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Sheikh Musa Hadeib was the head of Mount Hebron farmers' party and a founder of the Zionist-supported Muslim National Associations. He was from the village of Dawaymeh near Hebron.[1]

In October 1929, Musa Hadeib was killed near the Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem accused of collaborating with the Zionists.[2] His killers were never apprehended, but both his family and the Zionist Executive claimed that the followers of Amin al-Husseini, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem and the leader of the Supreme Muslim Council, were responsible.[2][3] His killers, according to Zionist intelligence, were three men dressed as women, from the Maraqa clan of Hebron.[4]

The JTA reported the incident as having occurred on October 13, 1929 stating "Great excitement prevailed in Jerusalem today over the murder of Musa Isdeb, an Arab from a village near Hebron, who was killed at Herod’s Gate... It is presumed that the Arab is a victim of inner political enmities between Arab factions, the murdered man supposedly being active in propaganda against the Grand Mufti."[5]

A follow-up article from October 22, 1929 called the incident a blood feud "between the family of the late Mousa Adeb, founder of the Arab peasant party and opponent of the Grand Mufti, and the clan of Amin El Husseini."[6]

Hadeib was the first Arab public figure who was assassinated and took place only two months following the 1929 Palestine riots.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Cohen, Hillel Army of Shadows: Palestinian collaboration with Zionism, 1917–1948. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009. p. 15-17
  2. ^ a b Cohen, Hillel Army of Shadows: Palestinian collaboration with Zionism, 1917–1948. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009. p. 59
  3. ^ Shadowplays, by Neve Gordon, The Nation, March 24, 2008
  4. ^ The Tangled Truth, By Benny Morris, The New Republic; 7/5/08[clarification needed]
  5. ^ "Murder of Arab Causes Great Excitement". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Retrieved 2017-05-10.
  6. ^ "Feud Threatens Between Family of Murdered Arab and Grand Mufti's Clan". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Retrieved 2017-05-10.