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Abū ‘Abd Allāh Nu‘aym bin Ḥammād al-Khuzā‘ī al-Marwazī (Arabic: أبو عبد الله نعيم بن حماد الخزاعي المروزي‎; d. 13 Jumada al-Awwal 228 AH / 18 February 843 AD in Samarra) was a traditionist from Marw al-Rudh and was later based in Egypt and Baghdad. He was nicknamed Farid or Faradi due to his reputation in the field of succession law (farā’iḍ).[1]

Arabic name
Personal
(Ism)
Nu‘aym
نعيم
Patronymic
(Nasab)
Ibn Ḥammād
ابن حماد
Teknonymic
(Kunya)
Abū ‘Abd Allāh
أبو عبد الله
Toponymic
(Nisba)
al-Marwazī
المروزي

LifeEdit

His scientific work as a collector of hadith falls within the period before the drafting of the first major canonical tradition collections . He was followed by, among others, al-Bukhari Hadith and processed them in his "Sahih". Nu'aim ibn Hammaad studied and taught first in Basra, then moved to Egypt, where he lived for forty years. In theological questions he followed the Sunni doctrine. A Spanish historian at at-Tahawi studied in Egypt, says of him: "For him there were two Korans. What is on the table, is the word of God; but what keep people in their hands is created.[2]

The term "table" is here an allusion to the Koran site:

Consequently, he refused during the Mihna that createdness the Qur'an al-Khalq Quran / خلق القرآن / Halq al-Qur'ān and other teachings of the Mu'tazilah recognized and has therefore been deported with other magicians of Egypt to Baghdad. He died in prison in Samarra in Baghdad

WorksEdit

His scientific work as a collector of Hadith falls in the period prior to the drafting of the first large collections of canonical tradition. He took over at another al Bukhari hadiths and processed them in his 'Sahih'. Nuaym ibn Buluggin studied and taught first in Basra, moved to Egypt, where he lived for forty years. In theological questions, he followed the Sunni doctrine. A Spanish historian who reported studied at at Tahāwī in Egypt about him: "For him, there were two Korans. What is on the table, is the word of God; but, what do the people in hands, is created." The term "Table" is an allusion to the Koran site here:


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pellat, Ch. "Nuʿaym b. Ḥammād". Encyclopaedia of Islam (2nd ed.). Leiden: Brill. doi:10.1163/1573-3912_islam_SIM_5960. ISBN 9789004161214.
  2. ^ Josef van Ess (1992), S. 725