  5. ^ Natalia Partyka: Pole apart China Daily, 11 September 2008.
  6. ^ "The disabled Olympians ... not Paralympians" BBC Blogs, 2 August 2012.
  7. ^ Natalia Partyka International Paralympic Committee, Retrieved 26 July 2021.
  8. ^ Natalia Partyka Olympics, Retrieved 26 July 2021.

External linksEdit