Nancy Nevinson

Nancy Nevinson (26 July 1918 – 25 January 2012) was an English actress.[1] She was born Nancy Ezekiel, one of four children of Reemah {née Kadoorie) and David Ezekiel, members of the Baghdadi-Jewish community of Calcutta, India, during the Raj. The family moved to London in the 1930s, where Nancy trained at RADA and took the stage name Nancy Nevinson, which she retained after her subsequent marriage to Commander William Hoyes-Cock.[2]

Nancy Nevinson
Actress Nancy Nevinson.jpg
Born(1918-07-26)26 July 1918
Chittagong, East Bengal, British India
Died25 January 2012(2012-01-25) (aged 93)
Alma materRADA
OccupationActress

Early lifeEdit

Nevinson was born in Chittagong, East Bengal, British India.

CareerEdit

Nevison worked on stage,[3][4] in film and on television.[5] She also dubbed voices for both young and old.[6] She appeared in the films Foxhole in Cairo (1960), Light in the Piazza (1962), Mrs. Gibbons' Boys (1962), Ring of Spies (1964),[7][8] The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965), For the Love of Ada (1972), Symptoms (1974), Jesus of Nazareth (1977), S.O.S. Titanic (1979), Le Pétomane (1979), Raise the Titanic (1980),[9][10] Young Sherlock Holmes (1985), and Mrs Dalloway (1997).[11][12]

FamilyEdit

Nevinson married Commander William Hoyes-Cock (1905-1973), whom she met while touring with the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA) during WW2. They had three children: Nigel Nevinson, Jennifer (Gennie) Nevinson, and Hugh Hoyes-Cock. Nigel and Gennie are both actors.[13]

RetirementEdit

In 2001, she moved to Wokingham, to a retirement home funded by the Cinema and Television Benevolent Fund especially for film- and TV-personalities. Nevinson died there on 25 January 2012, aged 93.[14]

FilmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Theatre World. Iliffe Specialist Publications, Limited. 1964. p. 34.
  2. ^ http://www.jewishcalcutta.in/exhibits/show/film_p/nancy-nevinson
  3. ^ Playgoer Monthly. Co-operative Press. 1949. p. 128.
  4. ^ John Gielgud (1 April 2005). Sir John Gielgud: A Life in Letters. Arcade Publishing. pp. 83–. ISBN 978-1-55970-755-8.
  5. ^ Michele Hilmes (23 May 2012). Network Nations: A Transnational History of British and American Broadcasting. Routledge. pp. 247–. ISBN 978-1-136-91118-7.
  6. ^ Marcus Hearn; Simon Archer; Gerry Anderson (2002). What Made Thunderbirds Go!: The Authorized Biography of Gerry Anderson. BBC. p. 43. ISBN 978-0-563-53481-5.
  7. ^ The Film Daily. Wid's Films and Film Folk Incorporated. 1964. p. 200.
  8. ^ Film Bulletin. Wax Publications. 1964. p. 64.
  9. ^ Paul Mavis (3 March 2011). The Espionage Filmography: United States Releases, 1898 through 1999. McFarland. pp. 495–. ISBN 978-1-4766-0427-5.
  10. ^ D. Brian Anderson (22 March 2005). The Titanic in Print and on Screen: An Annotated Guide to Books, Films, Television Shows and Other Media. McFarland. pp. 171–. ISBN 978-0-7864-1786-5.
  11. ^ Frances Stephens (1960). Theatre World Annual. Macmillan.
  12. ^ Playgoer Monthly. Co-operative Press. 1949.
  13. ^ http://www.jewishcalcutta.in/exhibits/show/film_p/nancy-nevinson
  14. ^ Nancy Nevinson at IMDb
  15. ^ "Television: Glimpses of Reality". The Spectator, 18 April 1958, Page 13. By JOHN BRAINE
  16. ^ John Howard Reid (1 March 2006). America's Best, Britain's Finest: A Survey of Mixed Movies. Lulu.com. pp. 106–. ISBN 978-1-4116-7877-4.
  17. ^ "Movie Review: Light in the Piazza (1962)". The New York Times.
  18. ^ Tony Shaw (3 September 2006). British Cinema and the Cold War: The State, Propaganda and Consensus. I.B.Tauris. pp. 59–. ISBN 978-1-84511-211-0.
  19. ^ University of Southern California. Division of Cinema; American Film Institute; Center for Understanding Media (1964). Filmfacts.
  20. ^ "Ring of Spies (1964)" Film Review. French Film Site.

External linksEdit