Mu Sheng

Mu Sheng (Chinese: 沐晟; Vietnamese: Mộc Thạnh; 1368–1439), courtesy name Jingmao (景茂), was a general of the Ming dynasty in China.

Mu Sheng
沐晟
Marquis of Xiping (西平侯)
In office
1399–1408
Preceded byMu Chun
Succeeded bytitle changed
Duke of Qian (黔國公)
In office
1408–1438
Preceded bytitle changed
Succeeded byMu Bin
Personal details
Born1368
Died1439
Chuxiong, Yunnan
ChildrenMu Bin (沐斌)
ParentsMu Ying (father)
Courtesy nameJingmao (景茂)
Posthumous nameZhongjing (忠敬)

Mu Sheng was the second son of Mu Ying, the first Marquis of Xiping (西平侯). He was a solemn man of few words, and Hongwu Emperor very liked him. In 1399, his elder brother Mu Chun died without heir, so Mu Sheng succeeded him as Marquis of Xiping.[1]

Mu was dispatched to attack Vietnam together with Zhang Fu in 1406. In the next year, they captured the Vietnamese usurper Hồ Quý Ly, and his son Hồ Hán Thương. The Vietnam was annexed by China again and renamed to Jiaozhi province (Vietnamese: Giao Chỉ).[2] For this accomplishment, he was elevated to the title "Duke of Qian" (黔國公).[1]

In 1408, Trần Ngỗi, a Vietnamese prince, revolted against Ming China. Mu was dispatched to put down the rebellion, but was defeated. In the next year, Zhang Fu was sent to Vietnam again to support him. It proved that Mu was a general did not have military talents.[1] Zhang captured Trần Ngỗi in 1410 successfully and came back to Nanjing,[3] but Mu failed to put down the rebellion of the other prince, Trần Quý Khoáng, until Zhang Fu came to assist him again. They crushed the rebellion in 1414, and Mu was granted the title of Grand Tutor (太傅).[1]

In 1426, he was sent to Vietnam again together with Liu Sheng to put down the rebellion of Lê Lợi,[1] whom later became the founder of Lê dynasty. Later, Liu was killed by Vietnamese in Ải Chi Lăng,[4] Mu had to retreat from Vietnam. Finally, Hongxi Emperor decided to abandon Jiaozhi Province, and Vietnamese gained independence again.[5]

Mu Sheng took part in Luchuan–Pingmian campaigns together with Mu Ang (沐昂) and Fang Zheng (方政). Fang Zheng was defeated and killed in action, Mu Sheng had to retreat. He died in Chuxiong. He was elevated to the title "Prince Dingyuan" (定遠王) and given the posthumous name Zhongjing (忠敬) posthumously. His eldest son Mu Bin (沐斌) succeeded as Duke of Qian.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f History of Ming, vol. 126
  2. ^ China and Vietnam: The Politics of Asymmetry by Brantly Womack, p. 126
  3. ^ Việt Nam sử lược by Trần Trọng Kim, Quyển 1, Chương 12
  4. ^ Geoff Wade, translator, Southeast Asia in the Ming Shi-lu: an open access resource, Singapore: Asia Research Institute and the Singapore E-Press, National University of Singapore, http://epress.nus.edu.sg/msl/entry/398, accessed July 13, 2016.
  5. ^ Việt Nam sử lược by Trần Trọng Kim, Quyển 1, Chương 14
Mu Sheng
House of Duke of Qian
Preceded by
Mu Chun
Marquis of Xiping (西平侯)
1399 – 1408
Succeeded by
title changed
Preceded by
title changed
Duke of Qian (黔國公)
1408 – 1438
Succeeded by
Mu Bin