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Admiralty Mountains

  (Redirected from Mount Sabine)

The Admiralty Mountains (alternatively Admiralty Range) is a large group of high mountains and individually named ranges and ridges in northeastern Victoria Land, Antarctica. This mountain group is bounded by the Ross Sea, the Southern Ocean, and by the Dennistoun, Ebbe, and Tucker glaciers.[1] The mountain range is situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Admiralty Mountains
Mt Herschel, Antarctica, Jan 2006.jpg
Mount Herschel (3,335 m) in the Admiralty Mountains as seen from Cape Hallett
Highest point
PeakMount Minto
Elevation4,165 m (13,665 ft)
Coordinates71°47′S 168°45′E / 71.783°S 168.750°E / -71.783; 168.750
Geography
ContinentAntarctica
State/ProvinceVictoria Land
Range coordinates71°45′S 168°30′E / 71.750°S 168.500°E / -71.750; 168.500Coordinates: 71°45′S 168°30′E / 71.750°S 168.500°E / -71.750; 168.500
Parent rangeTransantarctic Mountains

It was discovered in January 1841 by Captain James Ross, who named them for the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty under whose orders he served.[1]

The Admiralty Mountains are divided into the Dunedin Range, Homerun Range, and Lyttelton Range.

Mountains and peaksEdit

This range includes the following mountains and peaks:

Mountain/Peak metres feet coordinates
Mount Minto 4,165 13,665 71°47′S 168°45′E / 71.783°S 168.750°E / -71.783; 168.750
Mount Adam 4,010 13,156 71°47′S 168°37′E / 71.783°S 168.617°E / -71.783; 168.617
Mount Ajax 3,770 12,369 71°48′S 168°27′E / 71.800°S 168.450°E / -71.800; 168.450
Mount Sabine 3,720 12,205 71°55′S 169°33′E / 71.917°S 169.550°E / -71.917; 169.550
Mount Royalist 3,640 11,942 71°47′S 168°30′E / 71.783°S 168.500°E / -71.783; 168.500
Mount Bevin 3,490 11,450 71°54′S 169°27′E / 71.900°S 169.450°E / -71.900; 169.450
Mount Black Prince 3,405 11,171 71°47′S 168°15′E / 71.783°S 168.250°E / -71.783; 168.250
Mount Peacock 3,210 10,531 72°13′S 169°27′E / 72.217°S 169.450°E / -72.217; 169.450
Mount Gilruth 3,160 10,367 71°44′S 168°48′E / 71.733°S 168.800°E / -71.733; 168.800
Mount Achilles 2,880 9,449 71°53′S 168°08′E / 71.883°S 168.133°E / -71.883; 168.133
Mount Parker 1,260 4,134 71°15′S 168°05′E / 71.250°S 168.083°E / -71.250; 168.083

Mount AchillesEdit

Mount Achilles is a prominent pyramidal mountain rising from the divide between Fitch Glacier and Man-o-War Glacier. Named by New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1957–58, after the former New Zealand cruiser HMNZS Achilles.[2]

Mount AdamEdit

Mount Adam is situated 4 km (2.5 mi) WNW of Mount Minto. Discovered in January 1841 by Captain Ross who named this feature for Vice Admiral Sir Charles Adam, a senior naval lord of the Admiralty.[3]

Mount AjaxEdit

Mount Ajax rises 1.5 km (1 mi) WSW of Mount Royalist. Named by the New Zealand GSAE, 1957–58, after HMNZS Ajax. The mountain is one of several in this area named for New Zealand ships.[4]

Mount BevinEdit

Mount Bevin is a prominent sharply pointed mountain at the western side of the head of Murray Glacier. The mountain stands 2 miles (3.2 km) west-northwest of Mount Sabine. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) (2004) after Anthony (Tony) J. Bevin, Surveyor-General of New Zealand, and Chairman of the New Zealand Geographic Board, 1996–2004, with responsibility for New Zealand surveying and place naming in Antarctica.[5]

Mount Black PrinceEdit

Mount Black Prince is composed of dark colored rock, which tends to create an imposing appearance. Located 6 km (3.7 mi) west of Mount Ajax. Named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZ GSAE), 1957–58, for its appearance and also for the New Zealand Cruiser HMNZS Black Prince.[6]

Mount GilruthEdit

Mount Gilruth is a mostly ice-covered mountain (3,160 m) 4.5 nautical miles (8 km) east-northeast of Mount Adam. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Robert R. Gilruth of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, a visitor at McMurdo Station, 1966-67.[7]

Mount MintoEdit

Mount Minto is a lofty, mostly ice-free mountain located 4 km (2.5 mi) E of Mount Adam in the central portion of the range. Discovered in January 1841 by Captain James Ross, who named it for the Earl of Minto, then First Lord of the Admiralty.[8] The first ascent was made in 1988 by the Australian Bicentennial Antarctic Expedition led by Greg Mortimer and included Lincoln Hall.[9]

Mount ParkerEdit

Mount Parker is a bluff-type mountain along the western side of Nash Glacier. The area was mapped by the USGS from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. The name Mount Parker was given to a mountain in this general vicinity by Captain James Ross, in 1840, honoring Vice Admiral Sir William Parker, a senior naval lord of the Admiralty, 1834-41. For the sake of historical continuity US-ACAN has retained the name for this mountain.[10]

Mount PeacockEdit

Mount Peacock is a high peak standing directly at the head of Kelly Glacier, 2.6 km (1.6 mi) southwest of Mount Herschel. It was discovered in January 1841 by Captain Ross who named it for the Very Reverend Dr. George Peacock, Dean of Ely.[11]

Mount RoyalistEdit

Mount Royalist is a prominent mountain standing 3 km (1.9 mi) west of Mount Adam. Named by the New Zealand GSAE, 1957–58, for its impressive appearance and also for the New Zealand cruiser HMNZS Royalist. Several adjacent peaks are named for New Zealand ships including Mount Ajax and Mount Black Prince.[12]

Mount SabineEdit

Mount Sabine is a prominent, relatively snow-free mountain rising between the heads of Murray Glacier and Burnette Glacier. Discovered on January 11, 1841, by Captain James Ross, Royal Navy, who named this feature for Lieutenant Colonel Edward Sabine of the Royal Artillery, Foreign Secretary of the Royal Society, one of the most active supporters of the expedition.[13]

FeaturesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Admiralty Mountains". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2004-10-31.
  2. ^ "Mount Achilles". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2008-03-23.
  3. ^ "Mount Adam". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2004-11-04.
  4. ^ "Mount Ajax". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2004-11-02.
  5. ^ "Mount Bevin". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2007-03-12.
  6. ^ "Mount Black Prince". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2004-11-02.
  7. ^ "Mount Gilruth". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2009-02-19.
  8. ^ "Mount Minto". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2007-01-29.
  9. ^ "Half Sledge - Greg Mortimer, Mt Minto, 1988". Museum Victoria. Archived from the original on 2015-11-28. Retrieved 2010-05-12.
  10. ^ "Mount Parker". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2004-10-31.
  11. ^ "Mount Peacock". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2007-03-12.
  12. ^ "Mount Royalist". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2004-11-02.
  13. ^ "Mount Sabine". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2007-03-12.