Mucrospirifer

  (Redirected from Mucrospirifer mucronatus)

Mucrospirifer is a genus of extinct brachiopods in the class Rhynchonellata (Articulata) and the order Spiriferida. They are sometimes known as "butterfly shells".[1] Like other brachiopods, they were filter feeders. These fossils occur mainly in Middle Devonian strata.[1]

Mucrospirifer
Temporal range: Devonian
Mucrospirifer mucronatus Silica Shale.JPG
Scientific classification
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Mucrospirifer

Grabau, 1931
Species

See text.

The biconvex shell was typically 2.5 cm long,[1] but sometimes grew to 4 cm. The shell of Mucrospirifer has a fold, sulcus and costae. It is greatly elongated along the hinge line, which extends outward to form sharp points.[1] This gives them a fin- or wing-like appearance. The apex area (umbo) of the pedicle valve contains a small fold for the pedicle.[1] Mucrospirifer lived in muddy marine sediments, and were attached to the sea floor via the pedicle. The shell sometimes looks like two seashells stuck together.

Select speciesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Walker, Cyril Alexander. (2002). Fossils. Ward, David J., Keates, Colin. (2nd American ed.). New York: Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 0-7894-8984-8. OCLC 50722423.

ReferencesEdit

  • Walker, Cyril and Ward, David. Fossils. Smithsonian Handbooks, Dorling Kindersley Limited, London. Printed in Singapore (2002).
  • Color reconstruction of Mucrospirifer arkonensis at www.emilydamstra.com