NGC 5090 and NGC 5091

NGC 5090 and NGC 5091 are a set of galaxies approximately 160 million light-years (50 million parsecs) away in the constellation Centaurus.[1] They are in the process of colliding and merging with some evidence of tidal disruption of NGC 5091.[2]

NGC 5090 and NGC 5091
Phot-20d-99-hires (cropped).jpg
NGC 5091 (left) and NGC 5090 (right)
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
ConstellationCentaurus
Right ascension5090: 13h 21m 12.8s
5091: 13h 21m 17.7s
Declination5090: −43° 42′ 16.4″
5091: −43° 43′ 10.8″
Redshift5090: 0.01141±0.00007
5091: 0.01177±0.00048
Helio radial velocity5090: 3420.93±20.98
5091: 3528.86±145.10
Distance5090: 50.37 ± 3.55 Mpc      (164.3 ± 11.6 Mly)
5091: 51.85 ± 4.15 Mpc      (169.1 ± 13.5 Mly)
Apparent magnitude (V)5090: 11.51
5091: 13.35
Apparent magnitude (B)5090: 12.59
5091: 13.94
Absolute magnitude (V)5090: -24.8
5091: -21.0
Characteristics
Type5090: E2
5091: Sb pec sp
Apparent size (V)5090: 2′.9 × 2′.4
5091: 1′.8 × 0′.5
Notable featuresInteracting galaxies
Other designations
PGC 46618 / 46626, ESO 270-2 / 270-4, LEDA 46618 / 46626, 2MASX J13211286-4342168 / J13211859-4343244
References: [1]

NGC 5090 is an elliptical galaxy while NGC 5091 is a barred spiral galaxy.[1] The radial velocity of the nucleus of NGC 5090 has been measured at 3,185 km/s (1,979 mi/s), while NGC 5091 has a radial velocity of 3,429 km/s (2,131 mi/s).[2] NGC 5090 is associated with the strong, double radio source PKS 1318-43.[2]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Results for object NGC 5090". NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
    "Results for object NGC 5091". NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Retrieved 9 March 2019.
  2. ^ a b c "Galaxy pair NGC 5090 and NGC 5091". European Southern Observatory. 30 April 1999. Retrieved 9 March 2019.

External linksEdit

Coordinates:   13h 21m 17.7s, −43° 43′ 11″